Wilderness Mail


1h 5m 1935

Film Details

Also Known As
James Oliver Curwood's Wilderness Mail
Release Date
Mar 13, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Ambassador Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Ambassador Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Big Bear, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Wilderness Mail" by James Oliver Curwood (publication undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Film Length
6 reels

Synopsis

Rance Raine, a trapper in the Yukon, receives word that his twin brother Keith, a newly promoted corporal in the North West Mounted Police, is coming to visit. While Rance is mushing to meet Keith on the trail, Lobo McBain and his henchmen, Jacques and Mora, ambush trapper Baptiste, steal his furs and head for his cabin, which he shares with his partner Pierre. After they have left Baptiste for dead, Keith finds him, and before dying, Baptiste tells Keith that Lobo is responsible and that the gang is heading for his cabin. The gang reaches the cabin and kills Pierre, after which Keith finds and captures them. Because he is wounded in the struggle, Keith makes them march ahead of him across the snow towards the trading post. Keith collapses on the way, and after Jacques insists that it is bad luck to kill a Mountie, Lobo ties Keith to a tree, intending for the wolves to finish him off. Lobo, Jacques and Mora leave, but their plan is foiled when Rance finds Keith. Rance takes Keith to a nearby cabin, where Lila Landau welcomes them and then goes to fetch the doctor. While she is gone, Keith tells Rance that Lobo McBain is responsible, but he dies before he can describe him. Just then, Lobo, who is known locally as Landau, returns to the cabin, which he shares with Lila, his stepdaughter. Lobo realizes that Rance does not know who he is, and he is further relieved when Rance, determined to punish his brother's killer himself, does not reveal Keith's dying words to Inspector Logan. Soon after, another member of Lobo's gang, Jules, gets drunk and brags about knowing Lobo. Rance follows Jules to his cabin, and after a little persuasion, Jules is about to reveal who Lobo is when Lobo shoots him through the window. While Rance is looking for the killer's tracks, he meets Logan, who tells him that Lobo's police records, including photographs, will be arriving via the next "wilderness mail." Rance then meets Lila, whom he takes home. There he tells her that he is going to intercept the mail, so that he can catch Lobo before Logan does. Lobo overhears him, fills in Jacques and Mora and follows Rance. Lila realizes that they are up to no good and also follows. Rance intercepts the mailman, but before he can get the letter, Lobo's gang shoots at them and they are forced to flee. Rance's sled tips over and he is knocked unconscious. Lila finds him, takes him back to the cabin and searches for Logan. Jacques and Mora return to the cabin, where Rance has found the snowshoes he gave to Keith. He forces them to confess that Landau and Lobo McBain are the same man, and he leaves to find Lobo. In town, Lobo has stolen a bag of gold, and Rance helps him escape. Rance then takes Lobo to the tree that Keith was tied to, and despite Lobo's pleas for mercy, Rance ties him up. Just then, Logan and his men arrive and take Lobo away to face justice. Freed from his desire for revenge, Rance takes Lila to meet his parents.

Film Details

Also Known As
James Oliver Curwood's Wilderness Mail
Release Date
Mar 13, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Ambassador Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Ambassador Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Big Bear, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Wilderness Mail" by James Oliver Curwood (publication undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Film Length
6 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

In the opening credits, the film is introduced as "James Oliver Curwood's Wilderness Mail." Hollywood Reporter news items noted that director Forrest Sheldon was working on the script with adaptor Robert Dillon, and that part of the film was shot on location at Big Bear, CA. A 1914 Selig two-reeler produced by Colin Campbell with the same title was also an adaptation of a James Oliver Curwood story. According to modern sources, the cast included Maynard's horse "Rocky."