The Madness Of King George


1h 47m 1994

Brief Synopsis

The life of times of King George III, who lapsed in and out of occasional comas due to a metabolic imbalance. The King's son, the Prince of Wales, took advantage of those times, trying to seize power.

Film Details

Also Known As
Den galne kung George, Madness of King George, folie du roi George
MPAA Rating
NR
Genre
Adaptation
Biography
Comedy
Drama
Historical
Period
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
MALOFILMS DISTRIBUTION/SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS; Samuel Goldwyn Films
Location
Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m

Synopsis

The life of times of King George III, who lapsed in and out of occasional comas due to a metabolic imbalance. The King's son, the Prince of Wales, took advantage of those times, trying to seize power.

Crew

Jenny Abey

Other

Christopher Ackland

Sound Editor

Ken Adam

Production Designer

Kate Allen

Costume Department

Tariq Anwar

Editor

Jason Babcock

Other

William Baboo

Costume Department

Alex Bailey

Photography

Roy Baker

Foley Artist

Dominic Barlow

Driver

Helen Barrett

Makeup Artist

Scan Barrett

Other

Bill Barringer

Other

Liz Barron

Other

Miles Barton

Researcher

Keith Batterbee

Other

Nathan Batterbee

Production

Ronald Bede

Production

Jim Beeby

Gaffer

John Behan

Carpenter

Alan Bennett

Play As Source Material

Alan Bennett

Screenplay

Malcolm Bensted

Props

Tom Bhanji

Construction

Boy Biggs

Production

Irene Bohan

Assistant Costume Designer

Leith Boler

Production

Dennis Bosher

Other

Jean Bourne

Script Supervisor

Stephen Brooke Smith

Camera Focus Puller

Anthony Brookman

Wardrobe

Dave Buckingham

Carpenter

Eamonn Cann

Carpenter

Robert Cann

Carpenter

John Casali

Sound Recordist

Claire Chapman

Assistant

Alan Cheevers

Other

Martin Childs

Art Director

Cleone Clarke

Production Assistant

Jane Clarke

Storyboard Artist

John Clarke

Driver

John Clements

Stand-In

Paola Colpani

Accountant

Darren Conway

Other

Trevor Coop

Other

Marc Cooper

Line Producer

Clive Copland

Sound

David Cozens

Other

Stephen Cranny

Driver

Francoise Cresson

Makeup Artist

Naomi Critcher

Wardrobe

David Crozier

Sound Recordist

Mike Cuddy

Driver

Tony D'amato

Carpenter

Bill Dady

Production

Ron Davis

Costume Department

Frances Delmar-morgan

Office Runner

Andrew Dunn

Camera Operator

Andrew Dunn

Director Of Photography

Andrew Dunn

Dp/Cinematographer

Trevor Dyer

Carpenter

Judith Edgley

Wardrobe

Marilla Elliott

Location Assistant

Stephen Evans

Producer

Graham Farrow

Foley

John Fenner

Art Director

George Fenton

Original Music

George Fenton

Music

Stan Fiferman

Foley Editor

Andrew Fox

Advisor

Celestia Fox

Casting Director

Joe Friedman

Location Scout

Mike Frift

Other

Lucy Gaiger

Wardrobe

Paul Garner

Storyboard Artist

Pat Garrett

Grip

Francesca Gentili

Production Assistant

Pat Gilbert

Sound Editor

Jonathan Glendening

Assistant

Lee Goddard

Other

Tony Goddard

Other

Dave Goodey

Other

Keith Grant

Music

Isobel Griffiths

Music Contractor

Peter Gristwood

Props

Robert Gurney

Other

Amanda Hall

Costume Department

Keith Hamshere

Photography

Victoria Harwood

Costumes

Howard Hayner

Wardrobe

Jane Henwood

Art Assistant

Mathew Higgins

Other

Paul Higgins

Assistant Director

Philip Hill

Camera Trainee

Line Hilton

Other

Sid Hinson

Other

Sue Honeyborne

Costume Supervisor

Mike House

Grip

Kevin Huse

Production

Mark Impey

Production

Naomi Isaacs

Costume Department

Ian Jackson

Other

Helen Johnson

Makeup Artist

Bryce Johnstone

Carpenter

David Jones

Production

Richard Jones

Carpenter

Vivien Jordan

Production Coordinator

Debbie Kaye

Other

Sasha Keir

Costume Department

Reginald Keywood

Carpenter

David Kipling

Wardrobe

Nigel Kirton

Steadicam Operator

David Knight

Other

Anna Kot

Wardrobe

Nicholas Kraemer

Music

Sabrina Lamonica

Art Assistant

Bradley Larner

Other

Jane Law

Costume Department

Bernard Leadbitter

Carpenter

Mark H. Lee

Other

Dominic Lester

Rerecording

Peter Lewis

Costume Department

Julie Linname

Accounting Assistant

Joanna Lipper

Driver

Christopher Lloyd

Assistant Editor

Sue Long

Costume Department

Bill Lowe

Other

Lee Lighting Ltd

Lighting

Peter Mackey

Other

Debbie Marchant

Costume Department

Richard Margoschis

Sound

Roy Martin

Other

Richard Maurice

Wardrobe

Sabine Mccrudden

Costume Department

Finn Mcgrath

Assistant Director

Lorraine Mckee

Other

Wayne Michaels

Stunt Coordinator

Stephen Miles

Costumes

Simon Mills

Other

Gareth Milne

Stunt Coordinator

Binky Morrice

Stand-In

Philip Morris

Production

Jimmy Mullins

Grip

Jeremy Murrell

Assistant Director

Rachel Neale

Location Manager

Robin O'donoghue

Rerecording

David Parfitt

Producer

Jim Parker

Props

Nick Penn

Assistant Camera Operator

David Pitt

Carpenter

Steve Pokol

Costumes

Ken Powell

Other

Doug Purdy

Props

Cliff Radley

Camera

Mark Raggett

Art Director

Ronnie Rampton

Best Boy

Simon Reeves

Carpenter

Eric Regan

Other

Sidney Regan

Other

Stuart Renfrew

Assistant Director

Tony Rhone

Other

Bill Richards

Other

Lorraine Richards

Wardrobe

Di Roberts

Makeup Artist

Meinir Roberts

Costume Department

Francesca Robertson

Other

Mel Sansom

Other

Bill Sanson

Other

Simon Saunders

Driver

Carolyn Scott

Set Decorator

Alan Selzer

Costume Department

Richard Shackleton

Carpenter

Jean Sheffield

Foley Artist

Brian Sherrings

Advisor

Jim Shields

Dialogue Editor

John Siddall

Other

Frank Simon

Costumes

Charlie Simpson

Driver

Vic Simpson

Construction Coordinator

Brian Skeels

Makeup

Danny Skundric

Props

Mary Sloan

Assistant Director

Anita St John

Stand-In

John Starkey

Other

Amanda Stevens

Assistant Location Manager

Nigel Stone

Production

Colin Strachan

Grip

Brigid Strowbridge

Costume Department

Terry Tapping

Driver

Brian Taylor

Grip

Deborah Taylor

Makeup Assistant

Jonathan Taylor

Production

Harry Teacher

Assistant

Adrian Thomas

Music

Elaine Thomas

Assistant Sound Editor

Eliza Thompson

Music Supervisor

Mark Thompson

Costume Designer

David Toft

Video

Robert Tofy

Video

Andy Tombs

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Den galne kung George, Madness of King George, folie du roi George
MPAA Rating
NR
Genre
Adaptation
Biography
Comedy
Drama
Historical
Period
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
MALOFILMS DISTRIBUTION/SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS; Samuel Goldwyn Films
Location
Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m

Award Wins

Best Art Direction

1994
Ken Adam

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1994
Nigel Hawthorne

Best Adapted Screenplay

1994

Best Supporting Actress

1994
Helen Mirren

Articles

The Madness of King George -


In 1991, Alan Bennett's fictionalized biographical play of King George III, titled The Madness of George III, premiered at the National Theatre in London. The play was an enormous success, prompting the feature-length film adaptation The Madness of King George (1994). Nicholas Hytner, the director who brought Alan Bennett's play to the stage in the original production, was asked to direct the film adaptation. Hytner accepted, but under the condition that Nigel Hawthorne, a classically-trained stage actor and winner of the 1992 Olivier award for best actor for his performance in The Madness of George III, would be allowed to reprise his role for the screen. Playwright Alan Bennett was also heavily involved in the production, writing the adapted screenplay for the film.

The Madness of King George is a fictionalized account of the latter days of King George III's (Nigel Hawthorne) reign over England. Always considered a rather peculiar and eccentric character, it's soon apparent that those eccentricities are actually fueled by his declining mental state as a result of mental illness, during a time when there was no process for accurate diagnosis, let alone appropriate treatment. King George's erratic behavior sets off a potentially devastating parliamentary crisis and struggle for power by those taking advantage of the political chaos.

Nigel Hawthorne was a prolific stage actor, making his stage debut in the 1950 play The Shop at Sly Corner. Over a career that spanned over fifty years, Hawthorne starred in prominent stage productions of You Can't Take It With You; Curtains; William Shakespeare's As You Like It; Shadowlands; and the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of King Lear in 1999. Hawthorne was also a staple of British television for over four decades, including his role as Sir Humphrey Appleby in the popular sitcom Yes Minister (1980-1984) and its spin-off Yes, Prime Minister (1986-1987). Hawthorne has also provided his voice talents in several animated projects, including the Walt Disney films The Black Cauldron (1985) and Tarzan (1999). For his performance in The Madness of King George, he received rave reviews from both audiences and critics, earning an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor--the only one he received in his career. While this was a momentous occasion in Hawthorne's career, the publicity surrounding his nomination also attracted unwanted attention to his personal life, and the actor was outed as gay, against his wishes to keep his sexuality and relationship private. While upset over the intrusion into his personal life, Hawthorne attended the awards ceremony with his lifelong partner, Trevor Bentham, and openly discussed his sexuality and their relationship until his death in 2001.

The Madness of King George earned a total of four Academy Award nominations, including ones for Hawthorne, Best Supporting Actress for Helen Mirren, Best Adapted Screenplay for Alan Bennett and winning one for Ken Adam and Carolyn Scott's art direction.

The Madness of King George was director Nicholas Hytner's feature-length directorial debut. With the critical and commercial success of the film, Hytner followed-up with another prestigious project, collaborating with American playwright Arthur Miller on the ambitious 1996 adaptation of The Crucible starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder. While Hytner is still primarily a stage director, with many of his productions being for the National Theatre and filmed for international theatrical simulcasts, he has returned behind the camera for a handful of projects, including reuniting with Nigel Hawthorne for The Object of My Affection (1998) and The Lady in the Van (2015), starring Maggie Smith and Jim Broadbent.

Director: Nicholas Hytner
Producer: Stephen Evans and David Parfitt
Screenplay: Alan Bennett
Cinematography: Andrew Dunn
Editing: Tariq Anwar
Art Direction: Ken Adam and Carolyn Scott
Music: George Fenton and George Frideric Handel
Cast: Nigel Hawthorne (King George III), Helen Mirren (Queen Charlotte), Ian Holm (Francis Willis), Amanda Donohoe (Lady Pembroke, Lady of the Bedchamber), Rupert Graves (Colonel Greville), Rupert Everett (George, Prince of Wales), Jim Carter (Charles James Fox), and Julian Wadham (William Pitt the Younger).
C-110m

Resources:

Straight Face by Nigel Hawthorne
https://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2b7dbf144f

By Jill Blake
The Madness Of King George -

The Madness of King George -

In 1991, Alan Bennett's fictionalized biographical play of King George III, titled The Madness of George III, premiered at the National Theatre in London. The play was an enormous success, prompting the feature-length film adaptation The Madness of King George (1994). Nicholas Hytner, the director who brought Alan Bennett's play to the stage in the original production, was asked to direct the film adaptation. Hytner accepted, but under the condition that Nigel Hawthorne, a classically-trained stage actor and winner of the 1992 Olivier award for best actor for his performance in The Madness of George III, would be allowed to reprise his role for the screen. Playwright Alan Bennett was also heavily involved in the production, writing the adapted screenplay for the film. The Madness of King George is a fictionalized account of the latter days of King George III's (Nigel Hawthorne) reign over England. Always considered a rather peculiar and eccentric character, it's soon apparent that those eccentricities are actually fueled by his declining mental state as a result of mental illness, during a time when there was no process for accurate diagnosis, let alone appropriate treatment. King George's erratic behavior sets off a potentially devastating parliamentary crisis and struggle for power by those taking advantage of the political chaos. Nigel Hawthorne was a prolific stage actor, making his stage debut in the 1950 play The Shop at Sly Corner. Over a career that spanned over fifty years, Hawthorne starred in prominent stage productions of You Can't Take It With You; Curtains; William Shakespeare's As You Like It; Shadowlands; and the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of King Lear in 1999. Hawthorne was also a staple of British television for over four decades, including his role as Sir Humphrey Appleby in the popular sitcom Yes Minister (1980-1984) and its spin-off Yes, Prime Minister (1986-1987). Hawthorne has also provided his voice talents in several animated projects, including the Walt Disney films The Black Cauldron (1985) and Tarzan (1999). For his performance in The Madness of King George, he received rave reviews from both audiences and critics, earning an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor--the only one he received in his career. While this was a momentous occasion in Hawthorne's career, the publicity surrounding his nomination also attracted unwanted attention to his personal life, and the actor was outed as gay, against his wishes to keep his sexuality and relationship private. While upset over the intrusion into his personal life, Hawthorne attended the awards ceremony with his lifelong partner, Trevor Bentham, and openly discussed his sexuality and their relationship until his death in 2001. The Madness of King George earned a total of four Academy Award nominations, including ones for Hawthorne, Best Supporting Actress for Helen Mirren, Best Adapted Screenplay for Alan Bennett and winning one for Ken Adam and Carolyn Scott's art direction. The Madness of King George was director Nicholas Hytner's feature-length directorial debut. With the critical and commercial success of the film, Hytner followed-up with another prestigious project, collaborating with American playwright Arthur Miller on the ambitious 1996 adaptation of The Crucible starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder. While Hytner is still primarily a stage director, with many of his productions being for the National Theatre and filmed for international theatrical simulcasts, he has returned behind the camera for a handful of projects, including reuniting with Nigel Hawthorne for The Object of My Affection (1998) and The Lady in the Van (2015), starring Maggie Smith and Jim Broadbent. Director: Nicholas Hytner Producer: Stephen Evans and David Parfitt Screenplay: Alan Bennett Cinematography: Andrew Dunn Editing: Tariq Anwar Art Direction: Ken Adam and Carolyn Scott Music: George Fenton and George Frideric Handel Cast: Nigel Hawthorne (King George III), Helen Mirren (Queen Charlotte), Ian Holm (Francis Willis), Amanda Donohoe (Lady Pembroke, Lady of the Bedchamber), Rupert Graves (Colonel Greville), Rupert Everett (George, Prince of Wales), Jim Carter (Charles James Fox), and Julian Wadham (William Pitt the Younger). C-110m Resources: Straight Face by Nigel Hawthorne https://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2b7dbf144f By Jill Blake

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 28, 1994

Expanded Release in United States January 13, 1995

Expanded Release in United States January 20, 1995

Expanded Release in United States January 27, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 3, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 10, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 17, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 24, 1995

Expanded Release in United States March 3, 1995

Expanded Release in United States March 10, 1995

Expanded Release in United States March 17, 1995

Released in United States on Video September 19, 1995

Released in United States on Video September 19, 1996

Released in United States 1995

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Los Angeles February 23 - March 3, 1995.

Feature film directorial debut for stage director Nicholas Hytner. "The Madness of George III" was originally performed by the Royal National Theatre.

Completed shooting September 7, 1994.

Began shooting July 11, 1994.

Released in United States Winter December 28, 1994

Expanded Release in United States January 13, 1995

Expanded Release in United States January 20, 1995

Expanded Release in United States January 27, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 3, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 10, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 17, 1995

Expanded Release in United States February 24, 1995

Expanded Release in United States March 3, 1995

Expanded Release in United States March 10, 1995

Released in United States on Video September 19, 1995

Released in United States on Video September 19, 1996

Released in United States 1995 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Los Angeles February 23 - March 3, 1995.)

Expanded Release in United States March 17, 1995

Alan Bennett was nominated for the 1994 award for Best Adapted Screenplay by the Writers Guild of America (WGA).