Twice in a Lifetime


1h 57m 1985
Twice in a Lifetime

Brief Synopsis

A middle-aged man starts an affair with a younger woman and discovers the pain he causes his wife and children.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
Yorkin Company
Location
Snohomish, Washington, USA; Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Synopsis

A middle-aged man starts an affair with a younger woman and discovers the pain he causes his wife and children.

Crew

Josh Abbey

Music

Edward M. Abroms

Editor

Robin Citrin

Location Manager

Royce G Clark

Song

William Cosentino

Assistant Director

Kenneth J Creber

Set Designer

William Creber

Production Designer

Don Digirolamo

Sound

James Everitt

Production Associate

Alan Freed

Song

Harvey Fuqua

Song

Michael Gibbs

Original Music

Robert W Glass

Sound

Don Hall Jr.

Sound Editor

Ellen Heuer

Foley Artist

Frankie Howard

Sound Editor

Joey Ippolito

Sound Editor

Robert C. Jones

Editor

Charles Darin Knight

Sound

Robert Knudson

Sound

Deborah Lucchesi

Casting

Paul Mccartney

Song

Paul Mccartney

Song Performer

John Mccoy

Video Playback

Nick Mclean

Director Of Photography

Pat Metheny

Music

Anthony Mondello

Set Decorator

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Michael O'shea

Camera Operator

Catherine L Peacock

Associate Editor

Erica Edell Phillips

Costumes

Bernie Pollack

Costume Designer

Kathryn Rhodes

Production Associate

David Salven

Executive Producer

David Salven

Unit Production Manager

Michael Salven

Production Associate

Nannette Siegert

Production Coordinator

Hallie Smith Simmons

Makeup

Jeff Sparks

Production Associate

Pam Sprowl

Production Associate

Stephen St John

Steadicam Operator

Daniel C Striepeke

Makeup

Gordon Terry

Song Performer

Gordon Terry

Song

Tommy Thompson

Assistant Director

Don Warner

Sound Editor

Edward A. Warschilka

Associate Editor

Colin Welland

Play As Source Material

Colin Welland

Screenplay

Tom Wild

Song

Bud Yorkin

Producer

David Yorkin

Associate Producer

Mighty Joe Young

Song

Mighty Joe Young

Song Performer

Michael Z

Song Performer

Michael Z

Song

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
Yorkin Company
Location
Snohomish, Washington, USA; Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Award Nominations

Best Supporting Actress

1985
Amy Madigan

Articles

Twice in a Lifetime (1985)


Gene Hackman plays a blue-collar family man and Ann-Margret a widowed bartender who rekindles the dormant passions of the middle-aged husband and father in Twice in a Lifetime (1985), a story of family, divorce, new beginnings, and love the second time around.

The original script by Colin Welland was revised and expanded from a television play he had written for British TV in 1973. Kisses at Fifty was the story of steelworker in Manchester who leaves his wife for a barmaid when he turns fifty. Bud Yorkin, a veteran director best known as Norman Lear's TV producing partner on All in the Family and other iconic seventies sitcoms, loved the story and envisioned a film set in an American milieu. Yorkin had grown up in a Pennsylvania steel town and felt the story could be relocated there. Welland moved to Pittsburg for six months for research while writing his new version and he incorporated the culture he saw around him, which remained even after Yorkin relocated the setting once again, from Pennsylvania to Seattle.

Gene Hackman was Yorkin's first choice to play Harry, the husband and father who leaves his family when he falls for the recently widowed Audrey. He responded immediately to the screenplay. "[T]his story moved me more than a lot of other things I'd done more or less immediately before," Hackman shared with biographer Michael Munn years later. "I'm at an age where I get offered these fatherly parts… but this one interested me because the father changes. He's got a hard edge to him but he's also got a soft side…"

Yorkin had known Ann-Margret for decades and had directed her on a number of TV variety shows. The role of Audrey was a change of pace for the actress but Yorkin thought of her for the role and sent her a script. She had recently announced her retirement from the stage to spend more time with her husband Roger, who was battling a progressive disease known as myasthenia gravis, when she received it. "I have to get a story that excites me, that will make me want to get up at 4 a.m. and get home at 8 p.m.," she explained in a 1985 interview. "This script is very honest – brutally honest – about marriage, divorce and separation."

The rest of the cast was filled with some of the best actors in Hollywood: Oscar-winner Ellen Burstyn as Harry's wife Kate, rising star Amy Madigan as the volatile eldest daughter Sunny, teen-movie star Ally Sheedy (fresh off WarGames, 1983 and The Breakfast Club, 1985) as younger daughter Helen, and Brian Dennehy as Harry's best friend Nick.

Yorkin and Hackman were both going through divorces at the time. Yorkin joked that "I guess the film was something of a therapy for both of us," but Hackman was more circumspect. "It was a little painful for me to play that role, and although I thought I could use some of what I was going through at the time, it didn't really work out that way." Ann-Margret had a different connection. "My godmother has been a waitress for 30 years in Chicago, at the Merchandise Mart. I know from her how hard the job is on your feet."

Yorkin rehearsed with the cast in Los Angeles for a week before heading north to Seattle in the summer of 1984, where he shot on location in and around Seattle and Snohomish, a small mill town northeast of Seattle. The rehearsals served the cast well as Yorkin improvised family scenes between Kate and her daughters, including a scene where Kate has her ears pierced. Burstyn, who did not have pierced ears, had to be talked into getting it done on camera. Her startled response is genuine.

The most difficult scene to shoot, according to Hackman, was when Sunny (Amy Madigan) drags Kate into the neighborhood watering hole to confront Harry in front of his friends and his mistress. Welland based the scene on an event he witnessed firsthand during his Pittsburgh visit. "It was such an uncomfortable scene to do, and being uncomfortable and self-conscious is something we all dread," recalled Hackman. "It makes us vulnerable, so when we came to shoot it, just about all the actors wanted their lines reduced; some just didn't want to do it." Yorkin and Ann-Margret both insist that this scene earned Madigan her Academy Award nomination.

The film opened to mixed reviews but the cast earned overwhelming praise. "You could probably not assemble a finer cast, person for person, pound for pound, than the actors who make up the Twice in a Lifetime blue-collar family," proclaimed Los Angeles Times critic Sheila Benson, who singled out Amy Madigan's performance: "almost incandescent in her fury at her father." Janet Maslin, writing for The New York Times, concurs, noting that Madigan "plays her role with a fierce, riveting conviction bordering on downright belligerence." Madigan earned Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for her performance and Hackman received a Golden Globe nomination.

 
Sources:

Ann-Margret My Story, Ann-Margret with Todd Gold. Putnam, 1994.

"'Lifetime' Cast Needs Life Lines," Sheila Benson. Los Angeles Times, October 30, 1985.

"Film: Tale of a Divorce, 'Twice in a Lifetime'," Janet Maslin. The New York Times, October 23, 1985.

"Ann-Margret Puts Her Marriage First," Bart Mills. South Florida Sun-Sentinel, June 29, 1985.

Gene Hackman, Michael Munn. Robert Hale Limited, 1997.

AFI Catalog of Feature Films

Audio commentary with Bud Yorkin, Ann-Margret, and Amy Madigan, Twice in a Lifetime DVD. Warner Bros. Home Video, 2005.

Twice In A Lifetime (1985)

Twice in a Lifetime (1985)

Gene Hackman plays a blue-collar family man and Ann-Margret a widowed bartender who rekindles the dormant passions of the middle-aged husband and father in Twice in a Lifetime (1985), a story of family, divorce, new beginnings, and love the second time around.The original script by Colin Welland was revised and expanded from a television play he had written for British TV in 1973. Kisses at Fifty was the story of steelworker in Manchester who leaves his wife for a barmaid when he turns fifty. Bud Yorkin, a veteran director best known as Norman Lear's TV producing partner on All in the Family and other iconic seventies sitcoms, loved the story and envisioned a film set in an American milieu. Yorkin had grown up in a Pennsylvania steel town and felt the story could be relocated there. Welland moved to Pittsburg for six months for research while writing his new version and he incorporated the culture he saw around him, which remained even after Yorkin relocated the setting once again, from Pennsylvania to Seattle.Gene Hackman was Yorkin's first choice to play Harry, the husband and father who leaves his family when he falls for the recently widowed Audrey. He responded immediately to the screenplay. "[T]his story moved me more than a lot of other things I'd done more or less immediately before," Hackman shared with biographer Michael Munn years later. "I'm at an age where I get offered these fatherly parts… but this one interested me because the father changes. He's got a hard edge to him but he's also got a soft side…"Yorkin had known Ann-Margret for decades and had directed her on a number of TV variety shows. The role of Audrey was a change of pace for the actress but Yorkin thought of her for the role and sent her a script. She had recently announced her retirement from the stage to spend more time with her husband Roger, who was battling a progressive disease known as myasthenia gravis, when she received it. "I have to get a story that excites me, that will make me want to get up at 4 a.m. and get home at 8 p.m.," she explained in a 1985 interview. "This script is very honest – brutally honest – about marriage, divorce and separation."The rest of the cast was filled with some of the best actors in Hollywood: Oscar-winner Ellen Burstyn as Harry's wife Kate, rising star Amy Madigan as the volatile eldest daughter Sunny, teen-movie star Ally Sheedy (fresh off WarGames, 1983 and The Breakfast Club, 1985) as younger daughter Helen, and Brian Dennehy as Harry's best friend Nick.Yorkin and Hackman were both going through divorces at the time. Yorkin joked that "I guess the film was something of a therapy for both of us," but Hackman was more circumspect. "It was a little painful for me to play that role, and although I thought I could use some of what I was going through at the time, it didn't really work out that way." Ann-Margret had a different connection. "My godmother has been a waitress for 30 years in Chicago, at the Merchandise Mart. I know from her how hard the job is on your feet."Yorkin rehearsed with the cast in Los Angeles for a week before heading north to Seattle in the summer of 1984, where he shot on location in and around Seattle and Snohomish, a small mill town northeast of Seattle. The rehearsals served the cast well as Yorkin improvised family scenes between Kate and her daughters, including a scene where Kate has her ears pierced. Burstyn, who did not have pierced ears, had to be talked into getting it done on camera. Her startled response is genuine.The most difficult scene to shoot, according to Hackman, was when Sunny (Amy Madigan) drags Kate into the neighborhood watering hole to confront Harry in front of his friends and his mistress. Welland based the scene on an event he witnessed firsthand during his Pittsburgh visit. "It was such an uncomfortable scene to do, and being uncomfortable and self-conscious is something we all dread," recalled Hackman. "It makes us vulnerable, so when we came to shoot it, just about all the actors wanted their lines reduced; some just didn't want to do it." Yorkin and Ann-Margret both insist that this scene earned Madigan her Academy Award nomination.The film opened to mixed reviews but the cast earned overwhelming praise. "You could probably not assemble a finer cast, person for person, pound for pound, than the actors who make up the Twice in a Lifetime blue-collar family," proclaimed Los Angeles Times critic Sheila Benson, who singled out Amy Madigan's performance: "almost incandescent in her fury at her father." Janet Maslin, writing for The New York Times, concurs, noting that Madigan "plays her role with a fierce, riveting conviction bordering on downright belligerence." Madigan earned Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for her performance and Hackman received a Golden Globe nomination. Sources:Ann-Margret My Story, Ann-Margret with Todd Gold. Putnam, 1994."'Lifetime' Cast Needs Life Lines," Sheila Benson. Los Angeles Times, October 30, 1985."Film: Tale of a Divorce, 'Twice in a Lifetime'," Janet Maslin. The New York Times, October 23, 1985."Ann-Margret Puts Her Marriage First," Bart Mills. South Florida Sun-Sentinel, June 29, 1985.Gene Hackman, Michael Munn. Robert Hale Limited, 1997.AFI Catalog of Feature FilmsAudio commentary with Bud Yorkin, Ann-Margret, and Amy Madigan, Twice in a Lifetime DVD. Warner Bros. Home Video, 2005.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States September 1985

Released in United States Summer September 1, 1985

Began shooting July 19, 1984.

Released in United States September 1985

Released in United States Summer September 1, 1985