The King¿s Speech


1h 58m 2010
The King¿s Speech

Brief Synopsis

When he's forced to take the throne, George VI approaches an unconventional therapist to cure his stammer.

Film Details

Also Known As
Discursul regelui, Kraljev govor, Kuninkaan puhe, O Discurso do Rei
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Biography
Historical
Period
Release Date
2010
Production Company
Paul Cable
Distribution Company
ALLIANCE ATLANTIS VIVAFILM/THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY
Location
Battersea Power Station, Battersea, London, England, UK

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Synopsis

After the death of his father King George V and the scandalous abdication of King Edward VIII, Bertie who has suffered from a debilitating speech impediment all his life, is suddenly crowned King George VI of England. With his country on the brink of war and in desperate need of a leader, his wife, Elizabeth, the future Queen Mother, arranges for her husband to see an eccentric speech therapist, Lionel Logue. After a rough start, the two delve into an unorthodox course of treatment and eventually form an unbreakable bond. With the support of Logue, his family, his government and Winston Churchill, the King will overcome his stammer and deliver a radio-address that inspires his people and unites them in battle.

Crew

Saarika Ali

2-D Artist

Terence Alvares

2-D Artist

Mike Andrews

Film Lab

Tariq Anwar

Film Editor

David Arch

Soloist

Thomas Asquith

Assistant Location Manager

Philip Attfield

Visual Effects Supervisor

John Ayres

Driver

John Barrett

Music

Alison Beard

Assistant Costume Designer

Jenny Beavan

Costume Designer

Jean-pascal Beintus

Music

David Bell

Unit Manager

Mark Bellett

Driver

Erica Bensly

Production Manager

Bruce Bigg

Property Master

Debashish Bora

2-D Artist

Roy Borrett

Stand-In

Thomas Bowes

Music

Siobhan Boyes

Post-Production Coordinator

Paul Brett

Executive Producer

Tom Brewster

Assistant Director

David Broder

Location Manager

Len Brown

Consultant

Alastair Bruce

Advisor

Debbie Bryant

Driver

Francesca Budd

Assistant

Peter Burgis

Foley Artist

Corina Burrough

Props Buyer

Peter Byrne

Camera Focus Puller

Paul Cable

Production Insurance

Iain Canning

Producer

Joe Carey

Sound

Julia Castle

Art Department Coordinator

Abigail Catto

Clapper Loader

Kevin Chamberlin

Caterer

Netty Chapman

Art Director

Alan Chesters

Construction Manager

Leigh Chesters

Carpenter

Isabel Chick

Production Accountant

Ritu Chourasia

2-D Artist

David Churchyard

Clapper Loader

Peter Clark

Accounting Assistant

Peter Clarke

Music Editor

Philip Clements

Assistant Sound Editor

Peter Cobbin

Music

Shaun Cobley

Camera Focus Puller

Kharmel Cochrane

Casting Assistant

Danny Cohen

Director Of Photography

Danny Cohen

Camera Operator

Danny Cohen

Dp/Cinematographer

Guy Cope

Rigging Electrician

David Cozens

Camera Focus Puller

Martyn Culpan

Video Playback

Neil Cunningham

Visual Effects Supervisor

John Dalton

Medic

Terry Davies

Music Conductor

Rebecca Davis

Assistant Location Manager

Sean Davis

Electrician

Fawnda Denham

Visual Effects Producer

Andie Derrick

Foley Artist

Alexandre Desplat

Music

Alexandre Desplat

Music Composer

Charles Dorfman

Associate Producer

Cathy Doubleday

Script Supervisor

Tim Drewett

Film Lab

Pratik Dubey

2-D Artist

Andrew Dudman

Music Scoring Mixer

Elliot Dupuy

Camera Trainee

Peter Eardley

Post-Production Accountant

Simon Egan

Coproducer

Will Emsworth

Production Assistant

Judy Farr

Set Decorator

Edwin Field

Advisor

Nana Fischer

Hair & Makeup

Michael Fleming

Propman

Joss Flores

2-D Artist

Simon Fogg

Grip

Mark Foligno

Executive Producer

Xavier Forcioli

Music Coordinator

Andrew Forrest

Propman

Alan Fraser

Electrician

Henry Gallagher

Painter

Fiona Garland

Production Coordinator

Clarice Gill

Hair & Makeup

Max Glickman

Clapper Loader

Jim Goddard

Sound Effects Editor

Leigh Gold

Camera Focus Puller

Nina Gold

Casting Director

Marilyn Goldsworthy

Production Accountant

Paul Gooch

Hair & Makeup

Heidi Gower

Assistant Director

Katherine Greenacre

Costume Department

Charlotte Grey

Sound

Danny Griffiths

Electrician

Isobel Griffiths

Music

Sanket Gune

2-D Artist

Ruth Halliday

Researcher

Paul Hamblin

Sound Mixer

Paul Hamblin

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

John Hanks

Rigging Electrician

Frances Hannon

Hair & Makeup

John Hardwick

2-D Artist

Martin Harrison

Assistant Director

Peter Hasler

Propman

Jo Hawthorne

Carpenter

Dave Hayball

Chef

Guy Heeley

Assistant Director

Julie Heskin

Assistant Director

Peter Heslop

Line Producer

Peter Heslop

Coproducer

David Hindle

Art Director

Catherine Hodgson

Sound Effects Editor

Duncan Holland

Visual Effects Coordinator

Mark Holt

Special Effects Supervisor

Phil Hope

Co-Executive Producer

Tom Horton

Visual Effects Producer

Jonathan Houston

Assistant Production Coordinator

Gary Hutchings

Grip

Marc Hutchings

2-D Artist

Tom Hyde

Electrician

Douglas Ingram

Storyboard Artist

Lee Isgar

Driver

Carmel Jackson

Hair & Makeup

Matt James

Film Lab

Danny Jarman

Driver

Martin Jensen

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Martin Jensen

Sound Mixer

Carrie Johnson

Medic

Julian Johnson

Cgi Artist

Lisa Jones

Accountant

Simon Jones

Transportation Captain

Pratik Kalbende

2-D Artist

Francois Kamffer

Film Lab

David 'ned' Kelly

Carpenter

Lizzie Kelly

Video Playback

Will Kendall

Best Boy

Martin Kenzie

Dp/Cinematographer

Martin Kenzie

Director Of Photography

Simon Kilroe

2-D Artist

Iryna Kiszko

Music

Soren Kloch

Consultant

Jody Knight

Grip

Steve Knight

Film Lab

Carmine Lauri

Music

Matthew Lawson

Accounting Assistant

Jamie Lengyel

Location Manager

Liam Lock

Assistant Director

Mark Logue

Consultant

Oliver Loncraine

Camera Focus Puller

Scarlett Mackmin

Choreographer

Richard Manlove

Stand-In

Nathan Mann

Camera Focus Puller

Andrew Mannion

Assistant Director

Stefano Margaritelli

Office Runner

Andrew Marriner

Soloist

Nik Martin

2-D Artist

Dash Mason-malik

Sound

Barry May-leybourne

Medic

Gerard Mccann

Music Editor

Leon Mccarthy

Art Director

Will Mccord

Caterer

Guy Mccormack

Video Playback

Paul Mcgeachan

Gaffer

Jenna Mcgranaghan

Costume Department

Rick Mcmahon

2-D Artist

Alasdair Mcneill

2-D Artist

Connan Mcstay

On-Line Editor

David Mears

Painter

Arun Mendon

2-D Artist

Amy Merry

Graphic Designer

John Midgley

Sound Mixer

Steven Morphew

Stand-In

Dean Morris

Grip

Will Morris

Camera Trainee

Alex Mott

Grip

Sanjiv Naik

2-D Artist

Zac Nicholson

Steadicam Operator

Mitch Niclas

Propman

Abhiman Nimaan

2-D Artist

Forbes Noonan

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Collette Nunes

Visual Effects Editor

Moses Nyache

Auditor

David O'donoghue

Driver

Patrick O'sullivan

Special Effects Technician

Sam Okell

Music

Camise Oldfield

Art Department Assistant

Eva Onsrud

Art Department

Steve Osborne

Soloist

David Otzen

Costume Department

Zissis Papatzkis

2-D Artist

Sarah Parfitt

Coordinator

Christine Perrett

Caterer

William Pidgley

Driver

Steve Pirolli

Driver

Lindsey Powell

Location Assistant

Darren Price

Floor Runner

Alan Pritt

Production Manager

Anil Rawat

2-D Artist

Mike Reardon

Sound

Film Details

Also Known As
Discursul regelui, Kraljev govor, Kuninkaan puhe, O Discurso do Rei
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Biography
Historical
Period
Release Date
2010
Production Company
Paul Cable
Distribution Company
ALLIANCE ATLANTIS VIVAFILM/THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY
Location
Battersea Power Station, Battersea, London, England, UK

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Award Wins

Best Actor

2011
Colin Firth

Best Director

2011
Tom Hooper

Best Original Screenplay

2011
David Seidler

Best Picture

2011

Articles

The King's Speech


David Seidler, the writer responsible for bringing the story of King George VI's battle with stammering to the stage and screen, achieves success on two levels. He creates an entertaining and enthralling history lesson and at the same time creates intimate, personal relationships between the moviegoer and the characters, even though the characters, the lead character especially, are unimaginably wealthy and powerful. This is, as they say, a neat trick. It cannot be easy to generate sympathy for a man who never worked a day in his life and yet had every advantage given to him but somehow, Seidler does. This isn't just a testament to Seidler's writing, although, of course, it is, but also a testament to the greatness of Colin Firth's performance, an actor capable of making us believe, or better yet, understand, that the King, though a king he may be, was still just a man, as scared and helpless as the rest of us.

Seidler himself suffered from stammering and found comfort in the story of a king who overcame the same affliction. But how could the story of a man as prominent as King George VI suffering from stammering not be known? Two reasons. The first was that, quite simply, the royal family didn't want to advertise the story any more than needed. Since the King had overcome the problem, they felt no need to discuss it and the Queen Mother even asked Seidler to refrain from publishing his writings on the subject until after she had died, which he did. But the second reason, the one really responsible for so little being publically known about King George VI and his affliction, was that George VI's brother was the very same Edward who abdicated the throne and married American divorcee Wallis Simpson. When something like that happens in the royal family, every other story takes a backseat for the next several decades.

The film opens with Prince Albert, Duke of York (Bertie to his family and the future King George VI to the rest of us), struggling through a speech at Wembley Stadium in 1925. It's painful to watch as he cannot get even a word to come out effortlessly. His wife Elizabeth sends him to a speech therapist, Lionel Logue, and the Prince is immediately offended as Logue insists on calling him Bertie. The meeting ends poorly as Bertie storms out but later, he has a change of heart when he listens to a recording that Logue made. The recording in question was one that Logue made of Bertie speaking while listening to music on headphones. It's only then, listening to the record, that Bertie realizes he was speaking perfectly when the music was playing and decides to give Logue a second chance.

The story also deals with the abdication of the throne by Edward and, of course, Britain's entry into the war against Germany, prompting that famous speech that the title refers to, at least in part. But, mainly, it deals with George VI's problem and does that by removing King George VI from history and transforming him into an everyman, faced with a personal hardship he must overcome. It also continued a fascination with the British nobility and royalty that began years before but really began to grow in the 21st century. Julian Fellowes work, from Gosford Park to Downton Abbey, and award winning movies like The Queen (2006), and The King's Speech, furthered a trend of bringing the nobility and royalty of Britain down to earth where viewers can finally recognize them on a human level.

The King's Speech took home a slew of Oscars and became a box office hit. Tom Hooper, whose most notable previous effort, the great miniseries John Adams, had dealt with American royalty in the form of the founding fathers, won Best Director and Colin Firth, excellent in so many films before and since, finally took home his first Oscar for Best Actor. Oscar winner Geoffrey Rush supplied great support as the linguistic coach that finally got the King's speech under control. But the real force behind the film is David Seidler, the writer who identified with a king and performed the deft sleight of hand that made the king identifiable as an ordinary man to all of us.

By Greg Ferrara
The King's Speech

The King's Speech

David Seidler, the writer responsible for bringing the story of King George VI's battle with stammering to the stage and screen, achieves success on two levels. He creates an entertaining and enthralling history lesson and at the same time creates intimate, personal relationships between the moviegoer and the characters, even though the characters, the lead character especially, are unimaginably wealthy and powerful. This is, as they say, a neat trick. It cannot be easy to generate sympathy for a man who never worked a day in his life and yet had every advantage given to him but somehow, Seidler does. This isn't just a testament to Seidler's writing, although, of course, it is, but also a testament to the greatness of Colin Firth's performance, an actor capable of making us believe, or better yet, understand, that the King, though a king he may be, was still just a man, as scared and helpless as the rest of us. Seidler himself suffered from stammering and found comfort in the story of a king who overcame the same affliction. But how could the story of a man as prominent as King George VI suffering from stammering not be known? Two reasons. The first was that, quite simply, the royal family didn't want to advertise the story any more than needed. Since the King had overcome the problem, they felt no need to discuss it and the Queen Mother even asked Seidler to refrain from publishing his writings on the subject until after she had died, which he did. But the second reason, the one really responsible for so little being publically known about King George VI and his affliction, was that George VI's brother was the very same Edward who abdicated the throne and married American divorcee Wallis Simpson. When something like that happens in the royal family, every other story takes a backseat for the next several decades. The film opens with Prince Albert, Duke of York (Bertie to his family and the future King George VI to the rest of us), struggling through a speech at Wembley Stadium in 1925. It's painful to watch as he cannot get even a word to come out effortlessly. His wife Elizabeth sends him to a speech therapist, Lionel Logue, and the Prince is immediately offended as Logue insists on calling him Bertie. The meeting ends poorly as Bertie storms out but later, he has a change of heart when he listens to a recording that Logue made. The recording in question was one that Logue made of Bertie speaking while listening to music on headphones. It's only then, listening to the record, that Bertie realizes he was speaking perfectly when the music was playing and decides to give Logue a second chance. The story also deals with the abdication of the throne by Edward and, of course, Britain's entry into the war against Germany, prompting that famous speech that the title refers to, at least in part. But, mainly, it deals with George VI's problem and does that by removing King George VI from history and transforming him into an everyman, faced with a personal hardship he must overcome. It also continued a fascination with the British nobility and royalty that began years before but really began to grow in the 21st century. Julian Fellowes work, from Gosford Park to Downton Abbey, and award winning movies like The Queen (2006), and The King's Speech, furthered a trend of bringing the nobility and royalty of Britain down to earth where viewers can finally recognize them on a human level. The King's Speech took home a slew of Oscars and became a box office hit. Tom Hooper, whose most notable previous effort, the great miniseries John Adams, had dealt with American royalty in the form of the founding fathers, won Best Director and Colin Firth, excellent in so many films before and since, finally took home his first Oscar for Best Actor. Oscar winner Geoffrey Rush supplied great support as the linguistic coach that finally got the King's speech under control. But the real force behind the film is David Seidler, the writer who identified with a king and performed the deft sleight of hand that made the king identifiable as an ordinary man to all of us. By Greg Ferrara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video April 19, 2011

Released in United States Fall November 26, 2010 (Los Angeles and New York City.)

Released in United States on Video April 19, 2011

Released in United States 2010 (Galas)

Released in United States 2010

Project was included on the 2009 Black List.

Released in United States 2010 (Shown at Telluride Film Festival September 3-6, 2010.)

Released in United States Fall November 26, 2010