Bug


1h 42m 2006

Brief Synopsis

A lonely waitress with a tragic past, Agnes rooms in a run-down motel, living in fear of her abusive, recently paroled ex-husband. But when Agnes begins a tentative romance with Peter, an eccentric, nervous drifter, she starts to feel hopeful again--until the first bugs arrive.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
2006
Distribution Company
Lionsgate
Location
New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

A lonely waitress with a tragic past, Agnes rooms in a run-down motel, living in fear of her abusive, recently paroled ex-husband. But when Agnes begins a tentative romance with Peter, an eccentric, nervous drifter, she starts to feel hopeful again--until the first bugs arrive.

Crew

Ronald Abrams

Location Manager

Jillian Amburgey

Script Supervisor

Kimberly C Anderson

Producer

Michael Applebaum

Camera Operator

Gordon Ard

Grip

Tarry Kelly August

Driver

Stephen Baloga

Caterer

Markus Barben

Caterer

Bob Bates

Swing

Bob Bates

Best Boy

Paul Beard

Best Boy Grip

Barry Bedig

Consultant

Barry Bedig

Property Master

Ron Bedrosian

Adr Mixer

Robert Beebe

Titles

Trant Bell

Song

Greg Black

Sound

Karen Blender

Makeup

Steve Boeddeker

Sound Designer

Nathan Borck

Swing

Natalie Borlaug

Set Production Assistant

Gail Briant

Scenic Artist

Michael Burns

Producer

Jon C Callensen

Best Boy Electric

Michael J. Campbell

Assistant Editor

David Capitano

Art Department

Franco Carbone

Art Director

Franco Carbone

Production Designer

Buddy Carr

Dolly Grip

Gregory S. Carr

Office Production Assistant

Rafiel Chait

Camera Operator

Gilly Charbonnet

Key Grip

Chris Cornell

Song Performer

Chris Cornell

Song

Nickel Creek

Song Performer

Arvid Cristina

Office Production Assistant

Brandon Cunningham

Swing

Kevin Davis

Carpenter

Suzanne Dietz

Photography

Patrick Doane

Grip

Jean-jacques Duplessis

Production Assistant

Guido Egger

Grip

Ronald Eng

Supervising Sound Editor

Michael Eppling

Painter

Harland Espeset

Dolly Grip

Brian Evans

Accounting Assistant

Anne Fader

Production

Jay Faires

Music Supervisor

Joaquin Farinas

Caterer

Jamie Fernandez

On-Set Dresser

Stephen Finders

Props

Kelly Flynn

Production Assistant

Christine Fontana

Assistant Production Coordinator

Boyd Ford

Driver

Donny Ray Ford

Song

Dana Le Blanc Frankley

Assistant Sound Editor

Marcia Franklin

Assistant

Tony Friedkin

Photography

Christian C Froude

Accountant

Michael Grady

Dp/Cinematographer

Michael Grady

Director Of Photography

Roger S Graham

Driver

Daphne Guichard

Medic

Caleb Guillote

Art Department Coordinator

Terry Haggar

Color Timer

Tom Hambridge

Song

Nathan Hardcastle

Transportation

Loretta Harper

Costumer

Greg Harris

Carpenter

Kim Harris

Foreman

Kim Harris

Carpenter

Geno Hart

Transportation Coordinator

Jeffrey Haupt

Sound Mixer

Ruby C Haupt

Boom Operator

Penelope Helmer

Driver

Mo Henry

Negative Cutter

Charles Thomas Hinson

Rigging Grip

Erica Hirsch

Production

Jesse Homan

Best Boy Grip

Gary Huckabay

Producer

Aubrey Husar

Key Grip

Kirk Huston

Transportation Captain

Roy Irwin

Medic

Doug Jackson

Sound Effects Editor

Petra Jolly

Song

Petra Jolly

Song Performer

Steve J. Jones

Carpenter

Michael I Karasick

Gaffer

Victor Keatley

Rigging Gaffer

Ruth Kelser

Production Coordinator

Dave Kelsey

Painter

Dianne Kennedy

Costume Supervisor

Chainsaw Kittens

Song Performer

Gary Krause

Music Editor

Jon Kuyper

Unit Production Manager

Jon Kuyper

Line Producer

A. Welch Lambeth

Transportation Coordinator

Bret D. Lang

Art Department

R Scott Lebell

Grip

Jerry Leiber

Song

Jerry Leiber

Song Performer

Nick Leon

Grip

Tracy Letts

Source Material

Tracy Letts

Screenplay

Aaron Levy

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Allen Linker

Set Production Assistant

Joe Lisanti

Music Editor

Tory Littman

Craft Service

Stephen Lonano

Assistant Director

Luis Enrique Lopez

Song

Ryan Maguire

Foley Mixer

Mark Matzher

Song

Clint Mcbay

Song

Michael Mcgrath

Production Assistant

Peter Mckernan

Helicopter Pilot

Lee Mclemore

Rigging Grip

Tyson Meade

Song

Patrick Melville

Hair Stylist

Beth Miller

Hair

Beth Miller

Hair Stylist

Jennifer Miller

Production Assistant

Brian Morena

Photography

David Nami

Special Effects Supervisor

David Nash

Special Effects Technician

Darrin Navarro

Editor

Russell Nordstedt

Grip

Louis Normandin

Rigging Grip

Christopher S. O'sullivan Iii

Driver

Michael Ohoven

Executive Producer

Telly Ordoyne

Painter

Willard Overstreet

Foley Editor

Josie Parden

Apprentice

Allen Parks

Swing

Dave Perkal

Camera Operator

Joel Perkal

Photography

Joel Perkal

Camera

J Malcolm Petal

Producer

Buddy Pine

Driver

David Pirinelli

On-Set Dresser

Cali Pomes

Set Production Assistant

Aaron Preston

Song

Richard Ralston

Gaffer

Virle Reid

Assistant Property Master

John Richie

Loader

Kenny Rivenbark

Crane Grip

Alvin Robinson

Song Performer

Maggie Rolland

Production Assistant

Michelle Rolland

Property Master

Catherine Rowe

Foley Artist

Sean Rowe

Foley Artist

Leon Russell

Song

Leon Russell

Song Performer

Declan Ryan

Swing

Michael Salven

Assistant Director

Andreas Schardt

Producer

Peggy Schnitzer

Costume Designer

Dan Seekman

Office Assistant

Jim Seibel

Executive Producer

Maria T. Senger

Apprentice

Chris Shadley

Video Assist/Playback

Tony Shandra

Accountant

Guy Skinner

Camera Operator

Raymond Slack

Driver

Chris Spear

Assistant

Giselle Spence

Tailor

M. S. Spranley Jr.

Accountant

Ron Stanik

Assistant Editor

Brent Stewart

Foreman

Mike Stoller

Song

Lisbeth Storandt

Photography

Gunnar Swanson

Hair

Stacey L Taniguchi

Makeup

Serj Tankian

Song

Serj Tankian

Music

Serj Tankian

Song Performer

Pat Tantalo

Special Effects Foreman

Susan Tedeschi

Song

Susan Tedeschi

Song Performer

Bonnie Timmermann

Casting

Bonnie Timmermann

Coproducer

Christien Tinsley

Special Makeup Effects

James Troost

Swing

Robert Troy

Dialogue Editor

Marcus Turchi

Carpenter

Marcus Turchi

Gang Boss

David Tureau

Greensman

Sven Tusak

Loader

Brian Tyler

Original Music

Robert Ulrich

Adr Editor

Tedd Underwood

Swing

Robert Vazquez

Special Effects Supervisor

Tracey Viera

Photography

Lynda Vincent

Photography

Stephen Vincent

Casting Associate

Jey Wada

Assistant Director

Pamala Waggoner

Set Costumer

Candy L Walken

Hair

Natasha Walsh

Key Costumer

Sean Watkins

Song

Michael Weeks

Swing

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
2006
Distribution Company
Lionsgate
Location
New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Articles

Bug (Special Edition) - William Friedkin's BUG - The Special Edition on DVD


For its brief theater run just four months ago, William Friedkin's Bug was misleadingly advertised as a horror film. Although based on frightening and repellent ideas, Tracy Letts' play is more of a psychological study in acute paranoia. The well-developed film version is basically an extended one-act play of very high quality, a more intense version of something we might have seen on an hour-long Alfred Hitchcock Presents or The Twilight Zone. Definitely not a feel-good experience, Bug makes one's skin crawl.

Synopsis: Dissolute, sexually-undecided bargirl Agnes White (Ashley Judd) has nothing but problems, the biggest of which is her jailbird ex-husband Jerry Gross (Harry Connick Jr.), who can't seem to understand that she's no longer his personal property. Agnes's sense of worthlessness may be sourced in the disappearance of her 8 year-old son, who has yet to be found. Agnes's heavy-drinking girlfriend and sometime lover R.C. (Lynn Collins) parks a lonely drifter with Agnes for a night. Peter Evans (Michael Shannon) is at first shy and unimposing until Agnes begs to know why the Army is looking for him. Peter waits until Agnes is emotionally committed before explaining that he was used by military doctors in a horrible experiment with living parasites ...

An impressive drama and a sustained acting tour-de-force for its entire cast, Bug is one of those movies that falls into a troublesome niche. Viewed cold, with no foreknowledge of its subject matter, it works like a polished stage play. We first expect a film about troubled lowlifes on the prairie, with Ashley Judd and Lynn Collins engaged in a lesbian affair. Then we worry that Ashley's Agnes White will become the victim of her menacing ex-husband Jerry, played with great skill by Harry Connick Jr.. Plagued by someone playing cruel phone games and far too vulnerable in her crummy motel room, Agnes is also a prime candidate for slasher-film martyrdom.

Michael Shannon's ambiguous Peter Evans enters the picture as a combination of reassuring and worrisome elements. He's not a threatening goon like Jerry, but he's certainly weird. It's not long before Peter brings a different kind of menace to Agnes's life, a psychological 'infestation' more powerful than anything Jerry can muster.

The title Bug suggests insect monsters, like William Castle's thirty year-old creature feature with the same title. Tracy Letts shows a different kind of terror at work, a festering paranoia easily transferred to from person to person. Agnes helps Peter hide from the army doctors he claims are on his trail, while dealing with the frightening effects of the experiments done to him against his will. By limiting our knowledge to what Agnes knows, Bug pulls us into its hysterical chain of surprises.

The play/movie encourages a deeper reading. Cut off from life's mainstream, the disenchanted characters retreat into alienated states. Jerry is an outlaw sociopath probably destined for more jail time. R.C. is a party girl with more options than the others. She does what she can for Agnes and wisely takes off when things get too weird. Brian F. O'Byrne plays Dr. Sweet, who tracks Peter down to Agnes' motel room. Sweet's measured sincerity may be authentic, or he may be exactly the kind of deceiver that Peter says he is.

Agnes and Peter are pathetic kooks who lose their grip on reality, but they're not all that different from the rest of society. Many of us are cut off from a real sense of social belonging, and almost all of us rely on tainted sources of information to draw our judgments about the world around us. There are documented cases of the military engaging in horrendous experiments on unknowing soldiers, so finding the line between rational skepticism and paranoid hysteria is not easy. We're also bombarded with conflicting messages about dangers in the food we eat and the air we breathe, so the idea that some unforeseen contagion could bring us down is not all that farfetched. What about pesticides, asbestos, or the dust at Ground Zero of the World Trade Center? The side effects patter on the drug ads shown during the 6 O'Clock News is a kind of horror movie in itself.

It would be damaging to the viewing experience to explain Bug in more detail. Agnes and Peter form a strong but definitely destructive relationship; being beaten by Jerry Gross has a more promising outcome. William Friedkin directs the movie with great skill, focusing our attentions on the characters without heavy stylistic effects, and emphasizing the way that one person's mania reinforces another's. Agnes' sexual vitality and sense of remorse for her son seems to fuel Peter's all-enveloping belief in a massive conspiracy. The show helps us understand how, if led by a dynamic personality, militant separatists and cultish worshippers could easily drive themselves to a terrible fate. If Bug is a horror movie, it belongs to a new subgenre of paranoid thriller.

Lionsgate's Special Edition DVD of Bug is a beautiful enhanced transfer of a film with dark, rich images. William Friedkin's commentary has a bit too much play-by-play description but he does convey how the play captured his imagination. In a separate lengthy interview section he answers specific questions about his career, the film and his ideas of where movies are going. He's honest about his own screen work, acknowledging that in the 1970s he had the freedom to do anything he wanted, but now must work for years to assemble the financing package to get a film made. BUG, an Introduction is a better than average making-of featurette. Subtitles are offered in English and Spanish.

For more information about Bug, visit Lionsgate Home Entertainment. To order Bug, go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson
Bug (Special Edition) - William Friedkin's Bug - The Special Edition On Dvd

Bug (Special Edition) - William Friedkin's BUG - The Special Edition on DVD

For its brief theater run just four months ago, William Friedkin's Bug was misleadingly advertised as a horror film. Although based on frightening and repellent ideas, Tracy Letts' play is more of a psychological study in acute paranoia. The well-developed film version is basically an extended one-act play of very high quality, a more intense version of something we might have seen on an hour-long Alfred Hitchcock Presents or The Twilight Zone. Definitely not a feel-good experience, Bug makes one's skin crawl. Synopsis: Dissolute, sexually-undecided bargirl Agnes White (Ashley Judd) has nothing but problems, the biggest of which is her jailbird ex-husband Jerry Gross (Harry Connick Jr.), who can't seem to understand that she's no longer his personal property. Agnes's sense of worthlessness may be sourced in the disappearance of her 8 year-old son, who has yet to be found. Agnes's heavy-drinking girlfriend and sometime lover R.C. (Lynn Collins) parks a lonely drifter with Agnes for a night. Peter Evans (Michael Shannon) is at first shy and unimposing until Agnes begs to know why the Army is looking for him. Peter waits until Agnes is emotionally committed before explaining that he was used by military doctors in a horrible experiment with living parasites ... An impressive drama and a sustained acting tour-de-force for its entire cast, Bug is one of those movies that falls into a troublesome niche. Viewed cold, with no foreknowledge of its subject matter, it works like a polished stage play. We first expect a film about troubled lowlifes on the prairie, with Ashley Judd and Lynn Collins engaged in a lesbian affair. Then we worry that Ashley's Agnes White will become the victim of her menacing ex-husband Jerry, played with great skill by Harry Connick Jr.. Plagued by someone playing cruel phone games and far too vulnerable in her crummy motel room, Agnes is also a prime candidate for slasher-film martyrdom. Michael Shannon's ambiguous Peter Evans enters the picture as a combination of reassuring and worrisome elements. He's not a threatening goon like Jerry, but he's certainly weird. It's not long before Peter brings a different kind of menace to Agnes's life, a psychological 'infestation' more powerful than anything Jerry can muster. The title Bug suggests insect monsters, like William Castle's thirty year-old creature feature with the same title. Tracy Letts shows a different kind of terror at work, a festering paranoia easily transferred to from person to person. Agnes helps Peter hide from the army doctors he claims are on his trail, while dealing with the frightening effects of the experiments done to him against his will. By limiting our knowledge to what Agnes knows, Bug pulls us into its hysterical chain of surprises. The play/movie encourages a deeper reading. Cut off from life's mainstream, the disenchanted characters retreat into alienated states. Jerry is an outlaw sociopath probably destined for more jail time. R.C. is a party girl with more options than the others. She does what she can for Agnes and wisely takes off when things get too weird. Brian F. O'Byrne plays Dr. Sweet, who tracks Peter down to Agnes' motel room. Sweet's measured sincerity may be authentic, or he may be exactly the kind of deceiver that Peter says he is. Agnes and Peter are pathetic kooks who lose their grip on reality, but they're not all that different from the rest of society. Many of us are cut off from a real sense of social belonging, and almost all of us rely on tainted sources of information to draw our judgments about the world around us. There are documented cases of the military engaging in horrendous experiments on unknowing soldiers, so finding the line between rational skepticism and paranoid hysteria is not easy. We're also bombarded with conflicting messages about dangers in the food we eat and the air we breathe, so the idea that some unforeseen contagion could bring us down is not all that farfetched. What about pesticides, asbestos, or the dust at Ground Zero of the World Trade Center? The side effects patter on the drug ads shown during the 6 O'Clock News is a kind of horror movie in itself. It would be damaging to the viewing experience to explain Bug in more detail. Agnes and Peter form a strong but definitely destructive relationship; being beaten by Jerry Gross has a more promising outcome. William Friedkin directs the movie with great skill, focusing our attentions on the characters without heavy stylistic effects, and emphasizing the way that one person's mania reinforces another's. Agnes' sexual vitality and sense of remorse for her son seems to fuel Peter's all-enveloping belief in a massive conspiracy. The show helps us understand how, if led by a dynamic personality, militant separatists and cultish worshippers could easily drive themselves to a terrible fate. If Bug is a horror movie, it belongs to a new subgenre of paranoid thriller. Lionsgate's Special Edition DVD of Bug is a beautiful enhanced transfer of a film with dark, rich images. William Friedkin's commentary has a bit too much play-by-play description but he does convey how the play captured his imagination. In a separate lengthy interview section he answers specific questions about his career, the film and his ideas of where movies are going. He's honest about his own screen work, acknowledging that in the 1970s he had the freedom to do anything he wanted, but now must work for years to assemble the financing package to get a film made. BUG, an Introduction is a better than average making-of featurette. Subtitles are offered in English and Spanish. For more information about Bug, visit Lionsgate Home Entertainment. To order Bug, go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the FIPRESCI award (Directors' Fortnight) at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival.

Released in United States Summer May 25, 2007

Released in United States on Video September 25, 2007

Released in United States 2006

Released in United States November 2006

Shown at London Film Festival (Film on the Square) October 18-November 2, 2006.

Based on the current Off Broadway play "Bug" written by Tracy Letts, which began its run February 29, 2004.

Released in United States Summer May 25, 2007

Released in United States on Video September 25, 2007

Released in United States 2006 (Shown at London Film Festival (Film on the Square) October 18-November 2, 2006.)

Released in United States November 2006 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles Film Festival (Special Presentation) November 1-12, 2006.)