That's Life!


1h 42m 1986
That's Life!

Brief Synopsis

A wealthy architect struggles with a severe case of male menopause at the approach of his 60th birthday.

Film Details

Also Known As
Blake Edwards' That's Life!, That's Life
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Malibu, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

A wealthy architect struggles with a severe case of male menopause at the approach of his 60th birthday.

Crew

Richard W Adams

Video

Tony Adams

Producer

August Bach

Other

Charles Bartlett

Other

Ben Batzdorff

Best Boy

Tony Bennett

Song Performer

Tom Bocci

Music Supervisor

Leslie Bricusse

Theme Lyrics

Al Bunetta

Music Supervisor

Peter Bunetta

Song

Julie Byers

Production Assistant

Trish Caroselli

Associate Producer

Mitch Carter

Other

Kenny S Christiansen

Electrician

Rick Chudacoff

Song

K.c. Colwell

Assistant Director

Sam Cooke

Song

Sam Cooke

Song Performer

Gary L Dagg

Dolly Grip

Gary L Dagg

Best Boy

Michelle Davison

Other

Carrie Dieterich

Production Coordinator

Judi Durand

Other

Jim Early

Grip

Blake Edwards

Screenplay

George Escalera

Craft Service

Deborah Fallender

Other

Deborah Figuly

Makeup

Judy French

Assistant

Tim Fry

Transportation Captain

Jane Galli

Makeup Assistant

Candy Gonzalez

Assistant Camera Operator

Barbara Harris

Other

Julian Heap

Hair

Rick Herrington

Electrician

Rowdy Herrington

Gaffer

Doris Hess

Other

Dennis Hoffman

Location Assistant

David J Hudson

Sound

Kevin Hughes

Property Master

Lori Jedeikin

Props

Saint John

Key Grip

Kent Jorgensen

Grip

Daamen Krall

Other

Jonathan D Krane

Executive Producer

Steve Lalande

Production Assistant

Alan Levine

Production Manager

Alan Levine

Assistant Director

Michael Linn

Music Editor

Joe Lopes

Music Coordinator

Bruce Macpherson

Song

Elton Macpherson

Production Associate

Tommy Magglos

Camera Operator

Henry Mancini

Song

Henry Mancini

Music

Tony Marando

Set Decorator

Jocko Marcellino

Song

Connie Mccauley

Associate Producer

David Mccharen

Other

Mel Metcalfe

Sound

Richard C Miller

Assistant Camera Operator

Katie Morgan

Location Assistant

Larry Moss

Other

Kathleen Mascia O'brien

Production Assistant

Nina Padovano

Costumes

Daniel Pershing

Grip

Terry Porter

Sound

Mary Ann Puetz

Hair

Jaimie Raskin

Production Accountant

Sharron Reynolds

Script Supervisor

Lee Rhoads

Editor

Tony Richmond

Director Of Photography

Laura Rindner

Assistant Editor

Marilyn Schreffler

Other

Bryan Scott

Other

Steve Sollars

Boom Operator

John St John

Grip

Bruce Stubblefield

Sound Editor

Don Summer

Sound Mixer

Jim Thorpe

Grip

Tracy Tynan

Costume Designer

Ernie Watts

Song Performer

Milton Wexler

Screenplay

Sachi Worrall

Hair

Lynnanne Zager

Other

Rozanne Zingale

Assistant Editor

Videos

Movie Clip

That's Life! (1986) -- (Movie Clip) They Be Dumb Dropped off after hitching a ride due to car trouble at his Malibu mansion (the real home of writer-director-producer Blake Edwards, in his independently-financed feature), architect Harvey (Jack Lemmon) doesn't ask how his actress wife Gillian (Julie Andrews, also Mrs. Edwards) is doing, though we know she’s waiting on a cancer test, early in That’s Life, 1986.
That's Life! (1986) -- (Movie Clip) I'll Be So Delicious In a shot writer-producer-director Blake Edwards needed several days to get, due to fog on the beach at his own Malibu home, actress Gillian (Julia Andrews, Mrs. Edwards), secretly awaiting results of a cancer test, meets friend and realtor Molly (Sally Kellerman) exercising, in That’s Life, 1986.
That's Life! (1986) -- (Movie Clip) Open, The First One's Painless Opening with sounds of surgery under the credits, from writer-director Blake Edwards, his leading lady (Julie Andrews, Edwards’ wife) gets a cancer test, attended by a real Beverly Hills clinician (Charles Schneider) and reassured by friend Keith (Jordan Christopher), in That’s Life, 1986, also starring Jack Lemmon.
That's Life! (1986) -- (Movie Clip) Success Breeds Failure At a posh Malibu restaurant, architect Harvey (Jack Lemmon), going bonkers as his 60th birthday looms, ruminates about a demanding client and his own angst, his actress wife Gillian (Julie Andrews, spouse of writer-director Blake Edwards) riding it out, in That’s Life, 1986.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Blake Edwards' That's Life!, That's Life
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Malibu, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Award Nominations

Best Song

1986

Articles

That's Life!


Writer and director Blake Edwards is best known today for his outrageous slapstick, farcical and romantic comedies, including Operation Petticoat (1959); the original Pink Panther series starring Peter Sellers (beginning with The Pink Panther in 1963); Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) starring Audrey Hepburn; The Great Race (1965) starring Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood; and Victor/Victoria (1982) starring Julie Andrews (who was married to Edwards from 1969 until his death in 2010) and James Garner. Despite his impressive comedic chops as both a writer and director, Edwards also crossed over into melodrama on occasion, most notably with Days of Wine and Roses (1962), starring Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick, and with one of his last theatrically-released films, the comedy-drama That’s Life! (1986), also starring Jack Lemmon along with Julie Andrews.

Jack Lemmon is Harvey Fairchild, a successful architect whose depression and anxiety are heightened by his upcoming 60th birthday party, adding to an impending nervous breakdown. His wife Gillian, played by Julie Andrews, is supportive of him, but she is quietly suffering with a potential health crisis that she keeps secret from her family. Unfortunately, Harvey is selfishly unable to see past his own issues acting out toward his family, while also engaging in meaningless affairs with other women. His behavior threatens to not only destroy himself but the lives of his wife Gillian and their children.

Lemmon and Edwards had a long working relationship that began when both were at the start of their careers. Their first collaboration was on the 1955 musical comedy My Sister Eileen, which was written by Edwards and directed by Richard Quine. Edwards and Lemmon worked together under the direction of Richard Quine on two more productions: Operation Mad Ball (1957) also starring Ernie Kovacs and Mickey Rooney; and The Notorious Landlady (1962) with Kim Novak and Fred Astaire. After the commercial success of his first major theatrical directorial effort with Operation Petticoat (1959), starring Cary Grant and Tony Curtis, Blake Edwards had finally established himself as a respected director and was behind some of the most popular films of the 1960s. Following the success of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Edwards cast Lemmon in Days of Wine and Roses in 1962, which was a serious departure from his usual comedic fare. While Lemmon had shown his dramatic side, especially in films such as The Apartment (1960), this role really demonstrated his skill in playing damaged characters on the verge of losing it all – a type of character that Lemmon occasionally revisited for the remainder of his long career. Lemmon and Edwards reteamed twice more: on 1965’s The Great Race, a huge departure from the bleak melodrama of Days of Wine and Roses, and again 21 years later on That’s Life!.

Julie Andrews and Blake Edwards not only had a marriage that spanned over 40 years until Edwards death in 2010, but also a close working relationship. Andrews starred in eight films directed by her husband, including Darling Lili (1970), starring Rock Hudson; 10 (1979), with Dudley Moore and Bo Derek; S.O.B. (1981) with William Holden; Victor/Victoria, starring James Garner; and The Man Who Loved Women (1983), with Burt Reynolds.

Edwards struggled to secure funding for That’s Life!, ultimately opting to go independent and largely self-finance, striking a distribution deal with Columbia Pictures. To cut production costs, Edwards shot much of the film in his and Andrews’s Malibu home and cast their own children in supporting roles. Jack Lemmon’s own family also lent a hand, with son Chris Lemmon playing the son of his character Harvey, as well as wife Felicia Farr as Madame Carrie. Unfortunately, the production violated union standards due to low pay, setting off protests from the American Society of Cinematographers and prompting the departure of cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr., whom Edwards had previously worked with on S.O.B., Micki + Maude (1984) and A Fine Mess (1986). Anthony B. Richmond, then known for his work on The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976) and the rock documentary The Kids Are Alright (1979), stepped in as director of photography. Edwards and Stradling Jr. worked together once more, on Blind Date in 1987.

Director: Blake Edwards
Producer: Tony Adams, Johnathan D. Krane and Trish Caroselli
Screenplay: Blake Edwards and Milton Wexler
Cinematography: Anthony B. Richmond
Editing: Lee Rhoads
Music: Henry Mancini
Cast: Jack Lemmon (Harvey Fairchild), Julie Andrews (Gillian Fairchild), Sally Kellerman (Holly Parrish), Robert Loggia (Father Baragone), Jennifer Edwards (Megan Fairchild Bartlet), Robert Knepper (Steve Larwin), Matt Lattanzi (Larry Bartlet), Chris Lemmon (Josh Fairchild), Felicia Farr (Madame Carrie) and Teddy Wilson (Corey).
C-102m

References
https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/thats-life-1986
https://www.nytimes.com/1986/09/21/movies/real-life-buoys-that-s-life.html

By Jill Blake
That's Life!

That's Life!

Writer and director Blake Edwards is best known today for his outrageous slapstick, farcical and romantic comedies, including Operation Petticoat (1959); the original Pink Panther series starring Peter Sellers (beginning with The Pink Panther in 1963); Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) starring Audrey Hepburn; The Great Race (1965) starring Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood; and Victor/Victoria (1982) starring Julie Andrews (who was married to Edwards from 1969 until his death in 2010) and James Garner. Despite his impressive comedic chops as both a writer and director, Edwards also crossed over into melodrama on occasion, most notably with Days of Wine and Roses (1962), starring Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick, and with one of his last theatrically-released films, the comedy-drama That’s Life! (1986), also starring Jack Lemmon along with Julie Andrews. Jack Lemmon is Harvey Fairchild, a successful architect whose depression and anxiety are heightened by his upcoming 60th birthday party, adding to an impending nervous breakdown. His wife Gillian, played by Julie Andrews, is supportive of him, but she is quietly suffering with a potential health crisis that she keeps secret from her family. Unfortunately, Harvey is selfishly unable to see past his own issues acting out toward his family, while also engaging in meaningless affairs with other women. His behavior threatens to not only destroy himself but the lives of his wife Gillian and their children. Lemmon and Edwards had a long working relationship that began when both were at the start of their careers. Their first collaboration was on the 1955 musical comedy My Sister Eileen, which was written by Edwards and directed by Richard Quine. Edwards and Lemmon worked together under the direction of Richard Quine on two more productions: Operation Mad Ball (1957) also starring Ernie Kovacs and Mickey Rooney; and The Notorious Landlady (1962) with Kim Novak and Fred Astaire. After the commercial success of his first major theatrical directorial effort with Operation Petticoat (1959), starring Cary Grant and Tony Curtis, Blake Edwards had finally established himself as a respected director and was behind some of the most popular films of the 1960s. Following the success of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Edwards cast Lemmon in Days of Wine and Roses in 1962, which was a serious departure from his usual comedic fare. While Lemmon had shown his dramatic side, especially in films such as The Apartment (1960), this role really demonstrated his skill in playing damaged characters on the verge of losing it all – a type of character that Lemmon occasionally revisited for the remainder of his long career. Lemmon and Edwards reteamed twice more: on 1965’s The Great Race, a huge departure from the bleak melodrama of Days of Wine and Roses, and again 21 years later on That’s Life!. Julie Andrews and Blake Edwards not only had a marriage that spanned over 40 years until Edwards death in 2010, but also a close working relationship. Andrews starred in eight films directed by her husband, including Darling Lili (1970), starring Rock Hudson; 10 (1979), with Dudley Moore and Bo Derek; S.O.B. (1981) with William Holden; Victor/Victoria, starring James Garner; and The Man Who Loved Women (1983), with Burt Reynolds. Edwards struggled to secure funding for That’s Life!, ultimately opting to go independent and largely self-finance, striking a distribution deal with Columbia Pictures. To cut production costs, Edwards shot much of the film in his and Andrews’s Malibu home and cast their own children in supporting roles. Jack Lemmon’s own family also lent a hand, with son Chris Lemmon playing the son of his character Harvey, as well as wife Felicia Farr as Madame Carrie. Unfortunately, the production violated union standards due to low pay, setting off protests from the American Society of Cinematographers and prompting the departure of cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr., whom Edwards had previously worked with on S.O.B., Micki + Maude (1984) and A Fine Mess (1986). Anthony B. Richmond, then known for his work on The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976) and the rock documentary The Kids Are Alright (1979), stepped in as director of photography. Edwards and Stradling Jr. worked together once more, on Blind Date in 1987. Director: Blake Edwards Producer: Tony Adams, Johnathan D. Krane and Trish Caroselli Screenplay: Blake Edwards and Milton Wexler Cinematography: Anthony B. Richmond Editing: Lee Rhoads Music: Henry Mancini Cast: Jack Lemmon (Harvey Fairchild), Julie Andrews (Gillian Fairchild), Sally Kellerman (Holly Parrish), Robert Loggia (Father Baragone), Jennifer Edwards (Megan Fairchild Bartlet), Robert Knepper (Steve Larwin), Matt Lattanzi (Larry Bartlet), Chris Lemmon (Josh Fairchild), Felicia Farr (Madame Carrie) and Teddy Wilson (Corey). C-102m References https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/thats-life-1986 https://www.nytimes.com/1986/09/21/movies/real-life-buoys-that-s-life.html By Jill Blake

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 26, 1986

Released in United States September 1986

Began shooting September 30, 1985.

Released in United States September 1986 (Premiered at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 1986.)

Released in United States Fall September 26, 1986