The Paper


1h 52m 1994

Brief Synopsis

Workaholic New York City tabloid editor Henry Hackett loves the adrenaline rush his job gives him, but the long hours and lousy salary are starting to grate on his wife Martha. With the paper facing cutbacks and his wife pregnant, Hackett contemplates taking a more sedate job with a more respectable

Film Details

Also Known As
Detrás de la noticia, Paper, Press-stopp!
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)/UNIVERSAL PICTURES
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Synopsis

Workaholic New York City tabloid editor Henry Hackett loves the adrenaline rush his job gives him, but the long hours and lousy salary are starting to grate on his wife Martha. With the paper facing cutbacks and his wife pregnant, Hackett contemplates taking a more sedate job with a more respectable paper, but a double murder and the racial profiling of two teen suspects draws him back in in order to break one more hot story.

Cast

Tony Hoty

Hap Hairston

Himself

Siobhan Fallon Hogan

Vincent D'arbouze

Lynne Thigpen

Aloysius R Burke

Myra Taylor

Jerry Rosa

Himself

Shannon E Donohue

Joanna Molloy

Herself

Larry Hackett

Himself

Joseph Pentangelo

Jason Alexander

Stephen Koepp

Sally-jane Heit

Amos Grunebaum

James Ritz

Herb Lovelle

Spalding Gray

Ed Jupp

Mike G. Sheehan

Lee Kimball

Thomas Long

Michael Countryman

Lou Colasuonno

Himself

Mike Mcalary

Himself

Pete Hamill

Himself

John Miller

Himself

Gary Dourdan

Jeannie Williams

Herself

Bob Costas

Himself

Yvonne Warden

Jeffrey H Kaufman

Cheryl Howard

Robert Duvall

Louisa Marie

Donna Hanover

Herself

Amelia Campbell

James Nestor

Jean Speegle Howard

Jane Hanson

Herself

Jack Mcgee

Carol Ann Donohue

Catherine O'hara

Chuck Scarborough

Himself

Rance Howard

Erika Johnson

Victor Truro

Richard Price

Himself

David J Birnbach

John F Rhodes

Himself

Kurt Loder

Himself

Paul Geier

Daniel Kenney

Linda Stasi

Herself

Frank Inzerillo

Scott Rosenstock

Lead Person

William Kunstler

Himself

Geoffrey Owens

Rosanna Scotto

Herself

Glenn Close

Herbert Rubens

Harsh Nayyar

William Prince

Clint Howard

Bobo Lewis

Julie Rowen

John Eric Bentley

Roma Maffia

Maureen Goldfedder

Karen Church

Michael Michael

Jill Hennessy

Brenda Blackmon

Herself

Edward Hibbert

Herb Krystall

Michael Moran

Valerie Coleman

Herself

Jan Mickens

Vickie Thomas

Michael Keaton

Jim Meskimen

Jason Robards Jr.

Graydon Carter

Himself

Debbie Gross

Herself

Wylie Weeks

Bruce Altman

Miles Watson

Jack O'connell

Joe Viviani

James Colby

Diane Gnagnarelli

Jack Kehoe

Dini Von Mueffling

Herself

Augusta Dabney

Randy Quaid

Marisa Tomei

Divina Cook

Cedric Young

Christi Hatcher

Benny Benowitz

Cynthia Carter

Herself

Jacqueline Murphy

Crew

Maher Ahmad

Art Director

Glenn Allen

Assistant Editor

Billy Anganos

Stunts

Donald Angst

Electrician

Michael Anthony

Production Assistant

Antony Baldasare

On-Set Dresser

Guy Barresi

Assistant Editor

Thomas Beattie

Driver

Michael Bedard

Video

Michael Lee Benson

On-Set Dresser

Jeffrey T Bernstein

Production Assistant

Peter Betulia

Grip

Brenda Blackmon

Other

Joan G. Bostwick

Production Assistant

Douglas Botnick

Music

Nancy Boytos-amanuel

On-Set Dresser

John Brady

Driver

Richard Brick

Thanks

David Brian Brown

Hair

Fern Buchner

Makeup

Paul Bucossi

Stunts

Pete Bucossi

Stunts

Milton Buras

Hair

Eva Z. Cabrera

Script Supervisor

Nancy Cabrera

Foley Artist

Kristin Cameron

Production Assistant

Jay Cannold

Accountant

Danny Canovas

Sound

Jaymie Cantavero

Other

Cynthia Carter

Other

Graydon Carter

Other

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

John Cenatiempo

Stunts

Karen Church

Casting Associate

Anthony Ciccolini

Sound Editor

Hugo Cimmelli

Special Effects Coordinator

Richard Clark

Driver

Carl Clifford

Unit Production Manager

Lou Colasuonno

Other

Valerie Coleman

Other

Joseph R Collins

Assistant Camera Operator

O J Connell Iii

Other

William M Connor

Assistant Director

David Cooney

Art Assistant

Kathleen Corgan

Location Assistant

Joe Coscia

Hair Stylist

Danny Coss

Production Assistant

Bob Costas

Other

Patrick Cousins

Electrician

Margaret Craven

Production Assistant

Ralph Crowley

Electrician

James Davies

Video

Eva Davy

Other

Andrew J. Day

Best Boy

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

June Decamp

Other

Eric Dilucente

Dga Trainee

Rick Dior

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Ellen Doak

Other

Gerald Donlan

Adr Editor

Robert T Donovan

Driver

Norman Douglass

Stunts

Lamont Dozier

Song

Dean Drabin

Adr Mixer

Lauren Draper

Technical Advisor

Michael Dunn

Craft Service

Tony Dunne

Construction Coordinator

Robert Dwyer

Driver

Dan Edelstein

Foley Editor

Ann L Edgworth

Props Assistant

Karen E. Etcoff

Casting

William Farber

Gaffer

George Fares

Producer

Robert Featherstone

Driver

Louis Ferraioli

Driver

Eugene Ferrara

Technical Advisor

Irene Ferrari

Wardrobe

M Findling

Song

Mo Flam

Gaffer

Jim Flamberg

Music Editor

Richard Formby

Song

Richard Friedlander

Assistant Editor

Lisa Frucht

Wardrobe Assistant

Ellen Gannon

Assistant Production Coordinator

John Gaskin

Production Accountant

Marvin Gaye

Song Performer

Peter Gelfman

On-Set Dresser

Ed Gleason

Video

Diane Gnagarelli

Dialogue Coach

Nansea Lee Goldberg

Assistant

Brian Grazer

Producer

Melvin Green

Carpenter

Alonzo Greer

Production Assistant

Susanna Griffith

Casting Associate

John Grimolizzi

Construction

Debbie Gross

Other

David Gulick

Property Master

Wendi Haas-hammond

Production Coordinator

Larry Hackett

Other

Peter G Hackman

Camera

Ann Hadsell

Adr

Hap Hairston

Other

Todd Hallowell

Executive Producer

Todd Hallowell

Production Designer

Todd Hallowell

Song

Pete Hamill

Other

Dan Hanley

Editor

Donna Hanover

Other

Jane Hanson

Other

John Patrick Hayden

Stunts

Jack Hayes

Original Music

Kevin Henry

Negative Cutting

Don Hewitt

Stunts

Michael Hill

Editor

Janet Hirshenson

Casting

Trish Hofmann

Art Department Coordinator

Brian Holland

Song

Edward Holland

Song

D Hussman

Song

Edward Iacobelli

Transportation Captain

Edward Iacobelli

Driver

Ray Iacobelli

Driver

Joseph Iberti

Location Manager

Laura Iler

Props Assistant

Don Imus

Thanks

Jane Jenkins

Casting

Tom Jones

Song Performer

Jerry Kadar

On-Set Dresser

Richard S Kamin

Carpenter

Jenny Kane

Electrician

Chaim Kantor

Assistant Camera Operator

Peter Kember

Song

Daniel Boy Kenney

On-Set Dresser

Todd Kleitsch

Makeup Assistant

David Koepp

Screenplay

David Koepp

Coproducer

Stephen Koepp

Screenplay

Elise Konialian

Assistant

Paul Kramer

Location Assistant

Tom Kramer

Music Editor

Kenneth Kroll

Accounting Assistant

Herb Krystall

Other

William Kunstler

Other

Jim Lang

Song

Lester Lanin

Song Performer

Sal Lanza

Grip

Robert Lapine

Driver

Kay Lark

Assistant

Michael Laudati

Makeup

Donald J. Lee

Assistant Director

Vincent M Lee

Technical Advisor

Lisa J Levine

Adr Editor

Clay Liversidge

Electrician

Karen Lloyd

Wardrobe

Kurt Loder

Other

Edward W Lowry

Grip

Martin Lowry

Grip

Jane Luttenberger

Music Supervisor

Bruce Maccallum

Camera Operator

Brian Macdonald

Production Assistant

Steve Mack

Stunts

Milton Maldonado

Thanks

Bobby Mancuso

Assistant Camera Operator

Sergio Marmeolejo

Song

Carillo Roman Marquez

Song

Neal Martz

Makeup

Mike Mcalary

Other

Anthony Mcguinness

Grip

Victor Meich

Driver

Danny Michael

Sound Mixer

Anastas Michos

Steadicam Operator

John Miller

Other

Eytan Mirsky

Sound

Joanna Molloy

Other

Richard Montgomery

Grip

Michelle Morrissey

Production Supervisor

Brett Moss

Other

Thomas A Mulino

Dialogue Editor

Raymond Murphy

On-Set Dresser

Yvette Nabel

Sound

Don Nace

Other

Rob O' Neill

Driver

Randy Newman

Music

Randy Newman

Song

Randy Newman

Song Performer

Mark Nicholas

Carpenter

Sean O'brien

Grip

Brendan C O'connor

Office Assistant

Tom O'halloran

Assistant Camera Operator

Candi Orsini

Stunts

Al Palmer

Other

John Panuccio

Best Boy

Janet Paparazzo

Stunts

Addison Pettit

Carpenter

Bill Pine

Color Timer

Aldric Porter

Associate Producer

Aldric Porter

Assistant Director

Robert Prate

Grip

Thomas Prate

Key Grip

Richard Price

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Detrás de la noticia, Paper, Press-stopp!
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)/UNIVERSAL PICTURES
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Award Nominations

Best Original Song

1994

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Expanded Release in United States April 1, 1994

Released in United States on Video October 19, 1994

Released in United States Spring March 18, 1994

Wide Release in United States March 25, 1994

Began shooting July 19, 1993.

Completed shooting September 30, 1993.

Released in United States Spring March 18, 1994

Wide Release in United States March 25, 1994

Expanded Release in United States April 1, 1994

Released in United States on Video October 19, 1994