Stand and Deliver


1h 42m 1988
Stand and Deliver

Brief Synopsis

A hopeful teacher uses math to give his gang-member students self esteem.

Film Details

Also Known As
Con ganas de triunfar
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Drama
Biography
Release Date
1988
Production Company
American Playhouse; Arco; Corporation For Public Broadcasting; National Endowment For The Arts; Technicolor; Warner Bros. Pictures
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD); Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group; Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

Based on the true story of Jaime Escalante, a math teacher at East Los Angeles' Garfield High, who refused to write off his inner-city students as losers. Escalante cajoled, pushed, threatened and inspired 18 kids who struggled with fractions to become math wizards.

Crew

Humberto Almeida

Casting Assistant (Extras)

Julian Arellano

Construction Crew Member

Joseph Barbosa

Construction Crew Member

Alex Bodnarczuk

Property Master Assistant

Michael Bodnarczuk

2nd Assistant Director

Barry Bookin

Boom Operator

Jaki Brown-karman

Casting

Duncan Burns

Sound Effects Editor

Mariachi Califas

Song Performer ("Cada Quien Port Su Camino")

Sean Carrillo

Set Dresser

Yvonne M Cervantes

Costumer

Keith Clark

Song Performer ("I Want You")

Keith Clark

Song

Stuart Copley

Dialogue Editor

Julie Cypher

2nd Assistant Director

Lisa Dealva

Property Master

Michael Dressel

Sound Editor Assistant

Steven Fertig

Casting Associate

Jonathan Flores

Set Dresser

Peter Foster

Adr Editor

John Galvan

Construction Crew Member

Phylis Geller

Executive In Charge Of Production

Steve George

Song ("Stand And Deliver")

Sydney Gilner

Script Supervisor

Jacinto Guevara

Song Performer ("Contrabando Del Paso" "Vamonos Pal Norte")

Enrique Guillen

Construction Crew Member

Fred Haft

Set Dresser Supervisor

Stephen Halbert

Sound Recording Mixer

Amy Halpern

Electrician

Wayne Heitman

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Willie Herron

Songs ("El Lay" "Secret Society" "Wake Up John" "Psycho Cha-Cha")

Vered Hochman

Makeup

Vered Hochman

Hairstyles

Robert V. Hoffman

Publicist

Perry Husman

Stunt Coordinator

Matthew Iadarola

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Ken S Johnson

Music Editor

Gregg Karukas

Music Engineer

Iya Labunka

Unit Production Manager

Iya Labunka

Associate Producer

Jane Lane

Foley Editor

John Lang

Song ("Stand And Deliver")

Lindsay Law

Executive Producer

Larry Litton

Location Manager

Steve Livingston

Music Editor

Toni Livingston

Casting

Cris Lombardi

1st Assistant Camera

Kate Long

Project Consultant

Marcos Loya

Song Performer ("Pocho Jarocho" "Contrabando Del Paso" "Vamonos Pal Norte")

Marcos Loya

Song ("Pocho Jarocho" "Vamonos Pal Norte")

Shaun Madigan

Gaffer

Dee Mansano

Hairstyles Supervisor

Dee Mansano

Makeup Supervisor

Ramon Menendez

Screenwriter

Christi Moore

Assistant Editor

Kathryn Morrison

Costume Designer

Tom Musca

Producer

Tom Musca

Screenwriter

Tamra Naggar

Casting Associate

Margi Newquist

Production Coordinator Assistant

Richard Page

Song ("Stand And Deliver")

Patti Peck

Set Dresser

Raquel Perez

Song Performer ("Cada Quien Port Su Camino" "Vamonos Pal Norte")

Raquel Perez

Song ("Cada Quien Port Su Camino")

Ramon Ponce

Location Manager

Cesar Ramirez

Bestboy Electrician

Jose Ramirez

Construction Crew Member

James Reeves

Transportation Coordinator

Marc Reshovsky

Additional Camera Operator

Nancy Richardson

Editor

Nancy Richardson

Post-Production Supervisor

Tom Richmond

Director Of Photography

Barbara Riley

Negative Cutter

Vicki Rocco

Production Accountant

Vicki Rocco

Production Coordinator

Richard Rodriguez

Construction Crew Member

Elliot Lewis Rosenblatt

1st Assistant Director

Craig Safan

Music

John Scherer

2nd Assistant Director

Zander Schloss

Song Performer ("I Want You")

Zeca Seabra

Costumer

Frank Smathers

Dialogue Editor

John St John

Bestboy Grip

Russ St John

Key Grip

Hamilton Sterling

Sound Editor Supervisor

Rob Sweeney

2nd Assistant Camera

Michael Thorpe

Electrician

Jeff Tinnell

Grip

M Valdez

Song ("Secret Society")

Jay Vetter

Assistant Art Director

Paul Wagner

Assistant Editor

Ima Aparicio Watkins

Casting (Extras)

Film Details

Also Known As
Con ganas de triunfar
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Drama
Biography
Release Date
1988
Production Company
American Playhouse; Arco; Corporation For Public Broadcasting; National Endowment For The Arts; Technicolor; Warner Bros. Pictures
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD); Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group; Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1988
Edward James Olmos

Articles

Stand and Deliver


The "heroic teacher" movie genre tends to lie dormant for years at a time, then a picture will pop up to remind everyone just how richly rewarding this type of story can be, provided it's done properly. Ramon Menendez's Stand and Deliver (1988) didn't exactly fall hot on the heels of To Sir with Love (1967) but it is a worthy predecessor to that popular drama, and it packs a little extra punch because it's based on a true, genuinely inspiring story. It also takes place in a considerably rougher neighborhood than the one where Sidney Poitier taught school in the former film.

Edward James Olmos plays James Escalante, a real-life Los Angeles businessman who quits a high-paying job to teach high school in East Los Angeles. Escalante's students, unfortunately, are loud, unruly, and uninterested in his calculus lessons. Still, they grow fond of their intense, off-the-wall instructor, and many are willing to focus and try to excel in math class for him. In the process, they become better people who are able to comprehend that they have something to offer the world.

Stand and Deliver took quite a roundabout route to the big screen. In fact, it wasn't supposed to be a theatrical film at all.

In 1984, director Ramon Menendez, who had recently graduated from UCLA film school, saw an article in the newspaper concerning Escalante and his remarkable students. Menendez enlisted one of his film school buddies, Thomas Musca, as producer and co-writer, and the two committed themselves to getting a film made. It took them six months to convince Escalante to sell the rights to his story. Then Menendez and Musca were turned down by a slew of production companies that didn't see the commercial possibilities of a story about a bunch of minority kids achieving high scores in a difficult and competitive national exam.

Eventually, Menendez and Musca received a $12,000 grant from PBS-TV's American Playhouse and were able to write a complete script. They then secured the services of some better-known Latino actors, the most important of which was Olmos, who at that time had a recurring role on NBC's hit cop show, Miami Vice. Lou Diamond Phillips and Andy Garcia, on the other hand, were still on the cusp of their own legitimate movie careers, so their names weren't as much of a draw. Olmos saw Stand and Deliver - which at this point was called Walking on Water - as both a chance to play a great character and an opportunity to make a positive social statement.

With the actors on board, a small shooting budget was raised from a variety of sources, including The National Science Foundation and the Atlantic-Richfield Corporation. It was apparent that Stand and Deliver was designed solely as a public TV project, but fate would intervene. After the picture was shown at the 1987 Mill Valley Film Festival, Paramount Pictures picked it up and put it into theaters.

Olmos committed so fully to playing Escalante, he gained 40 pounds and had his hair thinned out so he would more closely resemble him. The actor's commitment was rewarded with an Oscar® nomination for Best Actor, yet another example of the film itself experiencing a Cinderella story akin to the one experienced by Escalante's students.

Producer: Tom Musca
Director: Ramon Menendez
Screenplay: Ramon Menendez, Tom Musca
Cinematography: Tom Richmond
Art Direction: Milo
Music: Craig Safan
Film Editing: Nancy Richardson
Cast: Mark Eliot (Tito), Edward James Olmos (Jaime A. Escalante), Estelle Harris (Estelle, Principal Molina's secretary), Mark Phelan (Cop), Virginia Paris (Raquel Ortega), Adelaida Alvarez (sexy girl), Will Gotay (Pancho), Patrick Baca (Javier Perales), Ingrid Oliu (Guadalupe 'Lupe' Escobar), Carmen Argenziano (Mr. Molina, Garfield High Principal), Richard Martinez (heavy metal boy), Mark Everett (heavy metal boy), Tyde Kierney (Joe Goodell), Rosana De Soto (Fabiola Escalante), Bodie Olmos (Fernando Escalante), Karla Montana (Claudia Camejo), Vanessa Marquez (Ana Delgado).
C-104m. Letterboxed.

by Paul Tatara
Stand And Deliver

Stand and Deliver

The "heroic teacher" movie genre tends to lie dormant for years at a time, then a picture will pop up to remind everyone just how richly rewarding this type of story can be, provided it's done properly. Ramon Menendez's Stand and Deliver (1988) didn't exactly fall hot on the heels of To Sir with Love (1967) but it is a worthy predecessor to that popular drama, and it packs a little extra punch because it's based on a true, genuinely inspiring story. It also takes place in a considerably rougher neighborhood than the one where Sidney Poitier taught school in the former film. Edward James Olmos plays James Escalante, a real-life Los Angeles businessman who quits a high-paying job to teach high school in East Los Angeles. Escalante's students, unfortunately, are loud, unruly, and uninterested in his calculus lessons. Still, they grow fond of their intense, off-the-wall instructor, and many are willing to focus and try to excel in math class for him. In the process, they become better people who are able to comprehend that they have something to offer the world. Stand and Deliver took quite a roundabout route to the big screen. In fact, it wasn't supposed to be a theatrical film at all. In 1984, director Ramon Menendez, who had recently graduated from UCLA film school, saw an article in the newspaper concerning Escalante and his remarkable students. Menendez enlisted one of his film school buddies, Thomas Musca, as producer and co-writer, and the two committed themselves to getting a film made. It took them six months to convince Escalante to sell the rights to his story. Then Menendez and Musca were turned down by a slew of production companies that didn't see the commercial possibilities of a story about a bunch of minority kids achieving high scores in a difficult and competitive national exam. Eventually, Menendez and Musca received a $12,000 grant from PBS-TV's American Playhouse and were able to write a complete script. They then secured the services of some better-known Latino actors, the most important of which was Olmos, who at that time had a recurring role on NBC's hit cop show, Miami Vice. Lou Diamond Phillips and Andy Garcia, on the other hand, were still on the cusp of their own legitimate movie careers, so their names weren't as much of a draw. Olmos saw Stand and Deliver - which at this point was called Walking on Water - as both a chance to play a great character and an opportunity to make a positive social statement. With the actors on board, a small shooting budget was raised from a variety of sources, including The National Science Foundation and the Atlantic-Richfield Corporation. It was apparent that Stand and Deliver was designed solely as a public TV project, but fate would intervene. After the picture was shown at the 1987 Mill Valley Film Festival, Paramount Pictures picked it up and put it into theaters. Olmos committed so fully to playing Escalante, he gained 40 pounds and had his hair thinned out so he would more closely resemble him. The actor's commitment was rewarded with an Oscar® nomination for Best Actor, yet another example of the film itself experiencing a Cinderella story akin to the one experienced by Escalante's students. Producer: Tom Musca Director: Ramon Menendez Screenplay: Ramon Menendez, Tom Musca Cinematography: Tom Richmond Art Direction: Milo Music: Craig Safan Film Editing: Nancy Richardson Cast: Mark Eliot (Tito), Edward James Olmos (Jaime A. Escalante), Estelle Harris (Estelle, Principal Molina's secretary), Mark Phelan (Cop), Virginia Paris (Raquel Ortega), Adelaida Alvarez (sexy girl), Will Gotay (Pancho), Patrick Baca (Javier Perales), Ingrid Oliu (Guadalupe 'Lupe' Escobar), Carmen Argenziano (Mr. Molina, Garfield High Principal), Richard Martinez (heavy metal boy), Mark Everett (heavy metal boy), Tyde Kierney (Joe Goodell), Rosana De Soto (Fabiola Escalante), Bodie Olmos (Fernando Escalante), Karla Montana (Claudia Camejo), Vanessa Marquez (Ana Delgado). C-104m. Letterboxed. by Paul Tatara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1988

Released in United States March 18, 1988

Released in United States November 12, 1988

Released in United States on Video November 16, 1988

Released in United States September 1990

Released in United States Winter February 1, 1988

Shown at London Film Festival November 12, 1988.

Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.

Shown at Museum of Modern Art, New York City in the series "American Playhouse Ten Years of Independent Filmmaking" September 16 & 17, 1990.

Broadcast over PBS on "American Playhouse" March 15, 1989.

Began shooting April 1, 1987.

Spanish language version available.

Released in United States 1988 (Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.)

Released in United States Winter February 1, 1988 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States March 18, 1988 (New York City)

Released in United States September 1990 (Shown at Museum of Modern Art, New York City in the series "American Playhouse Ten Years of Independent Filmmaking" September 16 & 17, 1990.)

Released in United States November 12, 1988 (Shown at London Film Festival November 12, 1988.)

Released in United States on Video November 16, 1988