Nixon


3h 10m 1995

Brief Synopsis

The controversial president struggles to maintain his integrity and sanity in a shifting political landscape.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Biography
Historical
Period
Political
Release Date
1995
Production Company
David Manley
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 10m

Synopsis

Although he's one of the most chronicled public figures of the 20th century, Richard Milhous Nixon remains an enigma to many, his decisions, motives and behavior often shrouded in mystery. With the ill-fated 1972 Watergate break-in and its tragic aftermath--culminating in the President's 1974 resignation--as its focus, NIXON examines its subject's complex life, including his difficult youth in Southern California and often troubled relationship with wife Pat. We also see Nixon's incredible political life, during which he held the offices of Congressman at age 33, Senator at 37, and Vice-President at 39, before losing the Presidential election in 1960 and the California gubernatorial race in 1962, making his startling comeback six years later to win two terms as President. With the inevitability of classical tragedy, Nixon's political career finally crumbles beneath the weight of his past, his ambitions, and his blindness to events just outside his often remarkable range of vision.

Crew

Kimberly Adams-galligan

Assistant Costume Designer

Michael Aguilar

Visual Effects

Henry Alberti

Set Designer

Mary Anderson

Adr Editor

Fred Arbegast

Art Department

J H Arrufat

Dialogue Editor

David Baldwin

Sound Effects Editor

Sidney R. Baldwin

Photography

Gregg Baxter

Sound Editor

Lisa S Beasley

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Lon Bender

Audio

Brian Berdan

Editor

Lucas Bielan

Camera Assistant

John Blake

Makeup Artist

Lee Blasingame

Camera Assistant

Sashy Bogdanovich

Research Assistant

Merideth Boswell

Set Decorator

Sarah Bowen

Art Department Coordinator

Steve Bowerman

Boom Operator

Mark Bridges

Assistant Costume Designer

Jim Brookshire

Dialogue Editor

Bill Brown

Post-Production Supervisor

Jason Bryant

Art Assistant

Jon Bush

Swing Gang

Alexander Butterfield

Consultant

Dennis Butterworth

Other

Ian Calip

Office Assistant

Budd Carr

Music Producer

Chris Centrella

Key Grip

Jennifer Clark

Accounting Assistant

Christian Clarke

Set Production Assistant

Gary Clause

Props

Mindy Cole

Assistant

William Conner

Other

Joseph Conti

Visual Effects

Virginia Cook-mcgowan

Dialogue Editor

Bryan Cooke

Visual Effects

Cydney Cornell

Hairdresser

Hank Corwin

Editor

Chris David

Rerecording

Peter Davidian

Lighting

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

John Dean

Consultant

Ann Marie Digioia

Office Assistant

Dino Dimuro

Sound Effects Editor

Amy Dunn

Music Supervisor

Rickley W Dunn

Assistant Sound Editor

Lou Economides

Production

Steve Ellsworth

Costumes

David Emmerichs

Steadicam Operator

David Emmerichs

Camera Operator

Victor Ennis

Assistant Sound Editor

John Paul Filo

Archival Footage

Jeff Flach

Location Manager

Carol Flaisher

Location Manager

Christine C Fransen

Production Coordinator

Erica Froker

Camera Assistant

Kevin M Gannon

Props Assistant

Michael R Gannon

Assistant Property Master

Bobby J Garren

Other

Nerses Gezalyan

Foley Artist

Scott Gillis

Key Grip

Nocolas Goddet

Set Production Assistant

Carmine Goglia

Other

Wayne D Goldwyn

Photography

Ann Goulder

Casting Associate

Laura Graham

Adr Editor

Tricia Gray

Costumer

Dori Greenberg

Set Production Assistant

Scott Griffin

Apprentice

Basil Bryant Grillo

Accounting Assistant

Mindy Hall

Makeup Artist

Todd Hall

Other

Dan Halsted

Coproducer

Eric Hamburg

Coproducer

Andrew Harland

Special Thanks To

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Karen Higgings

Other

Chris Hogan

Sound Effects

Christer Hokanson

Digital Effects Supervisor

Mike Holowach

Swing Gang

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Deirdre Horgan

Script Supervisor

Richard Hornung

Costume Designer

Michael Hoskinson

Foley Editor

Nicholas Irwin

Accounting Assistant

Pat Jackson

Dialogue Editor

Craig Jaeger

Foley Editor

Chris Jargo

Adr Editor

Jennifer Neysa Jew

Assistant Editor

Robert Kaiser

Color Timer

Marty Kassab-chaney

Video Assist/Playback

Stanley Kastner

Rerecording

Peter J Kelly

Set Designer

Victor Kempster

Production Designer

Dean M King

Best Boy

Eddie Kish

Assistant

Carlin Kmetz

Matte Painter

Roger Knight

On-Set Dresser

Michelle Kurpaska

Costume Supervisor

Mark Lanza

Sound Effects Editor

Albert Leon

Set Production Assistant

Mike Levitre

Art Department

Heidi Levitt

Casting

Chris Loudon

Effects Coordinator

Sean R Maccaul

Other

J. Fred Macdonald

Archival Footage

Nancy Macleod

Sound Effects Editor

David Macmillan

Sound Mixer

Kelly Mahan-jaramillo

Music

David Manley

Production Insurance

Arthur Manson

Advisor

Louis Marquis

Other

Jo Martin

Editor

Paul Massey

Rerecording

Mary Mastro

Hair Stylist

Richard F Mays

Art Director

Hugh Mccallum

Grip

Alan Z Mccurdy

Assistant Editor

Stacey S Mcintosh

Construction Coordinator

William T Mckane

Rigging Gaffer

Michael A Mendez

Best Boy Grip

Ryan T Mennealy

Art Assistant

David L Merrill

Grip

Carla Meyer

Dialect Coach

Monika Mikkelsen

Casting Associate

Deedee Montesanto

Set Costumer

Maggie Murphy

Assistant Director

Shawn Murphy

Music

Sue Schnulle Murphy

Accounting Assistant

Samuel Nalbone

Construction Manager

Marilyn Nave

Production Coordinator

Carol Ness

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Sylvia Nestor

Music Supervisor

John Neufeld

Music Arranger

John Newman

Consultant

Thomas J Norberg

Associate Editor

Sandra Noriega

Production Assistant

Valerie O'brien

Set Costumer

Darrin O'hanlon

Other

Alex Olivares

Avid Editor

Kelly Oxford

Sound Effects Editor

John T Page

Other

Kevin Patterson

Other

Michelle Pazer

Assistant Sound Editor

Amy Pearson

Assistant Production Coordinator

William Petrotta

Property Master

Brian Pierson

Audio

David Pomier

Location Assistant

Darrin C Porter

Electrician

Robert A Preston

Dolly Grip

Meta Puttkammer

Dga Trainee

Brad Rea

Dolly Grip

Dr. Christian Renna

Medic

John Rice

Assistant Sound Editor

Charlene Richards

Adr Mixer

Bruce Richardson

Dialogue Editor

Robert Richardson

Director Of Photography

John D Riley

Set Production Assistant

Stephen J Rivele

Screenplay

Wayne Roberts

Transportation Captain

Scott Andrew Robertson

Assistant Director

Conception Roca

Production Assistant

Paul M Rohrbaugh

Other

Denyse Rossi

Accountant

Sarah Rothenberg

Dialogue Editor

Richard Rutowski

Associate Producer

David Sardi

Assistant Director

Jerry Sargent

Props

Christopher Wells Scheer

Consultant

Robert Scheer

Consultant

Erica Schwartz

Special Thanks To

John P Sears

Consultant

David Sharlein

Grip

Ed Simon

Foley Artist

Tom Skulski

Grip

Fx Smith

Makeup Artist

Gordon Smith

Makeup Artist

Rachel C Smith

Set Production Assistant

Richard Sobin

Assistant Camera Operator

David Stanke

Assistant Sound Editor

Kirk Starbird

Art Department

Wylie Stateman

Sound Editor

Barbara Ann Stein

Other

James Stellar

Assistant Editor

Rob Stevens

Construction

Sunday Stevens

Assistant

F Lee Stone

Special Effects

Oliver Stone

Producer

Oliver Stone

Screenplay

Cecil W Stoughton

Archival Footage

Chris Strong

Lighting Technician

Jeffrey Ray Strong

Electrician

Mark Sullivan

Matte Painter

Bill Summers

Grip

Jesse Tango

Electrician

Gregor Tavenner

Assistant Camera Operator

Kayla Thames

Assistant Location Manager

Annie Tien

Assistant

Clayton Townsend

Producer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Biography
Historical
Period
Political
Release Date
1995
Production Company
David Manley
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 10m

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1995
Anthony Hopkins

Best Dramatic Score

1995

Best Original Screenplay

1995

Best Supporting Actress

1995
Joan Allen

Articles

Nixon


Over the last generation, no American filmmaker has proved less daunted by addressing politically loaded subject matter than Oliver Stone. From the moment in the early '90s when Stone announced his intentions to mount a film biography of the only U.S. President to resign his office, anticipatory protest came from those who thought the project would only serve to demonize Richard M. Nixon. Other voices expressed their reservations that the film wouldn't go far enough in doing so. Ultimately, Stone's Nixon (1995) plays out like epic tragedy, and presents the 37th President as an ambitious but flawed man whose own insecurities not only fueled his rise to the highest seat of power, but lead him to tarnish his legacy.

In a 1995 interview with Salon.com, Stone was asked if he sought to "generate a certain buzz" with his choice of casting Anthony Hopkins, a Welshman with no particular physical resemblance to Nixon, in the title role. "I wouldn't characterize that as a motivation," he responded. "It works. He feels like Nixon. In The Remains of the Day [(1993)], I felt his sense of isolation, his sense of sadness. In Shadowlands [(1993)], there was an emotional fullness to his character. Hopkins is a complete actor. He's not like some of these by-the-numbers TV actors who have their bag of tricks." The actor passed on heavy make-up and obvious mimicry, but captured enough of Nixon's constrictive body language to convey his repression and loneliness.

Stepping off from the point in 1972 when the White House backed "plumbers" were caught burglarizing the Democratic National Headquarters at the Watergate Hotel, and concluding with the demise of the Nixon Administration two years later, Stone navigates the film's three hour running time in a non-linear fashion. The director's narrative interweaves the increasing desperation within the Nixon White House in its final days with the formative events in his life. From the strict and demanding upbringing at the hands of his Quaker mother (Mary Steenburgen) to the congressional career marked by the relentless red-baiting that paved his way to the Vice-Presidency to the embittering rivalry with John F. Kennedy, Stone made genuine effort to lend his subject dimension.

The resentment of JFK resonates through the course of the film, and culminates in a scene where Nixon sadly contemplates JFK's White House portrait and declaims "When they see you, they see want they want to be. When they see me, they see who they are." In an interview, Hopkins agreed that "it sums up his whole attitude about himself, Kennedy and the public who never loved him like he needed, but he could never had said such a thing. Not Nixon. If he had been that self-aware, he would not have been so miserable about it. Perception lightens our load."

Hopkins' efforts were complemented by those of Joan Allen, who had been working under film critics' radar for a decade before her performance as long-suffering First Lady Pat Nixon. Delivering a characterization that was surprisingly subtle yet emotionally complex, Allen garnered her first Oscar® nomination. Nixon would receive four Oscar® nominations altogether, with the balance going to Hopkins, John Williams' score, and the screenplay authored by Stone, Stephen J. Rivele and Christopher Wilkinson.

Another of the film's virtues is the large and talented roster of actors assembled to portray the major players in Watergate and the other key events of Nixon's career. The long list includes Powers Boothe (Alexander Haig), Paul Sorvino (Henry Kissinger), E.G. Marshall (John Mitchell), Bob Hoskins (J. Edgar Hoover), James Woods (H.R. Haldeman), J.T. Walsh (John Ehrlichman), Ed Harris (E. Howard Hunt), David Hyde Pierce (John Dean), Edward Herrmann (Nelson Rockefeller) and David Paymer (Ron Ziegler).

Critics of the film mostly leveled their complaints at Stone's scenario where dramatic license trumped historical accuracy, but the director, in a 1997 interview, expressed his own surprise at his film's sympathetic leanings towards its subject. "[A]t the end of the day it was really clear that a lot of the problems of Richard Nixon were really personal," he stated. "He distorted himself, in a sense. Instead of taking grace from power and doing something better with his power, he distorted into a darker side. That's what was interesting about the man."

Producer: Oliver Stone, Clayton Townsend, Andrew G. Vajna, Dan Halsted, Eric Hamburg, Richard Rutowski
Director: Oliver Stone
Screenplay: Stephen J. Rivele, Christopher Wilkinson, Oliver Stone
Cinematography: Robert Richardson
Film Editing: Brian Berdan, Hank Corwin
Art Direction: Richard F. Mays, Donald Woodruff, Margery Zweizig
Music: John Williams
Cast: Anthony Hopkins (Richard Nixon), Joan Allen (Pat Nixon), Powers Boothe (Alexander Haig), Ed Harris (E. Howard Hunt), Bob Hoskins (J. Edgar Hoover), E.G. Marshall (John Mitchell).
BW& C-192m. Letterboxed.

by Jay S. Steinberg
Nixon

Nixon

Over the last generation, no American filmmaker has proved less daunted by addressing politically loaded subject matter than Oliver Stone. From the moment in the early '90s when Stone announced his intentions to mount a film biography of the only U.S. President to resign his office, anticipatory protest came from those who thought the project would only serve to demonize Richard M. Nixon. Other voices expressed their reservations that the film wouldn't go far enough in doing so. Ultimately, Stone's Nixon (1995) plays out like epic tragedy, and presents the 37th President as an ambitious but flawed man whose own insecurities not only fueled his rise to the highest seat of power, but lead him to tarnish his legacy. In a 1995 interview with Salon.com, Stone was asked if he sought to "generate a certain buzz" with his choice of casting Anthony Hopkins, a Welshman with no particular physical resemblance to Nixon, in the title role. "I wouldn't characterize that as a motivation," he responded. "It works. He feels like Nixon. In The Remains of the Day [(1993)], I felt his sense of isolation, his sense of sadness. In Shadowlands [(1993)], there was an emotional fullness to his character. Hopkins is a complete actor. He's not like some of these by-the-numbers TV actors who have their bag of tricks." The actor passed on heavy make-up and obvious mimicry, but captured enough of Nixon's constrictive body language to convey his repression and loneliness. Stepping off from the point in 1972 when the White House backed "plumbers" were caught burglarizing the Democratic National Headquarters at the Watergate Hotel, and concluding with the demise of the Nixon Administration two years later, Stone navigates the film's three hour running time in a non-linear fashion. The director's narrative interweaves the increasing desperation within the Nixon White House in its final days with the formative events in his life. From the strict and demanding upbringing at the hands of his Quaker mother (Mary Steenburgen) to the congressional career marked by the relentless red-baiting that paved his way to the Vice-Presidency to the embittering rivalry with John F. Kennedy, Stone made genuine effort to lend his subject dimension. The resentment of JFK resonates through the course of the film, and culminates in a scene where Nixon sadly contemplates JFK's White House portrait and declaims "When they see you, they see want they want to be. When they see me, they see who they are." In an interview, Hopkins agreed that "it sums up his whole attitude about himself, Kennedy and the public who never loved him like he needed, but he could never had said such a thing. Not Nixon. If he had been that self-aware, he would not have been so miserable about it. Perception lightens our load." Hopkins' efforts were complemented by those of Joan Allen, who had been working under film critics' radar for a decade before her performance as long-suffering First Lady Pat Nixon. Delivering a characterization that was surprisingly subtle yet emotionally complex, Allen garnered her first Oscar® nomination. Nixon would receive four Oscar® nominations altogether, with the balance going to Hopkins, John Williams' score, and the screenplay authored by Stone, Stephen J. Rivele and Christopher Wilkinson. Another of the film's virtues is the large and talented roster of actors assembled to portray the major players in Watergate and the other key events of Nixon's career. The long list includes Powers Boothe (Alexander Haig), Paul Sorvino (Henry Kissinger), E.G. Marshall (John Mitchell), Bob Hoskins (J. Edgar Hoover), James Woods (H.R. Haldeman), J.T. Walsh (John Ehrlichman), Ed Harris (E. Howard Hunt), David Hyde Pierce (John Dean), Edward Herrmann (Nelson Rockefeller) and David Paymer (Ron Ziegler). Critics of the film mostly leveled their complaints at Stone's scenario where dramatic license trumped historical accuracy, but the director, in a 1997 interview, expressed his own surprise at his film's sympathetic leanings towards its subject. "[A]t the end of the day it was really clear that a lot of the problems of Richard Nixon were really personal," he stated. "He distorted himself, in a sense. Instead of taking grace from power and doing something better with his power, he distorted into a darker side. That's what was interesting about the man." Producer: Oliver Stone, Clayton Townsend, Andrew G. Vajna, Dan Halsted, Eric Hamburg, Richard Rutowski Director: Oliver Stone Screenplay: Stephen J. Rivele, Christopher Wilkinson, Oliver Stone Cinematography: Robert Richardson Film Editing: Brian Berdan, Hank Corwin Art Direction: Richard F. Mays, Donald Woodruff, Margery Zweizig Music: John Williams Cast: Anthony Hopkins (Richard Nixon), Joan Allen (Pat Nixon), Powers Boothe (Alexander Haig), Ed Harris (E. Howard Hunt), Bob Hoskins (J. Edgar Hoover), E.G. Marshall (John Mitchell). BW& C-192m. Letterboxed. by Jay S. Steinberg

George Plimpton, 1927-2003


George Plimpton, the wry, self-effacing author whose engaging film appearances enlivened many movies over the years, died of a heart attack on September 25 in his Manhattan apartment. He was 76. George Ames Plimpton was born on March 18, 1927 in New York City. The son of a diplomat, he was well connected to high society. A scholarly man of the letters, hip, urbane bohemians knew him for decades as the unpaid editor to the much respected literary quarterly, The Paris Review, which introduced emerging authors such as Gore Vidal and Jack Kerouac. In 1963, the gaunt, unassuming Plimpton documented his time training with the Detroit Lions, and turned the antics into a shrewd, witty piece of sports fulfillment, Paper Lion. The film was adapted for the big screen by Alex March in 1968 with Alan Alda playing the role of Plimpton. That same year, he made his film debut as a reporter in Gordon Douglas' police thriller The Detective (1968) starring Frank Sinatra and followed that up with an amusing cameo as a gunman shot my John Wayne in Howard Hawks' Rio Lobo (1970). A few more cameos came up over the years, but it wasn't until the '90s that he proved he himself a capable performer and found regular film work: an appropriate role as a talk show moderator in Jodie Foster's Little Man Tate's (1991), the president's lawyer in Oliver Stone's Nixon (1995); a psychologist in Gus Van Zandt's Good Will Hunting (1997); a clubgoer in Whit Stillman's discursive drama The Last Day's of Disco (1998); and a very comical doctor in Jean- Marie Poire's Just VisitingThe Simpsons playing a professor who runs a fixed spelling bee! He is survived by his wife Sara Whitehead Dudley and four children. Michael T. Toole

George Plimpton, 1927-2003

George Plimpton, the wry, self-effacing author whose engaging film appearances enlivened many movies over the years, died of a heart attack on September 25 in his Manhattan apartment. He was 76. George Ames Plimpton was born on March 18, 1927 in New York City. The son of a diplomat, he was well connected to high society. A scholarly man of the letters, hip, urbane bohemians knew him for decades as the unpaid editor to the much respected literary quarterly, The Paris Review, which introduced emerging authors such as Gore Vidal and Jack Kerouac. In 1963, the gaunt, unassuming Plimpton documented his time training with the Detroit Lions, and turned the antics into a shrewd, witty piece of sports fulfillment, Paper Lion. The film was adapted for the big screen by Alex March in 1968 with Alan Alda playing the role of Plimpton. That same year, he made his film debut as a reporter in Gordon Douglas' police thriller The Detective (1968) starring Frank Sinatra and followed that up with an amusing cameo as a gunman shot my John Wayne in Howard Hawks' Rio Lobo (1970). A few more cameos came up over the years, but it wasn't until the '90s that he proved he himself a capable performer and found regular film work: an appropriate role as a talk show moderator in Jodie Foster's Little Man Tate's (1991), the president's lawyer in Oliver Stone's Nixon (1995); a psychologist in Gus Van Zandt's Good Will Hunting (1997); a clubgoer in Whit Stillman's discursive drama The Last Day's of Disco (1998); and a very comical doctor in Jean- Marie Poire's Just Visiting

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Ed Harris was a co-winner, along with Kevin Spacey, of the Broadcast Film Critics Association's 1995 award for Best Supporting Actor. Harris was cited for his performances in "Just Cause" (USA/1995), "Apollo 13" (USA/1995) and "Nixon" (USA/1995).

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Supporting Actress (Joan Allen) from the Boston Society of Film Critics.

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Supporting Actress (Joan Allen) from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Supporting Actress (Joan Allen) from the National Society of Film Critics.

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Supporting Actress (Joan Allen) from the Society of Texas Film Critics.

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Supporting Actress (Joan Allen) from the South Florida Critics' Association.

Winner of the 1995 awards for Best Director and Best Supporting Actress (Joan Allen) from the Chicago Film Critics Association.

Expanded Release in United States December 29, 1995

Expanded Release in United States January 5, 1996

Released in United States February 1996

Released in United States on Video July 9, 1996

Released in United States Winter December 20, 1995

Wide Release in United States December 20, 1995

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (out of competition) February 15-26, 1996.

Began shooting May 1, 1995.

Completed shooting July 21, 1995.

Expanded Release in United States January 5, 1996

Released in United States February 1996 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (out of competition) February 15-26, 1996.)

Released in United States on Video July 9, 1996

Released in United States Winter December 20, 1995

Wide Release in United States December 20, 1995

Expanded Release in United States December 29, 1995