King of the Hill


1h 42m 1993

Brief Synopsis

The Great Depression years in midwest America as seen through the eyes of a 12-year-old Jewish boy.

Film Details

Also Known As
King of the Hill - Hjälten från Saint Louis
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Drama
Period
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Jane Alderman Casting; Populist Pictures; Universal Pictures; Wildwood Enterprises; Yerxa-Berger Productions
Distribution Company
CINEPLEX ODEON FILMS/GRAMERCY PICTURES; Cineplex Odeon Films; Cineplex Odeon Films; Gramercy Pictures; Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Location
St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

The Great Depression years in midwest America as seen through the eyes of a 12-year-old Jewish boy.

Crew

Mark Aeling

Other

Cheyenne Ali

Other

Matthew Altman

On-Set Dresser

Chris M Alvarez

Other

Andy Amann

Set Dresser

Paulette Amaro

Assistant Extras Casting

John Angelo

Driver

Deborah Aquila

Casting Director

Mark Asher

Construction Supervisor

Stephanie Axe

Unit Production Assistant

Carmen Bailey

Camera Loader

Chris Barnes

Other

Philip Barnes

Other

Paul Barrett

Other

Paul Barrett

Other

Trey Batchelor

Key Set Production Assistant

Mike Bender

Set Dresser

Albert Berger

Producer

Larry Blake

Post-Production/Sound

Ron Bolte

Carpenter

Heidi Borgel

Other

Claire Bowin

Set Decorator

Robin Brown

1st Camera Assistant

Cynthia Gail Brummer

Props Production Assistant

Jim Burcke

Craft Service

Matt Cahill

Construction Production Assistant

Rebecca Carriaga

Assistant Props

Russ Christian

Driver

Billy Collins

Assistant (To Producer)

Laura Connolly

Hair Supervisor

Rick Cowan

Unit Manager

Andrew Cross

Other

Curtis L Crowell

Construction Production Assistant

Lynn D'angona

3rd Assistant Director

Dan Dahmer

Carpenter

John Dardis

Other

Elliot Davis

Dp/Cinematographer

Elliot Davis

Director Of Photography

Leroy Davis

Driver

Lisa Dennison

Art Department Coordinator

Mark Donoghue

Other

Mike Dougan

Company Grip

Robert Doyle

Other

Karen Eisenstadt

Production Auditor

David Elliott

Construction Coordinator

Tutt Esquerre

Other

Joseph James Farrell

Carpenter

Pat Farrell

Carpenter

Gary Frutkoff

Production Designer

Dave Fuegner

Carpenter

Shelly Gabert

Other

Dmitri Gelfand

Other

Aaron Glascock

Assistant Editor

Laura Goldsmith

Wardrobe Supervisor

Judy Gorey

Sound Production Assistant

Walter Gorey

Boom Operator

Carolyn Greco

Assistant Costume Designer

Carolyn Gregory

Wardrobe Intern

Josh Hancock

Transportation Coordinator

Paul Hanon

Wardrobe Intern

John Hardy

Executive Producer

John V Harrison

Camera Intern

Brigid Hart

Wardrobe Intern

Amy Hartweger

Other

Joe Hawkins

Honeywagon Driver

Christy Hebble

Key Set Production Assistant

Joseph Michael Henry

Carpenter

Dan Hodapp

Carpenter

Liza Holman

Office Intern

Rebecca Hosley

Wardrobe Intern

A. E. Hotchner

Source Material (Memoir)

A. E. Hotchner

Source Material (From Novel)

Carrie Houk

Location/Extras Casting

Erman Jackson

Driver

Gregory Jacobs

1st Assistant Director

David E Jensen

Company Grip

Georgia Kacandes

Unit Production Manager

Yael Kats

Other

Red Kelly

Other

Jeffrey Kimball

Music Supervisor

Daniel Kinkade

Office Assistant

Katrina Kirby

Office Intern

Peter Knese

Wardrobe Intern

Kyle Konz

Catering

Julie Kuehndorf

Publicity (Clein + White)

Allen Kupetsky

2nd Assistant Director

M Travis Lackey

Catering

Elizabeth Karsh Lambert

Script Supervisor

Paul Ledford

Production Sound Mixer

David C. Lee

Stills Photographer

Janice Kathy Lewis

Carpenter

Carolyn Lindsey

Wardrobe Intern

Michael Loui

Other

Linda Louis-vanreed

Assistant Production Coordinator

Eric Luebbert

Additional On-Set Wardrobe

Sue Luepker

Assistant Car Coordinator

Susan Lyall

Costume Designer

Calvin Maehl

Chief Lighting Technician

Richard Mall

Key Grip

Barbara Maltby

Producer

Fred Mandel

Set Production Assistant

Paul Marcus

Supervisor

Jay Margolin

Travel Coordinator/Office Assistant

Cliff Martinez

Music

John H Mccabe

Construction Supervisor

Jeff Mccarter

Other

David Mccarthy

Carpenter

James Mccarthy

Carpenter

Richard Mccarthy

Carpenter

Tim Mcdonald

Set Dresser

Heather Mcgrath

Production Coordinator

David Mcklveen

Construction Foreman

Marty Mcmanus

Set Dresser

Robin Melhuish

2nd Camera Assistant

Andrew Millner

Other

Matt Moles

Best Boy Grip

Rick Morelli

Set Production Assistant

Jeaneen Muckerman

Additional Hair

Monica Muehlhause-horn

Assistant Auditor

Craig Muzio

Other

John Nuler

2nd Camera Operator

Pamelah Oakey

Assistant Location Manager

Elaine Offers

Makeup Supervisor

Erik Olson

Set Designer

Noon Orsatti

Stunt Coordinator

Kenn Ort

Other

Paul Paguyo

Company Grip

Ann Pala

Additional Makeup

Timothy John Pendergast

Carpenter

Steve Piemont

Other

Jodel Pupillo

Set Production Assistant

Bill Rea

Art Director

Robert Redford

Executive Producer

Leah Reyes-ramos

Office Intern

Mia Ries

Set Production Assistant

Felix A. Rivera

Best Boy Electric

Megan Rodgers

Wardrobe Intern

Alex Root

Dailies Coordinator

Raymond R Ruby

Carpenter

Nick Sanders

Transportation Captain

Michael Sanlin

Kiel Security

Darryl Schneiderman

Other

Mark Shea

Carpenter

D J Smith

Other

Rusty Smith

Catering

John W. Snow

Other

Steven Soderbergh

Screenwriter

Steven Soderbergh

Editor

Bob Stone

Company Grip

David Allen Stone

Carpenter

Gregory L Stone

Carpenter

Frank Stubblefield

Other

Mark Thie

Other

Richard Tollkuhn

Other

Laurie Trevethan

Additional On-Set Wardrobe

Ernest Trevino

Other

Cricket Vandover

Additional On-Set Wardrobe

Bruce Vanreed

Set Production Assistant

Todd Watschke

Construction Supervisor

Jeff Whiteside

Medic

Carol Wilson

Assistant Set Decorator

Mark Wilson

Construction Supervisor

Lizz Wolf

Set Costumer

Thomas Woodward

Carpenter

Ron Yerxa

Producer

William Zullo

Props Master

Film Details

Also Known As
King of the Hill - Hjälten från Saint Louis
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Drama
Period
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Jane Alderman Casting; Populist Pictures; Universal Pictures; Wildwood Enterprises; Yerxa-Berger Productions
Distribution Company
CINEPLEX ODEON FILMS/GRAMERCY PICTURES; Cineplex Odeon Films; Cineplex Odeon Films; Gramercy Pictures; Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Location
St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Articles

King of the Hill on Criterion Blu-ray


King of the Hill (1993) is the third feature from Steven Soderbergh, who jumped to the head of the American independent scene when sex, lies and videotape took the Audience Award at Sundance 1989 and went on to win the Palme d'Or at Cannes before getting a wide release in suburban multiplexes. His second film, Kafka (1991), wasn't a success but it revealed a serious filmmaker who wanted to explore different subjects and genres. King of the Hill continued that tradition in that is was yet again a complete change of style and subject matter for the director: an adaptation of the memoir by A.E. Hotchner about life as an adolescent during the Depression. It was also his first studio production, made for the fledgling Gramercy Pictures, and it gave him the biggest budget of his career. He was able to craft a rich recreation of early thirties St. Louis as seen through the eyes of a hopeful boy in an increasingly desperate situation.

Jesse Bradford is Aaron, a smart, creative, generous high school kid who spins stories to hide the fact that his family is broke and living out of a hotel, where they are behind in the rent. To stay in his high school, a well-maintained school filled with affluent kids (Aaron is "a charity case," as one of his affluent classmates describes him), he and his kid brother Sullivan (Cameron Boyd) have to keep up the fiction that they reside in a nearby apartment house. His dad (Jeroen Krabbé) is a salesman hawking "wickless candles" that no one is buying while he waits for one of his many applications to pay off with a better job. Aaron picks up odd jobs as he can with the help of Lester (Adrian Brody in his first major role), an older kid who looks over Aaron like a big brother. Lester knows the angles and hustles his way to survival and his mentorship gives Aaron the skills and strength to survive when he's force to take care of himself.

By the time of King of the Hill, or at least looking back in hindsight, you can pick out a theme emerging from Soderbergh's film, specifically an interest in characters isolated from the world around them. Aaron is in fact an engaged and engaging boy, liked by his teacher (Karen Allen) and by the girls his age (including young Katherine Heigl) alike, but he keeps a distance from his schoolmates simply because he's of a different world and constantly spinning stories to cover the truth. His connections are back in his neighborhood, a busy, lively place slipping into poverty and desperation, and that's where his world falls apart. His mom (Lisa Eichhorn) is in failing health and is soon checked into a sanitarium to recover. Sullivan is sent to live with relatives (one less mouth to feed while money is practically non-existent) and dad all but abandons him to take a job as a traveling salesman in a territory that takes him out of state. Dad isn't heartless, he's simply desperate, but the upshot is Aaron left broke and alone in a hotel with no safety net (despite his dad's best efforts otherwise) and a mercenary bellhop who takes personal pleasure in locking out debtor guests and locking up their belongings in storage, his own personal treasure room in the basement.

King of the Hill rests on the shoulders of Jesse Bradford, who gives Aaron the strength, generosity, and intelligence to survive the increasingly dire situation. He keeps his eyes open and sees how the world works and Soderbergh keeps us to his perspective. When things are at their worst, with Aaron isolated and alone, a lone hold-out in siege against his fort, and getting delirious from lack of food, we share his hazy outlook. It's the scariest scene in a film that, despite the subject matter, offers a generally hopeful atmosphere and a young hero as self-possessed and resilient as Aaron. Soderbergh doesn't flinch from the hard realities he faces but presents it with a poetic quality, suggesting the worst rather than showing it, in an urban world painted in sepia colors and brightened by the summer sun (a little too sunny, perhaps, given the hard times it presents). With its mix of guardian angels, mercenary authority figures, eccentric neighbors, and colorful urban atmosphere, it's like a modern version of a thirties street drama painted in the colors of an Edward Hopper canvas.

King of the Hill works because largely because of Bradford's strength and Soderbergh's detail. Most of the film plays out in the hotel or on the streets just outside, where a fat, pig-eyed bully of a cop terrorizes the kids and rousts the hobos in the Hooverville camped out across the square. The gentle but not entirely reliable Mr. Mungo (Spalding Gray) across the hall is a Wall Street victim drinking away the last of his wealth with the help of a hardcase of a hooker (Elizabeth McGovern) running up the room service tab. There are plenty of little character sketches and adventures strewn through the film but Aaron's odyssey, a different kind of coming-of-age story, is the backbone and Soderbergh seems to reward his resilience (and our emotional investment in him) with a small triumph that nonetheless feels like a great victory. Mostly because Aaron and Sullivan do it themselves, with no help from any of the adults. It's Aaron's real graduation.

Criterion releases the film as a three-disc Blu-ray+DVD Combo and a two-disc DVD-only release, mastered from a 2K digital transfer from a Super 35mm interpositive approved by Soderbergh. The image is vibrant and sharp, with the colors both vivid and aged, a palette of browns and yellows and muted primary colors to suggest both yesteryear hues and the warm glow of memory.

Both editions feature the same wealth of supplements and accompanying booklet. There is a new 20-minute interview with director Steven Soderbergh, who has an affection for the film and had a very good relationship with Gramercy Picture during the production, but is more critical than one might expect. He praises his cast and production staff but is pretty hard on himself for many of his directorial choices. There is also a 22-minute interview with author A.E. Hotchner and the video essay "Against Tyranny" by filmmaker :: kogonada that explores the film's hallucination sequence.

The most unexpected supplement is Soderbergh's fourth feature The Underneath (1995), a remake of Criss Cross starring Peter Gallagher, Alison Elliott and William Fichtner. Which is, yes, yet another genre leap, this one a sleek, shadowy modern thriller with tone of nostalgia for old-Hollywood style. This one never really comes together but you can see him working out ideas that emerge fully formed in his later films Out of Sight and The Limey, and it effectively makes this release a double-feature. The booklet features an essay by critic Peter Tonguette, a 1993 interview with Soderbergh, and an excerpt from Hotchner's 1972 memoir.

by Sean Axmaker
King Of The Hill On Criterion Blu-Ray

King of the Hill on Criterion Blu-ray

King of the Hill (1993) is the third feature from Steven Soderbergh, who jumped to the head of the American independent scene when sex, lies and videotape took the Audience Award at Sundance 1989 and went on to win the Palme d'Or at Cannes before getting a wide release in suburban multiplexes. His second film, Kafka (1991), wasn't a success but it revealed a serious filmmaker who wanted to explore different subjects and genres. King of the Hill continued that tradition in that is was yet again a complete change of style and subject matter for the director: an adaptation of the memoir by A.E. Hotchner about life as an adolescent during the Depression. It was also his first studio production, made for the fledgling Gramercy Pictures, and it gave him the biggest budget of his career. He was able to craft a rich recreation of early thirties St. Louis as seen through the eyes of a hopeful boy in an increasingly desperate situation. Jesse Bradford is Aaron, a smart, creative, generous high school kid who spins stories to hide the fact that his family is broke and living out of a hotel, where they are behind in the rent. To stay in his high school, a well-maintained school filled with affluent kids (Aaron is "a charity case," as one of his affluent classmates describes him), he and his kid brother Sullivan (Cameron Boyd) have to keep up the fiction that they reside in a nearby apartment house. His dad (Jeroen Krabbé) is a salesman hawking "wickless candles" that no one is buying while he waits for one of his many applications to pay off with a better job. Aaron picks up odd jobs as he can with the help of Lester (Adrian Brody in his first major role), an older kid who looks over Aaron like a big brother. Lester knows the angles and hustles his way to survival and his mentorship gives Aaron the skills and strength to survive when he's force to take care of himself. By the time of King of the Hill, or at least looking back in hindsight, you can pick out a theme emerging from Soderbergh's film, specifically an interest in characters isolated from the world around them. Aaron is in fact an engaged and engaging boy, liked by his teacher (Karen Allen) and by the girls his age (including young Katherine Heigl) alike, but he keeps a distance from his schoolmates simply because he's of a different world and constantly spinning stories to cover the truth. His connections are back in his neighborhood, a busy, lively place slipping into poverty and desperation, and that's where his world falls apart. His mom (Lisa Eichhorn) is in failing health and is soon checked into a sanitarium to recover. Sullivan is sent to live with relatives (one less mouth to feed while money is practically non-existent) and dad all but abandons him to take a job as a traveling salesman in a territory that takes him out of state. Dad isn't heartless, he's simply desperate, but the upshot is Aaron left broke and alone in a hotel with no safety net (despite his dad's best efforts otherwise) and a mercenary bellhop who takes personal pleasure in locking out debtor guests and locking up their belongings in storage, his own personal treasure room in the basement. King of the Hill rests on the shoulders of Jesse Bradford, who gives Aaron the strength, generosity, and intelligence to survive the increasingly dire situation. He keeps his eyes open and sees how the world works and Soderbergh keeps us to his perspective. When things are at their worst, with Aaron isolated and alone, a lone hold-out in siege against his fort, and getting delirious from lack of food, we share his hazy outlook. It's the scariest scene in a film that, despite the subject matter, offers a generally hopeful atmosphere and a young hero as self-possessed and resilient as Aaron. Soderbergh doesn't flinch from the hard realities he faces but presents it with a poetic quality, suggesting the worst rather than showing it, in an urban world painted in sepia colors and brightened by the summer sun (a little too sunny, perhaps, given the hard times it presents). With its mix of guardian angels, mercenary authority figures, eccentric neighbors, and colorful urban atmosphere, it's like a modern version of a thirties street drama painted in the colors of an Edward Hopper canvas. King of the Hill works because largely because of Bradford's strength and Soderbergh's detail. Most of the film plays out in the hotel or on the streets just outside, where a fat, pig-eyed bully of a cop terrorizes the kids and rousts the hobos in the Hooverville camped out across the square. The gentle but not entirely reliable Mr. Mungo (Spalding Gray) across the hall is a Wall Street victim drinking away the last of his wealth with the help of a hardcase of a hooker (Elizabeth McGovern) running up the room service tab. There are plenty of little character sketches and adventures strewn through the film but Aaron's odyssey, a different kind of coming-of-age story, is the backbone and Soderbergh seems to reward his resilience (and our emotional investment in him) with a small triumph that nonetheless feels like a great victory. Mostly because Aaron and Sullivan do it themselves, with no help from any of the adults. It's Aaron's real graduation. Criterion releases the film as a three-disc Blu-ray+DVD Combo and a two-disc DVD-only release, mastered from a 2K digital transfer from a Super 35mm interpositive approved by Soderbergh. The image is vibrant and sharp, with the colors both vivid and aged, a palette of browns and yellows and muted primary colors to suggest both yesteryear hues and the warm glow of memory. Both editions feature the same wealth of supplements and accompanying booklet. There is a new 20-minute interview with director Steven Soderbergh, who has an affection for the film and had a very good relationship with Gramercy Picture during the production, but is more critical than one might expect. He praises his cast and production staff but is pretty hard on himself for many of his directorial choices. There is also a 22-minute interview with author A.E. Hotchner and the video essay "Against Tyranny" by filmmaker :: kogonada that explores the film's hallucination sequence. The most unexpected supplement is Soderbergh's fourth feature The Underneath (1995), a remake of Criss Cross starring Peter Gallagher, Alison Elliott and William Fichtner. Which is, yes, yet another genre leap, this one a sleek, shadowy modern thriller with tone of nostalgia for old-Hollywood style. This one never really comes together but you can see him working out ideas that emerge fully formed in his later films Out of Sight and The Limey, and it effectively makes this release a double-feature. The booklet features an essay by critic Peter Tonguette, a 1993 interview with Soderbergh, and an excerpt from Hotchner's 1972 memoir. by Sean Axmaker

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 20, 1993

Expanded Release in United States September 10, 1993

Expanded Release in United States September 24, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 1, 1993

Released in United States on Video March 9, 1994

Released in United States 1993 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 14 - June 6, 1993.)

Released in United States Summer August 20, 1993

Expanded Release in United States September 10, 1993

Expanded Release in United States September 24, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 1, 1993

Released in United States on Video March 9, 1994

Released in United States 1993

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 14 - June 6, 1993.

Began shooting July 27, 1992.

Completed shooting September 19, 1992.

Wildwood Productions is Robert Redford's production company.