The Servant in the House


1920

Film Details

Release Date
Jul 1920
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Triangle Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Film Booking Office, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Servant in the House by Charles Ryan Kennedy (New York, 23 Mar 1908).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
8-9 reels

Synopsis

Vicar William Smythe, formerly Bill Smith, is expecting a visit from his brother, the Bishop of Benares, and his rich brother-in-law, the Bishop of Lancaster, from whom he hopes to obtain funds to restore his antiquated church. Benares, however, enters the house in the guise of a servant, Manson, who bears a startling resemblance to the Christ. Robert, the third brother, is rude and uncivilized, but has sacrificed much for the education of his brothers and has received little but ingratitude from the vicar, who is now taking care of his daughter Mary. He is also bitter against the Church because the Bishop of Lancaster's neglect caused the death of his wife. After exposing the Bishop of Lancaster and turning him out of the house, Manson, through his generous spirit, effects a reconciliation among all the members of the family. Robert also becomes less antagonistic toward the Church, and the vicar volunteers to go down into the sewers and clean up the corruption beneath his church.

Film Details

Release Date
Jul 1920
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Triangle Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Film Booking Office, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Servant in the House by Charles Ryan Kennedy (New York, 23 Mar 1908).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
8-9 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Although this film was completed in 1918, there is no indication that it was released before 1920. It had its premiere at the Strand Theater in Washington, D.C. on July 20, 1920, but was incorrectly included in the AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 (F2.4910). The Film Booking Office played the picture as a road show in some areas, while also releasing it through independent exchanges with the option that they control the method of distribution. The Walgreene Film Corp. purchased the rights in October-November 1920, and one month later arranged to have its films distributed by The Federated Film Exchange of America, Inc., who released it to their exchanges in February 1921. Director Jack Conway was called Hugh Ryan Conway in some reviews.