Sense and Sensibility


2h 15m 1995
Sense and Sensibility

Brief Synopsis

Jane Austen's classic tale of two sisters with different romantic notions.

Film Details

Also Known As
Förnuft och känsla, Raison et sentiments, Sense & Sensibility, Sentido y Sensibilidad
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Romance
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Period
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
SONY PICTURES RELEASING/SONY PICTURES RELEASING INTERNATIONAL
Location
Yeovil, Somerset, England, United Kingdom; Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom; Devon, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Synopsis

When Henry Dashwood dies unexpectedly, his estate must pass on by law to his son from his first marriage, John and wife Fanny. But these circumstances leave Mr. Dashwood's current wife, and daughters Elinor, Marianne and Margaret, without a home and with barely enough money to live on. Though John and Fanny inherit the family's vast estate, it is Fanny's shy, charming brother Edward who captures Elinor's heart. But before Elinor and Edward have a chance to express their tentative feelings for each other, Fanny contrives an excuse to send Edward off to London. Marianne, meanwhile, becomes swept up in a passionate affair with the dashing Willoughby, a very public romance conducted with so little prudence by Marianne that it earns her sister's disapproval. As Elinor and Marianne struggle to find romantic fulfillment in a society obsessed with financial and social status, they must learn to mix sense with sensibility in their dealings with both money and men.

Crew

Colin Anderson

Caterer

Seth Anderson

Apprentice

Jan Archibald

Hairdresser

Luciana Arrighi

Production Designer

Lawrence Ashmore

Music

Jane Austen

Source Material (From Novel)

Chris Bain

Camera Trainee

Randall Balsmeyer

Visual Effects Supervisor

Humphrey Barclay

Special Thanks To

Libbie Barr

Script Supervisor

Brian Bassnett

Camera

Keith Batterbee

Other

Jenny Beavan

Costume Designer

John Behan

Carpenter

Bernard Bellew

Assistant Director

Miri Ben-shlomo

Makeup Artist

Mona Benjamin

Assistant

Edward Berger

Production Assistant

Roy Biggs

Production

Jaya Bishop

Sound

Roy Bond

Driver

Laurie Borg

Coproducer

Jed Bray

Driver

Anthony Bregman

Post-Production Supervisor

John Bright

Costume Designer

Debbie Brodie

Other

Richard Broome

Grip

Peter Broook

Driver

Harold Brust

Other

Gerard Bryson

Driver

Cecile Cabal

Other

Paul Caldicott

Caterer

Paul Carr

Adr

Darryl Carter

Carpenter

Jack Carter

Construction Manager

Jean-christophe Castelli

Assistant

Suzy Catliff

Casting Associate

Pietro Cecchini

Assistant Sound Editor

Joe Cimino

Assistant Sound Editor

Tony Clarkson

Location Manager

Jeff Clifford

Special Effects

Hartley Coleridge

Other

Stanley Cook

Propman

Clive Coote

Photography

Mick Coulter

Director Of Photography

Mick Coulter

Dp/Cinematographer

William Cowper

Other

Kay Cutts

Animal Trainer

Tonia Davall

Music Conductor

Tony Dawe

Sound

Margaret Devitt

Special Thanks To

Uinkar Dhillon

Other

Sonny Donato

Grip

D A Doran

Special Thanks To

Lindsay Doran

Producer

Patrick Doyle

Music

Gill Ducker

Production

Sarah Eastel

Special Thanks To

Terry Edland

Gaffer

Philip Elton

Art Director

Ricky Farns

Special Effects Supervisor

Robert Farr

Adr

Gary Fox

Propman

Mark Fruin

Propman

Stephen Fry

Special Thanks To

Darren Gattrell

Electrician

Joy Geoghegan

Other

Jane Gibson

Consultant

Mark Ginsberg

Color Timer

Gerry Gore

Other

Pippa Grant

Stand-In

Chris Gurney

Boom Operator

Andrew Hafitz

Assistant

Les Hall

Carpenter

Steve Hamilton

Sound Editor

Bob Harper

Other

Mick Hart

Consultant

Philippa Hart

Art Assistant

Tony Hayes

Best Boy

John Hedges

Other

Cynthia Leigh Heim

Foley

Andrew Hill

Assistant Location Manager

Sid Hinson

Other

Joe Hobbs

Wardrobe

Yvonne Hobbs

Wardrobe

Sue Honeyborne

Wardrobe Assistant

Stuart Hopps

Choreographer

William Horberg

Special Thanks To

Ben Howarth

Assistant Director

Joyce Hsieh

Post-Production Accountant

Paul Hulme

Music

Sallie Jaye

Makeup Artist

Bobbie Johnson

Production Accountant

John Jordan

Other

Ross Katz

Assistant

Debbie Kaye

Other

Eddit Kaye

Driver

Lesley Keane

Assistant Production Coordinator

Kathy Kelehan

Visual Effects

Paul Kemp

Electrician

Jeanette King

Production Assistant

Anna Kot

Wardrobe Assistant

John A Kouwenhoven

Special Thanks To

Andy Kris

Assistant Sound Editor

Kenneth Langridge

Production

David Lee

Assistant

Susan Littenberg

Assistant Editor

Annie Livings

Stand-In

Lee Lighting Ltd

Lighting

Pippa Marks

Assistant Art Director

Juan Carlos Martinez

Dialogue Editor

Mark Mcneil

Propman

Ken Monger

Electrician

Rob Monger

Electrician

Christina Moore

Storyboard Artist

Tamara Morris

Caterer

Sophia Mueller

Assistant Art Director

Chris Newman

Assistant Director

Paul Newton

Medic

Norman North

Other

Donna Ostroff

Assistant

Chris Plevin

Photography

George Albert Pointer

Production Assistant

Sydney Pollack

Executive Producer

Mary Ellen Porto

Dialogue Editor

Roy Prendergast

Music Editor

Jennifer Ralston

Foley Editor

Ronnie Rampton

Electrician

Carol Regan

Production Coordinator

Darren Reynolds

Propman

Anthony Rhone

Other

Larry Richardson

Assistant Editor

Steve Rickard

Stand-In

Terry Robertson

Advisor

Maggie Rodford

Music Supervisor

Morag Ross

Makeup Artist

Linda Russon

Foley

Andrew Sanders

Art Director

Mel Sansom

Other

James Schamus

Coproducer

Astrid Schikorra

Hairdresser

William Shakespeare

Other

Thomas E. Shea

Editor

Lee Shelley

Other

Steve Silkensen

Adr Editor

Philip Sindall

Camera Operator

Edmund Spenser

Other

Tim Squyres

Editor

Tony Stanton

Music

Reilly Steele

Rerecording

Graham Stickley

Wardrobe

Geoff Stier

Associate Producer

Phil Stoole

Office Runner

Patricia Sztaba

Negative Cutting

Stan Sztaba

Negative Cutting

Barbara Taylor

Hairdresser

Janet Tebrooke

Wardrobe Supervisor

Emma Thompson

Screenplay

Eric Thompson

Special Thanks To

Alan Titmuss

Production

Rebecca Tucker

Production Assistant

Jan Unger

Assistant

Nick Waldron

Production Assistant

Brenda Walton

Special Thanks To

Al Watson

Electrician

Andrew Watson

Electrician

Chris Webb

Assistant Location Manager

Josephine Webb

Special Thanks To

Kenneth Welland

Other

Ian Whittaker

Set Decorator

Arthur Wicks

Property Master

Nick Wilkinson

Stunt Coordinator

Nick Wilkinson

Other

Betty Williams

Accounting Assistant

Roger Willis

Carpenter

Danny Young

Electrician

Keith Young

Assistant Director

Robert Ziegler

Music Conductor

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Förnuft och känsla, Raison et sentiments, Sense & Sensibility, Sentido y Sensibilidad
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Romance
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Period
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
SONY PICTURES RELEASING/SONY PICTURES RELEASING INTERNATIONAL
Location
Yeovil, Somerset, England, United Kingdom; Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom; Devon, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Award Wins

Best Adapted Screenplay

1995

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1995
Emma Thompson

Best Cinematography

1995

Best Costume Design

1995
Jenny Beavan

Best Dramatic Score

1995

Best Picture

1995

Best Supporting Actress

1995
Kate Winslet

Articles

Sense and Sensibility


Lose your heart and come to your senses.
Tagline for Sense and Sensibility

Romantic comedy made a comeback in the mid-'90s, thanks largely to the re-discovery of Jane Austen, the British novelist famous for her stories of romance and manners. A film adaptation of Persuasion won critical claim earlier in 1995, while Clueless, a modernized version of Emma, made Alicia Silverstone a star the same year. Also that year, a television miniseries based on Pride and Prejudice, starring Colin Firth, scored in Great Britain (it would prove an equal success in the U.S. the following year). But Austen's greatest hit of 1995 was Sense and Sensibility, an adaptation of her often-forgotten first novel. Not only did the film land on more than 100 10-best lists, but it helped propel Kate Winslet to stardom and made Emma Thompson the first person ever to follow an Oscar® for acting (for Howard's End in 1992) with one for writing.

Producer Lindsay Doran had first fallen in love with Austen's novel when she had briefly lived in England 25 years earlier. A child of Hollywood, Doran knew a good story when she saw it, but it took two decades for her to rise to a position as a producer that would allow her to shop the property around. After scoring with This Is Spinal Tap (1984) and Ghost (1990), she won a place with director Sydney Pollack's production company, Mirage Enterprises, where she worked on Dead Again (1991), co-starring Kenneth Branagh and Emma Thompson. Doran was impressed with Thompson's wit on the set. When Los Angeles public television aired Thompson, a sketch comedy series the actress had written as well as starred in, Doran felt she had found the perfect person to adapt Sense and Sensibility to the screen.

Thompson spent four years on the screenplay, going through countless story conferences and revisions. Gradually, she focused her story as much on the relationship between the two older Dashwood sisters as on their romantic dreams. At the time, she hoped Doran would cast real-life sisters Natasha and Joely Richardson, the daughters of Vanessa Redgrave. Meanwhile, Doran decided to offer the directing job to Taiwan-based Ang Lee. At first that seemed an odd choice, but she felt that films like The Wedding Banquet (1993) and Eat Drink Man Woman (1994) combined complex family relationships with social comedy much as Austen's novels did . Lee made his own suggestions on the script, often replacing lengthy dialogue scenes with visuals. He also suggested that Thompson would be perfect to play the older sister, Elinor. When she tried to argue that at 36 she was too old to play the 19-year-old character, he suggested raising her age to 27, which would make her more believable to modern audiences as a spinster.

Thompson had written the role of her love interest, Edward, with Hugh Grant in mind, and he agreed to play the role for lower than his usual fee since the film was only budgeted at $15 million. They had more trouble finding the right actress for Elinor's younger, more romantic sister, Marianne. Kate Winslet wanted the role, but had only been asked to read for a supporting part because Lee had not cared for her work in her previous film, Heavenly Creatures (1994). At the audition, she pretended her agent had told her she was reading for Marianne, then she nailed the part and won it based on a single reading.

During filming, Lee had some problems adjusting to the Western approach to filmmaking. In particular, he was not prepared to deal with actors who questioned direction and even made suggestions about shots. Back in his native Taiwan, he had been considered something of a directing god, and the actors there simply took his direction without a quibble. Some in the British cast had problems with his authoritarian approach. In particular, he seemed determined to have Grant deliver a performance unlike any he had given before. He was so critical, often railing about the actors in Chinese, that Grant took to calling him "The Brute" behind his back.

But Lee also made demands that deepened the film's meaning. He instructed Winslet to read novels and poetry from the era and report to him on them so that she could fully understand her character's romantic side. He also asked the actors to write letters to each other in character since letter writing was the principal means of communication in Austen's day. Perhaps his wisest suggestion was asking Winslet and Thompson to room together during filming so they could develop a sisterly bond. Both were going through painful breakups at the time -- Winslet from a boyfriend; Thompson from her husband -- and that brought them even closer. In fact, they remain friends to this day.

Whatever Lee did, it worked. Sense and Sensibility was a surprise hit, bringing in $135 million worldwide on its small budget. It also was one of the dominant films come awards time, picking up Best Picture honors from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), the National Board of Review, the Boston Film Critics, the Broadcast Film Critics and the Golden Globes. Thompson and Winslet won several acting honors, while Thompson was equally feted for her writing. The star and writer also enjoyed another more personal reward from the film. During shooting she fell in love with co-star Greg Wise, cast as the nobleman who loves and then spurns her sister. The two have a daughter, whom Thompson has referred to jokingly as "jane.com," and were finally married in 2003.

Producer: Lindsay Doran
Director: Ang Lee
Screenplay: Emma Thompson
Based on the novel by Jane Austen
Cinematography: Michael Coulter
Art Direction: Luciana Arrighi, Philip Alton
Music: Patrick Doyle
Principal Cast: Emma Thompson (Elinor Dashwood), Hugh Grant (Edward Ferrars), Kate Winslet (Marianne Dashwood), Alan Rickman (Colonel Brandon), Greg Wise (John Willoughby), Gemma Jones (Mrs. Dashwood), Elizabeth Spriggs (Mrs. Jennings), Imogen Stubbs (Lucy Steele).
C-137m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning.

by Frank Miller
Sense And Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

Lose your heart and come to your senses. Tagline for Sense and Sensibility Romantic comedy made a comeback in the mid-'90s, thanks largely to the re-discovery of Jane Austen, the British novelist famous for her stories of romance and manners. A film adaptation of Persuasion won critical claim earlier in 1995, while Clueless, a modernized version of Emma, made Alicia Silverstone a star the same year. Also that year, a television miniseries based on Pride and Prejudice, starring Colin Firth, scored in Great Britain (it would prove an equal success in the U.S. the following year). But Austen's greatest hit of 1995 was Sense and Sensibility, an adaptation of her often-forgotten first novel. Not only did the film land on more than 100 10-best lists, but it helped propel Kate Winslet to stardom and made Emma Thompson the first person ever to follow an Oscar® for acting (for Howard's End in 1992) with one for writing. Producer Lindsay Doran had first fallen in love with Austen's novel when she had briefly lived in England 25 years earlier. A child of Hollywood, Doran knew a good story when she saw it, but it took two decades for her to rise to a position as a producer that would allow her to shop the property around. After scoring with This Is Spinal Tap (1984) and Ghost (1990), she won a place with director Sydney Pollack's production company, Mirage Enterprises, where she worked on Dead Again (1991), co-starring Kenneth Branagh and Emma Thompson. Doran was impressed with Thompson's wit on the set. When Los Angeles public television aired Thompson, a sketch comedy series the actress had written as well as starred in, Doran felt she had found the perfect person to adapt Sense and Sensibility to the screen. Thompson spent four years on the screenplay, going through countless story conferences and revisions. Gradually, she focused her story as much on the relationship between the two older Dashwood sisters as on their romantic dreams. At the time, she hoped Doran would cast real-life sisters Natasha and Joely Richardson, the daughters of Vanessa Redgrave. Meanwhile, Doran decided to offer the directing job to Taiwan-based Ang Lee. At first that seemed an odd choice, but she felt that films like The Wedding Banquet (1993) and Eat Drink Man Woman (1994) combined complex family relationships with social comedy much as Austen's novels did . Lee made his own suggestions on the script, often replacing lengthy dialogue scenes with visuals. He also suggested that Thompson would be perfect to play the older sister, Elinor. When she tried to argue that at 36 she was too old to play the 19-year-old character, he suggested raising her age to 27, which would make her more believable to modern audiences as a spinster. Thompson had written the role of her love interest, Edward, with Hugh Grant in mind, and he agreed to play the role for lower than his usual fee since the film was only budgeted at $15 million. They had more trouble finding the right actress for Elinor's younger, more romantic sister, Marianne. Kate Winslet wanted the role, but had only been asked to read for a supporting part because Lee had not cared for her work in her previous film, Heavenly Creatures (1994). At the audition, she pretended her agent had told her she was reading for Marianne, then she nailed the part and won it based on a single reading. During filming, Lee had some problems adjusting to the Western approach to filmmaking. In particular, he was not prepared to deal with actors who questioned direction and even made suggestions about shots. Back in his native Taiwan, he had been considered something of a directing god, and the actors there simply took his direction without a quibble. Some in the British cast had problems with his authoritarian approach. In particular, he seemed determined to have Grant deliver a performance unlike any he had given before. He was so critical, often railing about the actors in Chinese, that Grant took to calling him "The Brute" behind his back. But Lee also made demands that deepened the film's meaning. He instructed Winslet to read novels and poetry from the era and report to him on them so that she could fully understand her character's romantic side. He also asked the actors to write letters to each other in character since letter writing was the principal means of communication in Austen's day. Perhaps his wisest suggestion was asking Winslet and Thompson to room together during filming so they could develop a sisterly bond. Both were going through painful breakups at the time -- Winslet from a boyfriend; Thompson from her husband -- and that brought them even closer. In fact, they remain friends to this day. Whatever Lee did, it worked. Sense and Sensibility was a surprise hit, bringing in $135 million worldwide on its small budget. It also was one of the dominant films come awards time, picking up Best Picture honors from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), the National Board of Review, the Boston Film Critics, the Broadcast Film Critics and the Golden Globes. Thompson and Winslet won several acting honors, while Thompson was equally feted for her writing. The star and writer also enjoyed another more personal reward from the film. During shooting she fell in love with co-star Greg Wise, cast as the nobleman who loves and then spurns her sister. The two have a daughter, whom Thompson has referred to jokingly as "jane.com," and were finally married in 2003. Producer: Lindsay Doran Director: Ang Lee Screenplay: Emma Thompson Based on the novel by Jane Austen Cinematography: Michael Coulter Art Direction: Luciana Arrighi, Philip Alton Music: Patrick Doyle Principal Cast: Emma Thompson (Elinor Dashwood), Hugh Grant (Edward Ferrars), Kate Winslet (Marianne Dashwood), Alan Rickman (Colonel Brandon), Greg Wise (John Willoughby), Gemma Jones (Mrs. Dashwood), Elizabeth Spriggs (Mrs. Jennings), Imogen Stubbs (Lucy Steele). C-137m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning. by Frank Miller

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Ang Lee was nominated for outstanding directorial achievement by the Directors Guild of America (1995).

Lindsay Doran was nominated for the 1995 Golden Laurel Award by the Producers Guild of America.

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Actress (Emma Thompson) from the Society of Texas Film Critics. Thompson was also a co-winner, along with Christopher McQuarrie for "The Usual Suspects" (USA/1995), of the Best Screenplay award.

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Screenplay from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Winner of the 1995 awards for Best Director and Best Screenplay from the New York Film Critics Circle.

Winner of the 1995 awards for Best Picture and Best Director from the National Board of Review. Emma Thompson also won Best Actress honors for her leading performances in "Sense and Sensibility" (USA/1995) and "Carrington" (France/United Kingdom/1995).

Winner of the 1995 awards for Best Picture and Best Screenplay from the Broadcast Film Critics Association.

Winner of the 1995 awards for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay from the Boston Society of Film Critics.

Winner of the eighth annual (1995) Scripter Award, given by the Friends of the University of Southern California Libraries, for the best film adaptation of a book.

Winner of the Golden Bear for Best Picture at the 1995 Berlin International Film Festival.

Expanded Release in United States February 16, 1996

Expanded Release in United States February 9, 1996

Expanded Release in United States January 12, 1996

Expanded Release in United States January 26, 1996

Expanded Release in United States January 5, 1996

Limited Release in United States December 13, 1995

Released in United States February 1996

Released in United States November 2001

Released in United States on Video June 25, 1996

Released in United States Winter December 13, 1995

Wide Release in United States January 19, 1996

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (opening night/in competition) February 15-26, 1996.

"Sense and Sensibility" was the first full-length novel by Jane Austen (1775-1817).

Emma Thompson won the 1995 award for Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published from the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Began shooting April 19, 1995.

Completed shooting September 29, 1995.

Expanded Release in United States January 5, 1996

Expanded Release in United States January 12, 1996

Wide Release in United States January 19, 1996

Expanded Release in United States January 26, 1996

Released in United States February 1996 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (opening night/in competition) February 15-26, 1996.)

Expanded Release in United States February 9, 1996

Expanded Release in United States February 16, 1996

Released in United States on Video June 25, 1996

Released in United States November 2001 (Shown at AFI Fest 2001: The American Film Institute Los Angeles International Film Festival (Tribute) November 1-11, 2001.)

Limited Release in United States December 13, 1995

Released in United States Winter December 13, 1995