Southland Tales


2h 24m 2007

Brief Synopsis

Set in Los Angeles in the year 2008 during a three day heat wave just before a huge 4th of July celebration, an action star stricken with amnesia meets up with an adult film star developing her own reality television project and a Hermosa Beach police officer who holds the key to a vast conspiracy.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Thriller
Release Date
2007
Distribution Company
Independent Distribution Partnership (IDP)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 24m

Synopsis

Set in Los Angeles in the year 2008 during a three day heat wave just before a huge 4th of July celebration, an action star stricken with amnesia meets up with an adult film star developing her own reality television project and a Hermosa Beach police officer who holds the key to a vast conspiracy.

Crew

Alexis Fallah Abram

Costumer

Craig D Aines

Key Grip

Damon Albarn

Song

Pedro Aleman

Driver

Kenny Alexander

Stunt Player

Julie Altus

Adr

William Ambrose

Rigging Grip

Carlos Amezcua

Other

Hank Amos

Stunt Player

Ray Appel

Driver

Ismael Araujo

Grip

Louis Armstrong

Song Performer

Daniel Arrias

Stunt Player

Michael Asiman

Production Secretary

Sage Asteak

Production Assistant

Brian Edward Avery

Stunt Player

Eric Avery

Song

Adam Avitabile

Digital Effects Artist

Travis Avitabile

Film And Electronic Laboratory

Richard Bain

Carpenter

Lloyd Lee Barnett

Digital Effects Artist

Fernando Barraza

Driver

Patrick J Barry

Assistant Editor

Gerard Bauer

Consultant

Gerard Bauer

Digital Effects Artist

Gerard Bauer

Song

Sam Bauer

Editor

Travis Baumann

Visual Effects Supervisor

Travis Baumann

Compositing Supervisor

Chris Bayol

Animator

Christian Beckman

Special Makeup Effects

Robert Been

Song

Ludwig Van Beethoven

Song

Joshua Bell

Accountant

Matthew Bellamy

Song

Elizabeth Benjamin-rae

Stand-In

Chris Bennett

Electrician

Maxine Bergen

Script Supervisor

Kandice Billingsley

Assistant Location Manager

Craig Bilsky

Film And Electronic Laboratory

Donna Bizzaro

Production Assistant

Vaughn R Bladen

Driver

Mark Blumenthal

Painter

Shawndra Blyle

Driver

Robin Borman-wizan

Costumer

Ray Braemer

Security

Joseph Emil Brandibas Jr.

3-D Artist

Danny Bress

Assistant

Steve Bridgeman

Driver

Wendi Bromley

Stunt Player

Greg Brooks

Dolly Grip

Kevin P Browne

3-D Artist

Steven Buhai

Assistant Director

Jim Butler

Rigging Grip

Jennifer Bydwell

Product Placement

Jay Byerly

Rigging Gaffer

Denny Caira

Transportation Coordinator

J.c. Cantu

Casting Assistant

Kelly Carlton

Main Title Design

Merlin Carroll

Digital Effects Artist

Mark Carter

Assistant Director

Matthew R Cassel

Location Manager

David Castillo

Stunt Player

Karen K Chang

Transportation

Jeff Charles

Film Lab

Dennis R Clark

Driver

Kaiser Clark

Driver

Tim Clarke

Loader

Ron Cobb

Concept Artist

Travis Cohen

Stand-In

Vidal Cohen

Key Grip

David Cole

Color Timer

Maria Coloroso

Stunt Player

Norm Compton

Stunt Player

Eddie Conna

Stunt Player

Laura Connolly

Hair

Tim Connolly

Stunt Player

Mark S Constance

Assistant Director

Shane Cook

Digital Effects Artist

Larry Corralez

Painter

Mark Cotone

Assistant Director

Graham Coxon

Song

Henry Creamer

Song

Michael Cruickshank

Assistant Camera

Esteban Cueto

Stunt Player

Jeff Culotta

Assistant

Peter Cvijanovic

Digital Effects Artist

Enid Dalkoff

Digital Effects Artist

Chris David

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Ron Davis

Accountant

Yves De Bono

Special Effects Coordinator

Frank De Vol

Song

Frank De Vol

Song Performer

Rebekah Del Rio

Other

Rebekah Del Rio

Song Performer

David Deleon

Makeup Artist

Guillaume Delouche

Property Master

Craig Demartini

Film Lab

Marguerite Derricks

Choreographer

Robert Deschane

Adr Mixer

Drew Devine

Foreman

Peter Devlin

Sound Recordist

Kyle Devriendt

Film Lab

Jim Dominello

Assistant

Jorge C Dorado

Construction

William Dorsey Jr.

Painter

Scott Dougan

Production Assistant

Tracey A Doyle

Set Decorator

Joshua M Dragotta

Assistant Location Manager

Mark Driscoll

Visual Effects

Doc Duhame

Stunt Player

Dan Duncan

Stunt Player

Mathew Duncan

Sound Mixer

Brian Dunlop

Assistant Sound Editor

David Dwiggins

Assistant Director

Jace Dwinell

Graphics

Scott M Dwyer

Special Effects Technician

Chris Eakins

Sound Editor

Valance Eisleben

Film Lab

R Ellen

Song

Priscilla Elliott

Assistant Art Director

Tom Elliott

Stunt Player

Richie Elson

Production Assistant

Heather Elwell

Art Department Coordinator

David Esparza

Supervising Sound Editor

Fernando Espinosa

Caterer

Antonio Evans

Medic

Debbie Evans

Stunt Player

Michael Evans

Best Boy Electric

Zach Fannin

Graphic Designer

Perry Farrell

Song

Leila Feinstein

Other

April Ferry

Costume Designer

David Ferry

Costumer

Susan Fitz-simon

Foley Artist

Jenny Fitzgibbons

Production Accountant

Anna Fleiner

Makeup Artist

George Flores

Boom Operator

Brandon Flowers

Song

Fred Foster

Song

Jenny Foster

Visual Effects Producer

Black Francis

Song

Elise Freimuth

Assistant

Wally Frick

Transportation Captain

Darin Fujimori

Stunt Player

Richard Garcia

Driver

Tom Garelick

Film Lab

Marshall Garlington

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Guy Garvey

Song

Sarah Michelle Gellar

Song Performer

Joseph Di Gennaro

Camera Operator

Michael Gilden

Stunt Player

Michael Gillis

Assistant Director

Justin Giugno

Production Assistant

Karen Golden

Script Supervisor

Roger Good

Driver

Ken Gorrell

Special Effects Foreman

Al Goto

Stunt Player

Jim Gowdy

Accounting Assistant

Joseph Gray

Foreman

Tony Greasley

Driver

Casey Green

Video Playback

Colin Greenwood

Song

Jonathan Greenwood

Song

Mike Gregorio

Driver

Ed Gutentag

Camera Operator

Christian Hagele

Driver

James Halty

Stunt Player

Jennifer Hamilton

Assistant

Ted Hamm

Executive Producer

Alexander Hammond

Production Designer

Julie Hansen

Post-Production Accountant

Sam Hara

Driver

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Terence Harris

Casting Associate

Stan Harrison

Video Assist/Playback

Anita Hart

Stunt Player

Coleman L. Hart

Best Boy Grip

Peter Hayes

Song

Bill Heath

Best Boy Grip

Bill Heiden

Software Engineer

Ryan Heiferman

Adr Mixer

Judy Heinzen

Assistant Location Manager

Oliver Hengst

Executive Producer

Alisa Hensley-lane

Stunt Player

Leo A Hernandez

Security

Michelle Herrin

Visual Effects Editor

Mike Hinkle

Construction

Keith Hodne

Adr Mixer

Beck Hoehn

Assistant Camera

David Holden

Driver

Catharina Hourcade

Production Coordinator

Adam Howard

Craft Service

Dominic Howard

Song

Daniel E Howell

Driver

Loretta Huggett

Driver

Bo Hyde

Producer

Katarina K Hyde

Executive Producer

Annika Iltis

Loader

Charles Ingram

Stunt Player

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Thriller
Release Date
2007
Distribution Company
Independent Distribution Partnership (IDP)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 24m

Articles

Southland Tales - SOUTHLAND TALES - A Strange Blend of Sci-Fi & Dark Comedy from the Director of "Donnie Darko"


Movies that polarize the critics and divide the room as thoroughly as did Southland Tales (2006), the sophomore feature for Donnie Darko (2001) writer-director Richard Kelly, develop in their self-immolation a kind of must-see magnetism – call it the Heaven's Gate Effect, after the orgy of critical negativity and harsh word of mouth accompanying the release of Michael Cimino's controversial 1980 revisionist western. Everybody loves a disaster, it seems, and Southland Tales (which in fact features a doomed dirigible in its last act) cast a particularly Hindenburg-like glow over the international film community. Its disastrous reception at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival is the stuff of legend: audience members booed the film from its first frames and stormed out of the theater in disgust. (Not all that unusual for Cannes, it should be mentioned.) Back in the States, big name critics like Roger Ebert and Variety's Todd McCarthy were among the more vocal howlers while dissenting voices included The Village Voice's J. Hoberman, Manohla Dargis in The New York Times and Amy Taubin in Film Comment, whose praise was as sincere as it was unpersuasive. For the sake of a distribution deal, Kelly went back into the editing room and lost twenty minutes of footage, delivering a director's cut-down still in excess of two hours. The film's opening numbers were drab and Southland Tales was duly remaindered to DVD, where the hoi polloi can now decide for themselves whether it is a disaster of The Brown Bunny (2003) proportion or an ahead-of-its-time cult classic on par with The Wizard of Oz (1939) and It's a Wonderful Life (1946).

Even a staunch Kellian like Manohla Dargis admits that Southland Tales is no masterpiece. What's most remarkable about this sprawling apocalypse scenario, with literally dozens of speaking parts and a dazzling patina of sci-fi effects, is how minor it really is – minor not as in personal, regional or small in scale but as in ineffectual, piddling, beside the point. One doesn't mind the stampede of film references (to Robert Aldrich's Kiss Me Deadly, Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction, Bernardo Bertolucci's The Conformist, Alex Cox's Repo Man and George Lucas' original Star Wars trilogy) because that's the soul of the intertextual plot but Southland Tales is far too self-amused and even smug for its own good, which gives one less patience for its enervating asides and longueurs. The political humor is flat and obvious (Republicans are anal Bible Belt hayseeds while lefties are rhetoric-spouting dreadlocked anarcho-bladers). The out-of-left-field principal casting of Dwayne Johnson (formerly The Rock) and Sara Michelle Geller (formerly TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer) is more interesting than revelatory while the parade of former Saturday Night Live troupers (Jon Lovitz, Nora Dunn, Cheri Oteri and Amy Poehler) in supporting roles is disappointing because they mostly rely on their typical shtick. (That said, it feels like a mercy killing whenever a Not Ready for Prime Time Player goes down in a hail of automatic gunfire and squib juice.) Richard Kelly is a self-professed fan of David Lynch, which explains this film's reliance on nonlinear narrative chicanery but Southland Tales lacks the blood-born perversity and the flat-out personality of Lost Highway (1997) and Mulholland Dr. (2001), which dealt more successfully (if no less maddeningly) with portents and symbols and the end of the world, if only as we know it. There are occasional moments of brilliance, such as the curtain warmer depiction of the destruction of Texas on the Fourth of July 2005, but a handful of grace notes can't conceal the bloat of this fat lip of a movie, which feels very much like a student thesis blown out of all useful proportion.

Whatever its faults as a piece of storytelling, Southland Tales is a gorgeous piece of filmmaking. What no doubt looked bright and clear on the big screen has been well preserved on the single disc DVD from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. Letterboxed at an anamorphic 2.40:1, the widescreen image is clear and abundantly colorful, making the blimp's eye views of downtown Los Angeles and the street level depiction of grubby Venice Beach equally impressive. The disc's Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack is also strong and clear. In short, this disc is presentation material. Extras are limited to the 30-minute making-of featurette USIdent TV: Surveilling the Southland, presented as surveillance footage, and the 9-minute apocalyptic animated short This is the Way the World Ends. English, French and Spanish subtitles are optional but essential if you've ever wanted to know how to say "Don't rock the cock" in other languages.

For more information about Southland Tales, visit Sony Pictures. To order Southland Tales, go to TCM Shopping

by Richard Harland Smith
Southland Tales - Southland Tales - A Strange Blend Of Sci-Fi & Dark Comedy From The Director Of "donnie Darko"

Southland Tales - SOUTHLAND TALES - A Strange Blend of Sci-Fi & Dark Comedy from the Director of "Donnie Darko"

Movies that polarize the critics and divide the room as thoroughly as did Southland Tales (2006), the sophomore feature for Donnie Darko (2001) writer-director Richard Kelly, develop in their self-immolation a kind of must-see magnetism – call it the Heaven's Gate Effect, after the orgy of critical negativity and harsh word of mouth accompanying the release of Michael Cimino's controversial 1980 revisionist western. Everybody loves a disaster, it seems, and Southland Tales (which in fact features a doomed dirigible in its last act) cast a particularly Hindenburg-like glow over the international film community. Its disastrous reception at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival is the stuff of legend: audience members booed the film from its first frames and stormed out of the theater in disgust. (Not all that unusual for Cannes, it should be mentioned.) Back in the States, big name critics like Roger Ebert and Variety's Todd McCarthy were among the more vocal howlers while dissenting voices included The Village Voice's J. Hoberman, Manohla Dargis in The New York Times and Amy Taubin in Film Comment, whose praise was as sincere as it was unpersuasive. For the sake of a distribution deal, Kelly went back into the editing room and lost twenty minutes of footage, delivering a director's cut-down still in excess of two hours. The film's opening numbers were drab and Southland Tales was duly remaindered to DVD, where the hoi polloi can now decide for themselves whether it is a disaster of The Brown Bunny (2003) proportion or an ahead-of-its-time cult classic on par with The Wizard of Oz (1939) and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). Even a staunch Kellian like Manohla Dargis admits that Southland Tales is no masterpiece. What's most remarkable about this sprawling apocalypse scenario, with literally dozens of speaking parts and a dazzling patina of sci-fi effects, is how minor it really is – minor not as in personal, regional or small in scale but as in ineffectual, piddling, beside the point. One doesn't mind the stampede of film references (to Robert Aldrich's Kiss Me Deadly, Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction, Bernardo Bertolucci's The Conformist, Alex Cox's Repo Man and George Lucas' original Star Wars trilogy) because that's the soul of the intertextual plot but Southland Tales is far too self-amused and even smug for its own good, which gives one less patience for its enervating asides and longueurs. The political humor is flat and obvious (Republicans are anal Bible Belt hayseeds while lefties are rhetoric-spouting dreadlocked anarcho-bladers). The out-of-left-field principal casting of Dwayne Johnson (formerly The Rock) and Sara Michelle Geller (formerly TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer) is more interesting than revelatory while the parade of former Saturday Night Live troupers (Jon Lovitz, Nora Dunn, Cheri Oteri and Amy Poehler) in supporting roles is disappointing because they mostly rely on their typical shtick. (That said, it feels like a mercy killing whenever a Not Ready for Prime Time Player goes down in a hail of automatic gunfire and squib juice.) Richard Kelly is a self-professed fan of David Lynch, which explains this film's reliance on nonlinear narrative chicanery but Southland Tales lacks the blood-born perversity and the flat-out personality of Lost Highway (1997) and Mulholland Dr. (2001), which dealt more successfully (if no less maddeningly) with portents and symbols and the end of the world, if only as we know it. There are occasional moments of brilliance, such as the curtain warmer depiction of the destruction of Texas on the Fourth of July 2005, but a handful of grace notes can't conceal the bloat of this fat lip of a movie, which feels very much like a student thesis blown out of all useful proportion. Whatever its faults as a piece of storytelling, Southland Tales is a gorgeous piece of filmmaking. What no doubt looked bright and clear on the big screen has been well preserved on the single disc DVD from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. Letterboxed at an anamorphic 2.40:1, the widescreen image is clear and abundantly colorful, making the blimp's eye views of downtown Los Angeles and the street level depiction of grubby Venice Beach equally impressive. The disc's Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack is also strong and clear. In short, this disc is presentation material. Extras are limited to the 30-minute making-of featurette USIdent TV: Surveilling the Southland, presented as surveillance footage, and the 9-minute apocalyptic animated short This is the Way the World Ends. English, French and Spanish subtitles are optional but essential if you've ever wanted to know how to say "Don't rock the cock" in other languages. For more information about Southland Tales, visit Sony Pictures. To order Southland Tales, go to TCM Shopping by Richard Harland Smith

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States November 14, 2007

Released in United States Fall November 14, 2007

Released in United States on Video March 18, 2008

Released in United States November 2007

Film is being produced outside Cherry Road's first look deal with Warner Independent Pictures.

Limited Release in United States November 14, 2007 (NY, LA)

Released in United States Fall November 14, 2007

Released in United States on Video March 18, 2008

Released in United States November 2007 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Special Screenings) November 1-11, 2007.)