This Woman Is Mine


1h 32m 1941

Film Details

Also Known As
Fury at Sea, I James Lewis
Release Date
Aug 22, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Frank Lloyd Productions, Inc.; Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Lake Tahoe, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel I, James Lewis by Gilbert Wolf Gabriel (New York, 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,241ft

Synopsis

In 1810 in New York, John Jacob Astor plans a two-year fur expedition into the Oregon wilderness. He tells Scottish fur traders Duncan MacDougall and Angus McKay that he is sending with them his top man, Robert Stevens, a seemingly mousy accountant. The crew of the expedition is to be manned by a group of rough-and-tumble French-Canadian voyagers led by Ovide de Montigny. At a local café, Ovide meets naïve singer Julie Morgan, whom he seduces by promising to take her to Paris. When she asks to go with him when he sails the next day, he lies simply tells her that the ship is too small, without revealing its true destination. The ship Tonquin sets sail, under the stern discipline of Captain Jonathan Thorn. Once at sea, Robert discovers that Julie has stowed away on the ship, still thinking it is going to France. Thorn discovers Julie and, refusing to listen to the truth, announces to the crew that she was smuggled aboard by Robert and that she is to be treated like a cabin boy. Ovide fails to admit his involvement in the matter, and bitter rifts develop between Robert and Ovide, and between Robert and Thorn. Later in the voyage, Julie finally confronts Ovide, and he uses his manly charms to convince her to meet him on deck that night. When Thorn sends Robert to summon Julie, she falls overboard, but is saved by Ovide. Thorn soon becomes infatuated with Julie, and changes course to the Falkland Islands to take on water. At first, Thorn refuses to allow Julie ashore, but Robert, MacDougall and McKay convince the captain to let her go with them. Ovide and Julie sneak off together, and she asks him to marry her. When he refuses, she realizes the truth about the French-Canadian's intentions and runs off. Thorn decides to sail without them, and when he refuses to listen to Robert's pleas to wait, the young accountant threatens to kill the captain. After Ovide and Julie are safely aboard the ship, Robert is arrested for mutiny. Ovide then confesses all to Thorn and states that he will finally agree to marry the singer. When Thorn questions his motives, Ovide suggests that the captain may be more interested in her than he wishes to acknowledge. Upon arriving at the mouth of the Columbia River in Oregon, Thorn agrees to release Robert, but warns him not to return to the ship unless he wants to face trial for mutiny. After two months, the fort is almost completed, but the fur trading is going very slowly. Thorn tells Julie that she can live ashore, as Robert, Ovide and McKay are leading an expedition into the interior. Before they leave, however, Robert and Ovide get into a fight over Julie, during which Ovide falls, breaking his leg. After three months without word from Robert's river party, Thorn decides to take command of the expedition and moves the ship two hundred miles north to deal with another tribe of Indians. In the meantime, Robert returns, only to learn that Thorn is heading into a trap devised by the deceitful Indian Lamazie. Realizing that Julie is aboard the ship, Robert and Ovide travel overland to try to warn the ship. Robert is injured trying to traverse a waterfall, but continues with Ovide, despite his impairment. Their canoe arrives just as Lamazie's tribe is about to spring their trap. Robert sneaks Julie off the ship, then warns Thorn just as the Indians attack. In the ensuing mêlée, Ovide and Thorn are mortally wounded. Realizing that defeat and death are imminent, Thorn blows up the ship once Robert and Julie are safely ashore.

Film Details

Also Known As
Fury at Sea, I James Lewis
Release Date
Aug 22, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Frank Lloyd Productions, Inc.; Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Lake Tahoe, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel I, James Lewis by Gilbert Wolf Gabriel (New York, 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,241ft

Award Nominations

Best Score

1941

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of this film were I, James Lewis and This Girl Is Mine. An undated contemporary Hollywood Reporter news item found in AFI Library files indicates that the Gilbert Gabriel novel was purchased in 1936 by Paramount, which planned it as a "vehicle" for actress Claudette Colbert, with Frank Lloyd as director. In November 1940, Lloyd, with his partner, Jack Skirball, purchased the unproduced property from Paramount, planning it as their first production for Universal. Los Angeles Examiner reported that Lloyd borrowed actor John Carroll from M-G-M and unsuccessfully attempted to borrow actress Priscilla Lane from Warner Bros. for the role of "Julie." This was the first film for actress Carol Bruce, who had previously been a musical star on Broadway in such productions as Louisiana Purchase. According to Universal press materials, portions of the film were shot on location in Lake Tahoe, California, and a log fort was constructed, similar in design to the actual fort built by the Astor expedition in 1810. This recreated fort was built by the Washoe Indian tribe of Carson City, Nevada, on land rented from Harry Comstock, heir to the Comstock Lode fortune. In compliance with conservation laws, Universal was required to plant five hundred new trees to replace those used in the construction of the fort. Press materials also state that noted Indian opera singer Chief Yowlachie acted in the film in the role of "Chief 'One-Eye' Comcomly," as well as teaching the Chinook Indian language to the actors in the film. The Motion Picture Herald Prod Digest review mistakenly identifies actor Roger Imhof in the role of "John Jacob Astor." Imhof is listed in the cast in early Hollywood Reporter production charts; thus, it is possible that he was replaced by Sig Ruman during production. This film is a highly fictionalized account of the 1810-1811 expedition, financed by John Jacob Astor, which established the Pacific Fur Company fur-trading post at Ft. Astoria on the bank of the Columbia River. Richard Hageman received an Academy Award nomination in the Music (Music Score of a Dramatic Picture) category. The film was re-released in 1949 by Realart under the title Fury at Sea.