Paranoid Park


1h 21m 2007

Brief Synopsis

After a young skateboarder accidentally kills a security guard in self-defense with his skateboard at Paranoid Park, he falls into a world of crime, guilt, and fear. He desperately attempts to get out as the investigation into the crime deepens.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Film Noir
Teens
Thriller
Release Date
2007
Production Company
Aon/Albert G. Ruben Insurance Services; Downstream Digital; Entertainment One; Entertainment One Features; Film Finances, Inc.; Fotokem Film & Video; Les Auditoriums De Boulogne; Mk2 International; Mk2 International; Mk2 International; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Post Production Services; Premium Film; Rosen Lewis, Pllc; Wme Entertainment
Distribution Company
First Take (IFC); 35 Milim; A-Film Distribution; Alfa Films; Alphaville; Asociacia Slovenskych Filmovych Klubov (Asfk); Avalon; CinTart; First Take (Ifc); Ifc Entertainment; Imovision; Kino Swiat International; Lucky Red; Madman Entertainment Pty., Ltd.; Megacom Film (Mcf); Metro Tartan Distributors; Mk2 International; Nonstop Entertainment (Nse); PathT International; Peripher Filmverleih; Sponge; Sunrise Film Distribution; Tartan Films; Tour De Force (Tdf); Transilvania Film; Vertigo Films (Spain)
Location
Portland, Oregon, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 21m

Synopsis

After a young skateboarder accidentally kills a security guard in self-defense with his skateboard at Paranoid Park, he falls into a world of crime, guilt, and fear. He desperately attempts to get out as the investigation into the crime deepens.

Crew

Shirak Agresta

Digital Effects Artist

Felix Andrew

Sound Mixer

David Atherton

Makeup

Victoria Austreng

Driver

Bill Bailey

Casting

Caroline Baurez

Production Accountant

Ludwig Van Beethoven

Music

Cora Benesh

Production Assistant

Cora Benesh

Production Assistant

Phil Blackburn

Swing

Christopher Blauvelt

Assistant Camera

Yannick Boulot

Sound Mixer

Colin Brown

Production Assistant

James Buehring

Casting

Jake Buff

Video

Solomon Burbridge

Special Effects Assistant

Ben Burrowes

Casting

Sara Burton

Location Manager

Annabel Callard

Foley Mixer

Ray Di Carlo

Visual Effects Producer

Tyson Carpenter

Grip

Pascal Chauvin

Foley Artist

Kari Coleman

Assistant

Vincent Cosson

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Brett J Cranford

Unit Production Manager

David Allan Cress

Production Coordinator

David Allan Cress

Producer

Patricia Crown

Legal Services

Morgan Currie

Assistant

Dicky Dahl

Editorial Assistant

Henry Davies

Song

Noah Davis

Adr

Mateos Deravenessian

Color Timer

Monica Donati

Publicity

Philippe Donge

Sound Mixer

Claire Dornoy

Production Coordinator

Matt Downer

Song Performer

Christopher Doyle

Director Of Photography

Mark Eifert

Photography

Steve Evans

Driver

Paul Fanning

Electrician

Eric Ferret

Foley Mixer

Thomas Tg Firestone

Assistant Camera

Ryan Fleming

Casting

Bruce Fleskes

Gaffer

Sean Fong

Set Decorator

Rachel Fox

Music

Tarn Fox

Digital Effects Artist

Andrew Gallegos

Electrician

Sally Gates

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Charles Gillibert

Head Of Production

Jenelle Giordano

Swing

Shayna L. Goldstein

Tutor

Eryn Goodman

Casting Assistant

Nate Goodman

Loader

Rahma Goubar

Post-Production Supervisor

Jordan Green

Casting

Scott Green

Photography

Mark Haleston

Driver

Mike Hanauska

Grip

Heather Harlow

Casting

Nicole Hawkins

Casting

Eric Hill

Assistant Editor

Simon Max Hill

Casting

Andrea Hofer

Production Assistant

Steve Hubert

Electrician

Jalal Jemison

Digital Effects Artist

Adam Johnson

Swing

Marin Karmitz

Producer

Nathanaël Karmitz

Producer

Cast King

Song

Cast King

Song Performer

Neil Kopp

Production Coordinator

Neil Kopp

Producer

Patty Kovach

Wardrobe

Thomas Laughlin

Driver

Brent Lawson

Best Boy Grip

Brian Lawson

Grip

Bruce Lawson

Key Grip

Kyle Lemire

Assistant Director

Lori Lewis

Casting Associate

Zach Lewis

Location Manager

Zach Lewis

Visual Effects

Rain Kathy Li

Director Of Photography

Ben Lipsey

Location Manager

Rachel Lipsey

Craft Service

Stephen Macdougall

Assistant Camera

David Manuel

Visual Effects

Matthew May

Electrician

David Mcmurry

Grip

Brandon Medford

Casting

Chip Mefford

Technical Advisor

Taylor Michael

Casting

Adam Morrison

Caterer

Kristenlee Morton

Hair Stylist

Karamy Muessig

Publicity

Amanda Needham

Wardrobe Supervisor

Blake Nelson

Source Material

Robert Normandeau

Song Performer

Robert Normandeau

Song

David Norris

Transportation Captain

Usvaldo Panameno

Song Performer

Bernard Parmegiani

Song Performer

Bernard Parmegiani

Song

John Pearson-denning

Art Director

Mark Pedante

Production Manager

Mark Pedante

Accounting Assistant

Francis Perreard

Consultant

Tyler J Peterson

Product Placement

Drew Pinniger

Property Master

Thomas Platt

Driver

Eliza Plumlee

Production Assistant

Davis Priestley

Production Coordinator

Evan Priestley

Production Assistant

Yona Prost

Production Assistant

Eric Rae

Accounting Assistant

Carlos Ramirez

Song Performer

Carlos Ramirez

Song

Neil Riha

Sound Mixer

Brandon Ritter

Production Assistant

Ethan Rose

Song Performer

Ethan Rose

Song

Carrie Rosen

Casting Assistant

Lance Rosen

Legal Services

Benjamin Rosier

Sound Department

Nino Rota

Song Performer

Jason Ruffolo

Driver

Joe Rynearson

Production Assistant

Luis Salgado

Song Performer

Patrick Sandefur

Production Assistant

Dan Schaeffer

Storyboard Artist

Greg Schmitt

Steadicam Operator

Leslie Shatz

Sound Designer

Jonathan Shinpaugh

Medic

Brian Shotzbarger

Location Manager

Chapin Simpson

Costume Designer

Elliott Smith

Song Performer

Elliott Smith

Song

Jonas Spaccarotelli

Assistant Director

Chris Steele

Electrician

Danny Stoltz

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Billy Swan

Song Performer

Billy Swan

Song

Franck Tassel

Foley Artist

Amy Teitter

Production Assistant

Bernard Telsey

Casting

Tsui-ling Toomer

Visual Effects Producer

Deborah Unger

Production Coordinator

David Vaccari

Casting

Gus Van Sant

Editor

Gus Van Sant

Screenplay

Lana Veenker

Casting Director

Eddie Velasquez

Song Performer

Jonathan Velasquez

Song

Jonathan Velasquez

Song Performer

Laura Vermorel

Legal Counsel

Joe Vitellaro

Grip

Randy Wakerlin

Digital Effects Artist

Scott Walters

Best Boy Electric

Torrey Ward

Song

Chris Webber

Negative Cutter

Jon Weigand

Visual Effects Editor

Chel White

Visual Effects Supervisor

Frances White

Song

Frances White

Song Performer

Ian Young

Production Assistant

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Film Noir
Teens
Thriller
Release Date
2007
Production Company
Aon/Albert G. Ruben Insurance Services; Downstream Digital; Entertainment One; Entertainment One Features; Film Finances, Inc.; Fotokem Film & Video; Les Auditoriums De Boulogne; Mk2 International; Mk2 International; Mk2 International; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Post Production Services; Premium Film; Rosen Lewis, Pllc; Wme Entertainment
Distribution Company
First Take (IFC); 35 Milim; A-Film Distribution; Alfa Films; Alphaville; Asociacia Slovenskych Filmovych Klubov (Asfk); Avalon; CinTart; First Take (Ifc); Ifc Entertainment; Imovision; Kino Swiat International; Lucky Red; Madman Entertainment Pty., Ltd.; Megacom Film (Mcf); Metro Tartan Distributors; Mk2 International; Nonstop Entertainment (Nse); PathT International; Peripher Filmverleih; Sponge; Sunrise Film Distribution; Tartan Films; Tour De Force (Tdf); Transilvania Film; Vertigo Films (Spain)
Location
Portland, Oregon, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 21m

Articles

Paranoid Park - PARANOID PARK - Gus Van Sant's Overlooked 2007 Indie Feature on DVD


Paranoid Park begins as a murder mystery and settles into a character study about a sensitive young skateboarder. Writer-director Gus Van Sant is known for 1997's Good Will Hunting, but his more personal movies tend to be about marginalized Americans, like the petty criminals in Drugstore Cowboy or the intinerant hustlers of My Own Private Idaho. Filmed in and around Van Sant's Portland, Oregon, Paranoid Park takes as its focus a modern teenager beset by a moral dilemma. Introverted young Alex (Gabe Nevins) lives a sort of subsurface urban existence, not fully relating to his family or his friends. Although not a very good skateboarder, Alex loves the sport and is attracted to an unofficial hangout for serious skaters called Paranoid Park. Inexperienced but nobody's fool; Alex realizes that he's too green to deal with some of the tough characters who hang out there.

Paranoid Park teases us with elements of a standard mystery. Alex shuts out the events of a traumatic night at Paranoid Park, the details of which return only when he's summoned with other "skater" teens to be interviewed by a police detective, Richard Lu (Daniel Liu). Alex suddenly has to deal with a horrible secret outside the scope of his experience. The film doesn't pay off as a police story, but instead sketches an interesting young teen worthy of our concern.

A great deal of Van Sant's film simply follows Alex around, recording his spiritual isolation. As if living in an emotional bubble, Alex relates to the world as if it were an abstraction. He seems to hide beneath his mop of uncut hair. He doesn't know or care anything about the Iraq war and barely seems cognizant of his surroundings. Alex is deeply affected by the fact that his parents are divorcing, and doesn't want to cause problems. He escapes from his home life on unapproved adventures with his friends, like visiting the skateboard hangout.

Alex's peers aren't into drugs but they are experimenting with sex; the boys talk constantly about getting laid. For the girls, having sex is a mark of status, something to brag about. The baby-faced Alex is prime boyfriend material for Jennifer (Taylor Momsen of Gossip Girl), a humorless blonde tease. Jennifer corrals the mostly passive boy into a rushed encounter in her own bedroom. When Alex shows little interest in a steady relationship, Jennifer becomes hostile. Her histrionics provide an opportunity door for Macy (Lauren McKinney), a less popular but more diplomatic competitor for Alex's attention.

If Alex can't concentrate, it's because his head is in a serious spin. Detective Lu's grisly photos bring back clear memories of the previous Saturday night at Paranoid Park. Alex drank beer with Scratch (Scott Patrick Green) an early-twenties skate bum with unclear intentions. Scratch teaches Alex how to hop a freight train, which goes well until they're spotted -- and attacked -- by a rail yard security man (John Michael Burrowes). The awful result finds Alex convinced that he's a suspect for murder.

The camera watches Alex walk to and from class and down to a beach to write, using Varispeed camera manipulation and purposeful flash frames. The slow motion underscores Alex's isolation, while music fills the soundtrack: pop hits, classical instrumentals, Nino Rota themes from Juli et of the Spirits. The film texture changes to DVCam and Super-8 during several extended scenes of skateboarding action at the cement park. These style choices are used with restraint and for the most part do not become a distraction.

Director Van Sant gets mixed results from his non-pro actors. Gabe Nevins has perfected the unfocused teenaged stare, which works well enough for his character. Preoccupied by his problems, Alex's dulled responses send mixed signals to Jennifer and Macy. Lauren McKinney is good as the talkative Macy. She knows when to back off, unlike the predatory Jennifer, who demands that Alex get in step with her program and gives him grief when he doesn't. Taylor Momsen's delivery sometimes seems amateurish, but she sounds quite a bit like inexperienced youngsters that affect attitudes beyond their range. Van Sant drops the soundtrack during one of Jennifer's tantrum scenes, possibly because her acting wasn't convincing.

Paranoid Park drifts to a conclusion without resolving its mystery; its aim is clearly to express the disaffected state of a certain strata of today's kids. Whether or not it is successful will be an individual judgment.

Genius Entertainment, Weinstein and IFC Films' DVD of Paranoid Park is a solid presentation of this flat (1:37) picture, with good color and good 5.1 audio. The filming is so basic that we're surprised to see the long credits roll at the conclusion; many of the names are associated with the key 'trauma' scene in the railway yard, which uses CGI to produce a couple of disturbing images. That scene and some rough language account for the film's "R" rating. Sadly, there are no extras. We know that Paranoid Park was sourced from a novel by Blake Nelson, another Portland native and a writer familiar with the slacker lifestyle. The film also won a special prize at Cannes. More information about those aspects and Van Sant's methods with his young cast would have made for an interesting commentary.

For more information about Paranoid Park, visit IFC Films.To order Paranoid Park, go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson
Paranoid Park - Paranoid Park - Gus Van Sant's Overlooked 2007 Indie Feature On Dvd

Paranoid Park - PARANOID PARK - Gus Van Sant's Overlooked 2007 Indie Feature on DVD

Paranoid Park begins as a murder mystery and settles into a character study about a sensitive young skateboarder. Writer-director Gus Van Sant is known for 1997's Good Will Hunting, but his more personal movies tend to be about marginalized Americans, like the petty criminals in Drugstore Cowboy or the intinerant hustlers of My Own Private Idaho. Filmed in and around Van Sant's Portland, Oregon, Paranoid Park takes as its focus a modern teenager beset by a moral dilemma. Introverted young Alex (Gabe Nevins) lives a sort of subsurface urban existence, not fully relating to his family or his friends. Although not a very good skateboarder, Alex loves the sport and is attracted to an unofficial hangout for serious skaters called Paranoid Park. Inexperienced but nobody's fool; Alex realizes that he's too green to deal with some of the tough characters who hang out there. Paranoid Park teases us with elements of a standard mystery. Alex shuts out the events of a traumatic night at Paranoid Park, the details of which return only when he's summoned with other "skater" teens to be interviewed by a police detective, Richard Lu (Daniel Liu). Alex suddenly has to deal with a horrible secret outside the scope of his experience. The film doesn't pay off as a police story, but instead sketches an interesting young teen worthy of our concern. A great deal of Van Sant's film simply follows Alex around, recording his spiritual isolation. As if living in an emotional bubble, Alex relates to the world as if it were an abstraction. He seems to hide beneath his mop of uncut hair. He doesn't know or care anything about the Iraq war and barely seems cognizant of his surroundings. Alex is deeply affected by the fact that his parents are divorcing, and doesn't want to cause problems. He escapes from his home life on unapproved adventures with his friends, like visiting the skateboard hangout. Alex's peers aren't into drugs but they are experimenting with sex; the boys talk constantly about getting laid. For the girls, having sex is a mark of status, something to brag about. The baby-faced Alex is prime boyfriend material for Jennifer (Taylor Momsen of Gossip Girl), a humorless blonde tease. Jennifer corrals the mostly passive boy into a rushed encounter in her own bedroom. When Alex shows little interest in a steady relationship, Jennifer becomes hostile. Her histrionics provide an opportunity door for Macy (Lauren McKinney), a less popular but more diplomatic competitor for Alex's attention. If Alex can't concentrate, it's because his head is in a serious spin. Detective Lu's grisly photos bring back clear memories of the previous Saturday night at Paranoid Park. Alex drank beer with Scratch (Scott Patrick Green) an early-twenties skate bum with unclear intentions. Scratch teaches Alex how to hop a freight train, which goes well until they're spotted -- and attacked -- by a rail yard security man (John Michael Burrowes). The awful result finds Alex convinced that he's a suspect for murder. The camera watches Alex walk to and from class and down to a beach to write, using Varispeed camera manipulation and purposeful flash frames. The slow motion underscores Alex's isolation, while music fills the soundtrack: pop hits, classical instrumentals, Nino Rota themes from Juli et of the Spirits. The film texture changes to DVCam and Super-8 during several extended scenes of skateboarding action at the cement park. These style choices are used with restraint and for the most part do not become a distraction. Director Van Sant gets mixed results from his non-pro actors. Gabe Nevins has perfected the unfocused teenaged stare, which works well enough for his character. Preoccupied by his problems, Alex's dulled responses send mixed signals to Jennifer and Macy. Lauren McKinney is good as the talkative Macy. She knows when to back off, unlike the predatory Jennifer, who demands that Alex get in step with her program and gives him grief when he doesn't. Taylor Momsen's delivery sometimes seems amateurish, but she sounds quite a bit like inexperienced youngsters that affect attitudes beyond their range. Van Sant drops the soundtrack during one of Jennifer's tantrum scenes, possibly because her acting wasn't convincing. Paranoid Park drifts to a conclusion without resolving its mystery; its aim is clearly to express the disaffected state of a certain strata of today's kids. Whether or not it is successful will be an individual judgment. Genius Entertainment, Weinstein and IFC Films' DVD of Paranoid Park is a solid presentation of this flat (1:37) picture, with good color and good 5.1 audio. The filming is so basic that we're surprised to see the long credits roll at the conclusion; many of the names are associated with the key 'trauma' scene in the railway yard, which uses CGI to produce a couple of disturbing images. That scene and some rough language account for the film's "R" rating. Sadly, there are no extras. We know that Paranoid Park was sourced from a novel by Blake Nelson, another Portland native and a writer familiar with the slacker lifestyle. The film also won a special prize at Cannes. More information about those aspects and Van Sant's methods with his young cast would have made for an interesting commentary. For more information about Paranoid Park, visit IFC Films.To order Paranoid Park, go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of two 2008 awards including Best Director and Best Cinematography by the Boston Society of Film Critics (BSFC).

Winner of the 2007 Indepent Spirit Awards' Piaget Producers Award.

Winner of the 60th Anniversary Award at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival.

Released in United States Spring March 7, 2008

Released in United States March 14, 2008

Released in United States on Video October 7, 2008

Released in United States 2007

Released in United States August 2007

Released in United States October 2007

Released in United States December 2007

Released in United States 2008

Shown at Vancouver International Film Festival (Cinema of Our Time) September 27-October 12, 2007.

Shown at New York Film Festival September 28-October 14, 2007.

Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival (Directors' Showcase) August 15-26, 2007.

Shown at Pusan International Film Festival (World Cinema) October 4-12, 2007.

Shown at Dubai International Film Festival (Cinema of the World) December 9-16, 2007.

Shown at Rotterdam International Film Festival (Kings & Aces) January 23-February 3, 2008.

Released in United States Spring March 7, 2008

Released in United States March 14, 2008 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video October 7, 2008

Based on the novel "Paranoid Park" written by Blake Nelson; published by Viking September 21, 2006.

IFC acquired domestic distribution rights at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival.

Released in United States 2007 (Shown at Vancouver International Film Festival (Cinema of Our Time) September 27-October 12, 2007.)

Released in United States 2007 (Shown at New York Film Festival September 28-October 14, 2007.)

Released in United States August 2007 (Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival (Directors' Showcase) August 15-26, 2007.)

Released in United States October 2007 (Shown at Pusan International Film Festival (World Cinema) October 4-12, 2007.)

Released in United States December 2007 (Shown at Dubai International Film Festival (Cinema of the World) December 9-16, 2007.)

Released in United States 2008 (Shown at Rotterdam International Film Festival (Kings & Aces) January 23-February 3, 2008.)