Re-Animator


1h 24m 1985

Film Details

Also Known As
Reanimator
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror
Release Date
1985
Production Company
Glen Glenn Sound Company; Movie Magic
Distribution Company
Empire Pictures; Entertainment Film Distributors, Ltd.; Vestron Video

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Synopsis

Cast

Jeffrey Combs

Herbert West

Bruce Abbott

Dan Cain

Barbara Crampton

Megan Halsey

Robert Sampson

Dean Halsey

David Gale

Dr Carl Hill

Gerry Black

Mace

Carolyn-purdy Gordon

Dr Harrod

Peter Kent

Melvin The Re-Animated

Barbara Pieters

Nurse

Ian Patrick Williams

Swiss Professor

Bunny Summers

Swiss Woman Doctor

Al Berry

Dr Gruber

Derek Pendleton

1st Swiss Policeman

Gene Scherer

2nd Swiss Policeman

James Ellis

1st Psycho Wardrobe Guard

James Earl Cathay

2nd Psycho Wardrobe Guard

Hans Jonnason

Dr Hill'S Body Double

Greg Rose

Dr Hill'S Body Double

Annyce Holzman

E-R Patient Corpse

Velvet Debois

Slit Wrist Girl Corpse

Lawrence Lowe

Failed Operation Corpse

Robert Holcomb

Motorcycle Accident Corpse

Mike Filloon

Bullet Wound To The Face Corpse

Greg Reid

One-Arm Man Corpse

Jack Draheim

Tall Skinny Guy Corpse

Robert Pitzele

Bald O-R Corpse

Kim Deitch

Hospital Extra

Stephen Kienzle

Hospital Extra

Lillian Avery

Hospital Extra

Grace Keller

Hospital Extra

Ed Brummett

Hospital Extra

Peter Martin

Hospital Extra

Jerry Thomas

Hospital Extra

Steve Frakes

Hospital Extra

Michael Muscal

Hospital Extra

Tom Reeves

Hospital Extra

Bruce Curtis

Hospital Extra

Bob Johnnen

Hospital Extra

Greg Robbins

Hospital Extra

Robert Veilleuz

Hospital Extra

Timothy White

Hospital Extra

Linda Adams

Donna Wilkie

Walter Sims

Donna Matson

Alana Anderson

Carol Thomas

Janice Sims

Donald Olsen

Eric Gartner

Frederic Gartner

Lavonda Lawson

Kevin Indio Copeland

Ed Haggarty

Jeffrey Comstock

Carrie Shear

Ricky Woodard

Cathy Yuzna

Marta Goodfellow

Darryl Dick

Anna Coates

Lisa S Girolami

Terri Lynn

Steve Knudsen

Stuart Dennis

Sara Curtis

Crew

Mac Ahlberg

Director Of Photography

Brad Arensman

Post-Production Executive

Brian Armstrong

Camera Assistant

Michael Avery

Executive Producer

Richard Band

Music

Barrie Bergman

Production Associate

Rick Berman

Production Assistant

Dr. Ronald Berman

Medical Consultant

Martin Bernholz

Production Associate

Rob Bloch

Animal Handler

Becky Block

Set Decorator

David Boyd

Camera Assistant

Dan Bradley

Stunt Coordinator

John Buechler

Additional Makeup Effects

Robert A Burns

Art Direction

Ronini Burton

Costumer

Misty Carey

Production Coordinator

Steve Cassling

Production Assistant

Melonie Cleric

Special Effects Assistant

James Cook

Sound Rerecording

Scott Cook

Stunts

John Criswell

Special Effects Assistant

Bruce Cohn Curtis

Executive Producer

Richard Davison

Special Effects Assistant

Robert Dawson

Title Design

Gordon Day

Sound Rerecording

Anthony Doublin

Special Makeup Effects

Anthony Doublin

Special Effects

Robert Frederic Ebinger

Additional Photography

John Paul Fasal

Special Sound Effects

Mike Filloon

Stunts

Dana Ginsberg

Special Effects Assistant

Lisa S Girolami

Set Manager

R. Michael Givens

Camera Assistant

Stuart Gordon

Screenwriter

Bob Greenberg

Associate Producer

Cleve Hall

Special Makeup Effects

Deborah Hebert

Assistant Director

James D Herrick

Unit Manager

Gregory Jacobs

Dialogue Editor

John Jaulin

Special Effects

Kerry L Jennings

Medical Consultant

John Kwiatkowski

Sound Effects Editor

Jefrey Littman

Key Production Assistant

Sharon A Long

Key Makeup

H. P. Lovecraft

Source Material (From Novel)

Ray Lykins

Stunts

Paul Madoff

Production Assistant

Betty Martin Mallin

Post-Production Controller

Julie Maugers

Special Effects Assistant

Richard N. Mcguire

Special Effects Assistant

Eve Moss

Location Manager

Dennis Stuart Murphy

Executive In Charge Of Production

Dennis Murphy

Executive In Charge Of Production

Michael Muscal

Production Manager

Kenny Myers

Special Effects Assistant

John Naulin

Special Makeup Effects

Charles Nixon

Art Direction Associate

William J Norris

Screenwriter

Lorenzo O'brien

Production Assistant

Dean Okrand

Sound Rerecording

David Ordaz

Production Assistant

Dennis Paoli

Screenwriter

Steve Patino

Special Effects Assistant

Lee Percy

Editor

Gerald Quist

Special Makeup Effects Assistant

Robert Roda

Assistant Director

David Schmier

Director Of Photography 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Stephen Sealy

Camera Operator (Exteriors)

Jeffery Segal Segal

Special Effects Assistant

Therese Harding Shirley

Special Effects Assistant

Bonnie Sills

Production Assistant

Desiree Soto-vaughn

Special Makeup Effects

Charles Donald Storey

Associate Producer

Don Summer

Sound Recording

Tom Villano

Music Editor

George Wilbur

Stunts

Chris Witherspoon

Special Makeup Effects

Brian Yuzna

Producer

Cathy Yuzna

Production Associate

Film Details

Also Known As
Reanimator
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror
Release Date
1985
Production Company
Glen Glenn Sound Company; Movie Magic
Distribution Company
Empire Pictures; Entertainment Film Distributors, Ltd.; Vestron Video

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Articles

Re-Animator - RE-ANIMATOR - A Double Disc Edition of the Cult 1985 Horror Fave Based on a Tale by H.P. Lovecraft


Writer H.P. Lovecraft may have been critically derided during his short lifetime (he died in 1937 at the age of 47), but his works have gone on to enjoy a far-reaching conceptual influence in the realm of music, computer games, television, and films – with over fifty loose adaptations in the latter two fields alone. In 1985 Lovecraft's cinematic cache got one of its bigger bumps when Stuart Gordon, an artistic director in theater in Chicago, joined forces with aspiring producer Brian Yuzna and they placed H.P. Lovecraft's name prominently above the title of their feature debut, Re-Animator, a gory film that purposefully tried to out-do all the horror films released in the previous five years. The filmmakers accomplished their mission with an unrated film that shows popping eyeballs, flying intestines, gallons of blood, and an outrageous sexual transgression committed by a decapitated zombie head. Had they waited just two more years they would have had to contend with the release of Sam Raimi's Evil Dead II (1987), another unrated horror film that gleefully upped the ante for splatstick and also tapped into Lovecraftian ideas. But even now, over twenty years after it's original release, Re-Animator's moist stew of animated body parts manages to retain most of the vitality that garnered it an enthusiastic roar of applause and foot-stomping from an appreciative audience at the Cannes Film Festival, where it premiered, and where it was also praised by various critics.

Re-Animator tells the story of Dan Cain (Bruce Abbott), a medical student in love with the Dean's daughter, Barbara Crampton (Megan Halsey). Dan has a hard time seeing people die; we first meet him as he tries, and fails, to revive a patient. It is this important detail that helps explain some of the actions that follow and what make him, in Gordon's own words, the "unsung hero" of the film. Why would the director refer to the lead actor as the "unsung hero"? Because between Herbert West (played with manic zeal by Jeffrey Combs) and Dr. Carl Hill (as performed by David Gale with enough tongue-lolling lechery to estrange him from his actual wife), it's easy to forget who the hero is as we, instead, become entranced by the bloody fight that ensues between these two corpse-controlling egomaniacs. The whole affair has fun putting its own spin on the Frankenstein mythos, as well as updating the spectacle and theatrics of Grand Guignol.

Script-writer Dennis Paoli was originally asked by Gordon to use the six serialized Lovecraft pulp-fiction stories for Herbert West: Reanimator that were in the public domain with several half-hour television episodes in mind. But then television formats seemed to switch over from favoring half-hour episodes to preferring stand-alone hour-long episodes, and Paoli began combining concepts from these stories into one bigger project to fill out the hour. It is at this point that Yuzna hopped aboard, and he wanted to make a feature-length film. So the extrapolations continued with the help of William J. Morris and Gordon – and the end result was a two-and-a-half-hour long beast that was all shot between Thanksgiving and Christmas of 1983. Both Gordon and Yuzna credit editor Lee Percy for his work in pairing Re-Animator down to an economical 86 minutes in length, which sacrificed a dream sequence and a bit about hypnosis, among other things, but which helped push the film forward at an unflagging rate. Ironically, a rated version would later be released that cut out the especially gory bits and used many of the original extended sequences for a version that was actually longer than the unrated cut.

I'll resist the great temptation to make a re-animation pun on how often Re-Animator has enjoyed being re-released in various formats. I still have my 1995 10th anniversary Elite Entertainment "letterboxed edition" laser disc, which was then tweaked again by Elite as a "Millennium Edition" dvd, and which is now, again, being re-released by Anchor Bay with a comprehensive double-dvd set that includes everything that ever preceded it along with a new featurette called Re-Animator Resurrectus. The Anchor Bay also includes, if you get it new with packaging intact, a syringe-shaped, green-fluid-filled highlighter (presumably to use in your studies instead of a pencil, which snaps easily – as we see in the film).

To recap the extras: the aforementioned featurette (70-mins), an interview with Gordon and Yuzna (48 mins), an interview with writer Dennis Paoli (11 mins), an interview with composer Richard Band (14 mins), a music discussion with Richard Band (15 mins), an interview with Fangoria editor Tony Timpone (4 mins), deleted scenes (3 mins), extended scenes (24 mins), trailer, tv spots, production stills gallery, behind-the-scenes still gallery, "fun on the set" still gallery, posters and advertising gallery, storyboard gallery, Stuart Gordon bio, and two DVD-ROM features: the film screenplay and the original Lovecraft story for Herbert West, Reanimator. The Anchor Bay dvd release presents the film in its original aspect ratio of 1.85:1, with three different audio formats (DTS 5.1, Dolby Digital 5.1, Dolby Digital 2.0), and the feature also has two different audio commentaries available, one with Stuart Gordon, and one with Brian Yuzna, Bruce Abbot, Jeffrey Combs, Barbara Crampton, and Robert Sampson.

It's a lot to digest, but just think: the other script competing for Yuzna's feature-debut attention was a story about a guy on death row who escapes by being reincarnated as a potato, while Gordon's other competing project of that time surrounded the idea of a jealous dog trying to kill his owner's newborn baby and embroiling the both in a battle of wits. I'm glad they both found Herbert West instead.

For more information about Re-Animator, visit Anchor Bay To order Re-Animator, go to TCM Shopping.

by Pablo Kjolseth
Re-Animator - Re-Animator - A Double Disc Edition Of The Cult 1985 Horror Fave Based On A Tale By H.p. Lovecraft

Re-Animator - RE-ANIMATOR - A Double Disc Edition of the Cult 1985 Horror Fave Based on a Tale by H.P. Lovecraft

Writer H.P. Lovecraft may have been critically derided during his short lifetime (he died in 1937 at the age of 47), but his works have gone on to enjoy a far-reaching conceptual influence in the realm of music, computer games, television, and films – with over fifty loose adaptations in the latter two fields alone. In 1985 Lovecraft's cinematic cache got one of its bigger bumps when Stuart Gordon, an artistic director in theater in Chicago, joined forces with aspiring producer Brian Yuzna and they placed H.P. Lovecraft's name prominently above the title of their feature debut, Re-Animator, a gory film that purposefully tried to out-do all the horror films released in the previous five years. The filmmakers accomplished their mission with an unrated film that shows popping eyeballs, flying intestines, gallons of blood, and an outrageous sexual transgression committed by a decapitated zombie head. Had they waited just two more years they would have had to contend with the release of Sam Raimi's Evil Dead II (1987), another unrated horror film that gleefully upped the ante for splatstick and also tapped into Lovecraftian ideas. But even now, over twenty years after it's original release, Re-Animator's moist stew of animated body parts manages to retain most of the vitality that garnered it an enthusiastic roar of applause and foot-stomping from an appreciative audience at the Cannes Film Festival, where it premiered, and where it was also praised by various critics. Re-Animator tells the story of Dan Cain (Bruce Abbott), a medical student in love with the Dean's daughter, Barbara Crampton (Megan Halsey). Dan has a hard time seeing people die; we first meet him as he tries, and fails, to revive a patient. It is this important detail that helps explain some of the actions that follow and what make him, in Gordon's own words, the "unsung hero" of the film. Why would the director refer to the lead actor as the "unsung hero"? Because between Herbert West (played with manic zeal by Jeffrey Combs) and Dr. Carl Hill (as performed by David Gale with enough tongue-lolling lechery to estrange him from his actual wife), it's easy to forget who the hero is as we, instead, become entranced by the bloody fight that ensues between these two corpse-controlling egomaniacs. The whole affair has fun putting its own spin on the Frankenstein mythos, as well as updating the spectacle and theatrics of Grand Guignol. Script-writer Dennis Paoli was originally asked by Gordon to use the six serialized Lovecraft pulp-fiction stories for Herbert West: Reanimator that were in the public domain with several half-hour television episodes in mind. But then television formats seemed to switch over from favoring half-hour episodes to preferring stand-alone hour-long episodes, and Paoli began combining concepts from these stories into one bigger project to fill out the hour. It is at this point that Yuzna hopped aboard, and he wanted to make a feature-length film. So the extrapolations continued with the help of William J. Morris and Gordon – and the end result was a two-and-a-half-hour long beast that was all shot between Thanksgiving and Christmas of 1983. Both Gordon and Yuzna credit editor Lee Percy for his work in pairing Re-Animator down to an economical 86 minutes in length, which sacrificed a dream sequence and a bit about hypnosis, among other things, but which helped push the film forward at an unflagging rate. Ironically, a rated version would later be released that cut out the especially gory bits and used many of the original extended sequences for a version that was actually longer than the unrated cut. I'll resist the great temptation to make a re-animation pun on how often Re-Animator has enjoyed being re-released in various formats. I still have my 1995 10th anniversary Elite Entertainment "letterboxed edition" laser disc, which was then tweaked again by Elite as a "Millennium Edition" dvd, and which is now, again, being re-released by Anchor Bay with a comprehensive double-dvd set that includes everything that ever preceded it along with a new featurette called Re-Animator Resurrectus. The Anchor Bay also includes, if you get it new with packaging intact, a syringe-shaped, green-fluid-filled highlighter (presumably to use in your studies instead of a pencil, which snaps easily – as we see in the film). To recap the extras: the aforementioned featurette (70-mins), an interview with Gordon and Yuzna (48 mins), an interview with writer Dennis Paoli (11 mins), an interview with composer Richard Band (14 mins), a music discussion with Richard Band (15 mins), an interview with Fangoria editor Tony Timpone (4 mins), deleted scenes (3 mins), extended scenes (24 mins), trailer, tv spots, production stills gallery, behind-the-scenes still gallery, "fun on the set" still gallery, posters and advertising gallery, storyboard gallery, Stuart Gordon bio, and two DVD-ROM features: the film screenplay and the original Lovecraft story for Herbert West, Reanimator. The Anchor Bay dvd release presents the film in its original aspect ratio of 1.85:1, with three different audio formats (DTS 5.1, Dolby Digital 5.1, Dolby Digital 2.0), and the feature also has two different audio commentaries available, one with Stuart Gordon, and one with Brian Yuzna, Bruce Abbot, Jeffrey Combs, Barbara Crampton, and Robert Sampson. It's a lot to digest, but just think: the other script competing for Yuzna's feature-debut attention was a story about a guy on death row who escapes by being reincarnated as a potato, while Gordon's other competing project of that time surrounded the idea of a jealous dog trying to kill his owner's newborn baby and embroiling the both in a battle of wits. I'm glad they both found Herbert West instead. For more information about Re-Animator, visit Anchor Bay To order Re-Animator, go to TCM Shopping. by Pablo Kjolseth

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer December 13, 1985

Released in United States on Video June 1988

Released in United States Summer December 13, 1985

Released in United States on Video June 1988