Breakin' All the Rules


1h 25m 2004

Brief Synopsis

After being unceremoniously dumped by his fiancée, Quincy Watson pens a "how to" book on breaking up and becomes a best-selling author on the subject. Not wanting his male friends to suffer the same fate, Quincy gives them advice on dumping their mates.

Film Details

Also Known As
Breakin all the Rules, Breaking All the Rules, Breakup Handbook, The
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
Screen Gems
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Synopsis

After being unceremoniously dumped by his fiancée, Quincy Watson pens a "how to" book on breaking up and becomes a best-selling author on the subject. Not wanting his male friends to suffer the same fate, Quincy gives them advice on dumping their mates.

Crew

Todd Michael Amateau

Assistant Director

Joe Aranda

Caterer

Lyle Atkins

Driver

Justine Baddeley

Casting Director

Serena A Baker

Assistant Location Manager

Mike Ballew

Transportation Co-Captain

Toussaint Banks

Set Production Assistant

Aaron L Baszile

Craft Service

Jennifer Bendror

Art Department Coordinator

Gabriel Benvenuto

Assistant

Betty Berberian

Set Decorator

Joseph Bingenheimer

Driver

Peter Borck

Art Director

Steve Brodsky

Driver

Mark Byers

Special Effects Supervisor

Candice Carella

Costumer

Beth Carter

Makeup Artist

Steve Castaneda

Electrician

Robert L Catron

Accountant

David Chernow

Sound Mixer

Elisa Choice

Stand-In

David Chornow

Sound Mixer

Curtis E Clark

Driver

Linda Cohen

Music

Judy Cook

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Peter M Coquillard

Music Supervisor

Shawn Coulter

Driver

Erica Courtney

Other

Orion Cox

On-Set Dresser

Paddy Cullen

Executive Producer

Joy A D'arcy

Animal Trainer

Joy A D'arcy

Animal Trainer

Johnny T Davis

Driver

Mark Shane Davis

Key Grip

Kim Davis-wagner

Casting

Sean Justin Dent

Craft Service

Lance Despain

Scenic Artist

Chris Devicariis

Assistant Property Master

Joseph Digiandomenico

Apprentice Editor

Deidra Dixon

Hair Stylist

Jay Duerr

Music Editor

Will Durham

On-Set Dresser

Brent Egan

Loader

Catherine Engel

Casting Assistant

Arash Esfandi

Set Production Assistant

Tim Falconer

Location Scout

Jerry Fleming

Production Designer

Stephen Hunter Flick

Dialogue Editor

Stephen Hunter Flick

Adr

Robert Foulkes

Location Manager

Robert Frazen

Editor

Laurel Frushour

Costumer

Daniel Gabbe

Assistant Editor

Ryan Garvey

Caterer

Jon Gearhart

Driver

Stacy Gibson

Makeup Artist

Ron Greenwood

Stand-In

Mari Grimaud

Costume Supervisor

Kimberly Guidone

Assistant

Vincent Guisetti

Foley Artist

Wade Hagen

Accounting Assistant

Kevin Halloran

Coproducer

Kevin Halloran

Line Producer

Kevin Halloran

Unit Production Manager

Leslie Hamilton

Assistant Camera

Glenn Dash Hartley

Driver

Najj Hasan Ii

Stand-In

David Hennings

Director Of Photography

Jennifer Henry

Assistant Camera

Guy Herman

Props

Scott Hillman

Key Rigging Grip

George A Hock

Rigging Gaffer

Chad Holland

Caterer

Demetricus Holloway

Costumer

Ethan Holtzman

Sound

Ron Hugo

Location Scout

Robert L Husk

Driver

Jerrold Mckinley Ivery

Assistant

Alfie Jensen

Driver

Ethan Jensen

Stunt Coordinator

Sergio Jimenez

Caterer

Jeffrey Paul Johnson

Property Master

Kent Johnson

Visual Effects Producer

Devin Joseph

Dialogue Editor

Cameron K

Stand-In

Pamela Nedd Kahn

Foley Artist

Michael Keys

Driver

Jasmine Kimble

Hair Stylist

Kimberly Kimble

Hair

Lashan Knox

Set Production Assistant

Andrew Kopjak

Set Production Assistant

John W Kristopik

Electrician

Steve Larson

Transportation Manager

Coy Lawson

On-Set Dresser

Alex Leyton

Camera Operator

Lalette Littlejohn

Makeup

Howard London

Adr Mixer

Johnny Mack

Assistant

Winston Manjarrez

Driver

Rocco Mann

Driver

Brien Mcdonald

Grip

Elaine Mcghee

Key Costumer

Brandon Mcmillan

Animal Trainer

Dennis Mcneill

Color Timer

Daniel Messler

Accountant

Cheryl A Miller

Production Coordinator

Marcus Miller

Music

Linda Murphy

Boom Operator

Isis Mussenden

Costume Designer

Anthony J Nahar

Assistant Director

James Neal

Best Boy Grip

Donal Nelson

Sound

Ryan Nelson

Grip

Sam Nicholson

Visual Effects Supervisor

Marcie Olivi

Key Costumer

Jason Parrillo

Electrician

Houston Petty

Craft Service

Bill Pierson

Dolly Grip

Adam Pinkstaff

Transportation Captain

Max Pomerleau

Chief Lighting Technician

Doris Puhringer

On-Set Dresser

David Rhineer

Assistant Camera

Greg Rhineer

Camera Operator

Julia Rhoton

Office Production Assistant

Patrick Richmond

Set Production Assistant

Lisa Marie Robinson

On-Set Dresser

Kyle Rochlin

Foley Mixer

Christina Rollo

Assistant Production Coordinator

Nicole Rubio

Script Supervisor

Clyde Sherman

Stand-In

Clyde Sherman

Stand-In

Annie Shih

Sound

Jason Silber

Props

Keven Hale Simmons

Driver

Steve Sosner

Special Effects Foreman

Wayne Springfield

Construction Coordinator

D. Stevens

Photography

Russell Stimson

On-Set Dresser

Joanetta Stowers

Makeup Artist

Sheilah Sullivan

Production Accountant

Daniel Taplitz

Screenplay

John H Taylor

Best Boy Electric

Steven Ticknor

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Steven Ticknor

Sound Supervisor

Patrick Tonioli

Scenic Artist

David Torgerson

Driver

Lisa Tornell

Producer

Thomas Vandermillen

Assistant Camera

Kevin Wahrman

Foley Editor

Matt Warren

Other

Bonnie Weis

Production Supervisor

David Adam Weisberg

Adr Mixer

Frank Welker

Sound Effects

Handel Whitmore

Assistant Director

Kimberly Williams

Other

Chris Winter

Sound

Anthony Woods

Medic

Kurt Woolner

Other

Chris Wright

On-Set Dresser

Robin Wyatt

Office Production Assistant

Ray Yamagata

Assistant Art Director

Christopher D Yermanos

Scenic Artist

Robert L Young

Driver

Film Details

Also Known As
Breakin all the Rules, Breaking All the Rules, Breakup Handbook, The
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
Screen Gems
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Articles

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)


Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86.

Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967).

But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk).

Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn.

Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86. Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967). But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk). Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn. Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video October 12, 2004

Released in United States Spring May 14, 2004

Released in United States Spring May 14, 2004

Released in United States on Video October 12, 2004