The Howling


1h 30m 1981
The Howling

Brief Synopsis

After taking part in a risky police operation intended to trap a serial murderer, Karen White witnesses something horrifying enough to trigger selective amnesia. Consumed by a series of violent nightmares, she decides to admit herself to a recovery center, but the other occupants may not be what they seem.

Film Details

Also Known As
Howling, Hurlements
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1981

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

After taking part in a risky police operation intended to trap a serial murderer, Karen White witnesses something horrifying enough to trigger selective amnesia. Consumed by a series of violent nightmares, she decides to admit herself to a recovery center, but the other occupants may not be what they seem.

Crew

David Allen

Animator

Allen Alsobrook

Production Assistant

Susan Arnold

Casting

Rick Baker

Special Makeup Effects

Bruce Barbour

Stunts

Joe Beserra

Makeup

Margaret Beserra

Makeup

Doug Beswick

Mechanical Special Effects

Kent Beyda

Associate Editor

Daniel H. Blatt

Executive Producer

Donald P Borchers

Production Assistant

Rob Bottin

Associate Producer

Rob Bottin

Makeup

Gary Brandner

Source Material (From Novel)

Jack Buehler

Costumes

Robert A Burns

Art Director

Greg Cannom

Makeup

Frank Capra

Production Assistant

Chris Carney

Song

Mary Church

Art Assistant

Jack Conrad

Producer

Roger Creed

Stunt Coordinator

Ivo Cristante

Props

Jack Cummins

Assistant Director

Jack Cummins

Second Unit Director

Joe Dante

Editor

Jon Davison

Second Unit Director

Pino Donaggio

Music

Marneen Fields

Stunts

Joyce Fienhage

Song

Rick Fienhage

Song

Michael Finnell

Producer

Nancy G Fox

Wardrobe Supervisor

Roger George

Special Effects

Mark Goldblatt

Editor

Richard Hescox

Production

John Hora

Dp/Cinematographer

John Hora

Director Of Photography

Stephan Kertesz

Production Assistant

Ken King

Sound

Nancy Jane King

Assistant Director

Peter Kuran

Animator

Steven A Lane

Executive Producer

Steven Legler

Set Designer

Marshall Leib

Music Coordinator

Sherri Lubov

Production Assistant

Peter Manoogian

Location Manager

Natale Massara

Music

John Moio

Stunts

Laurel Moore

Photography

John Ott

Production Assistant

Stephen L Posey

Camera Operator

Jeanne Rosenberg

Script Supervisor

John Sayles

Screenplay

Jeff Shank

Visual Effects

Steve Shank

Visual Effects

Jack Smith

Location Manager

Jack Smith

Unit Manager

Michael Takacs

Technical Advisor

Mark Tarnawsky

Production Assistant

David C Thomas

Production Manager

Frank Ventrola

Production

Judith Weiner

Casting

Gigi Williams

Makeup

Gigi Williams

Hair

Terence H Winkless

Screenplay

Kurt Young

Key Grip

Film Details

Also Known As
Howling, Hurlements
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1981

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

The Howling


Three innovative entries in the werewolf horror vein saw their release in 1981: Wolfen, An American Werewolf in London and The Howling. While each brought something special to the genre, the latter united a multitude of talent for a film that was outlandish, gruesome and innovative in its use of cutting-edge practical effects. Penned with satirical wit by John Sayles and Terence H. Winkless from Gary Brandner’s serious source material, the film opens in Los Angeles, where news anchor Karen White (Dee Wallace) struggles to sleep after a near-murder at the hands of a stalker. Her psychiatrist suggests she and her husband (Christopher Stone) take a sojourn at the “Colony,” a secluded resort for rest and relaxation. It doesn’t take long for Karen to discover that the place is run by a group of werewolves (among them John Carradine and Slim Pickens), who shapeshift, hunt human flesh and fornicate by moonlight. Outnumbered but determined, Karen rushes to expose the Colony and to spread the word that werewolves walk among us, but will anyone believe her? When master effects artist Rick Baker left to work on John Landis’s American Werewolf in London, Dante handed the reins to Rob Bottin, who was more than up for the task and crafted one of horror cinema’s greatest on-screen transformations. Bottin would contribute his talent to John Carpenter’s The Thing in 1982. While The Howling saw a number of sequels with diminishing returns, this first entry launched director Joe Dante’s highly successful career. Note: Be on the look-out for B-movie producer Roger Corman outside a telephone booth in the film’s early moments.

by Thomas Davant

 The Howling

The Howling

Three innovative entries in the werewolf horror vein saw their release in 1981: Wolfen, An American Werewolf in London and The Howling. While each brought something special to the genre, the latter united a multitude of talent for a film that was outlandish, gruesome and innovative in its use of cutting-edge practical effects. Penned with satirical wit by John Sayles and Terence H. Winkless from Gary Brandner’s serious source material, the film opens in Los Angeles, where news anchor Karen White (Dee Wallace) struggles to sleep after a near-murder at the hands of a stalker. Her psychiatrist suggests she and her husband (Christopher Stone) take a sojourn at the “Colony,” a secluded resort for rest and relaxation. It doesn’t take long for Karen to discover that the place is run by a group of werewolves (among them John Carradine and Slim Pickens), who shapeshift, hunt human flesh and fornicate by moonlight. Outnumbered but determined, Karen rushes to expose the Colony and to spread the word that werewolves walk among us, but will anyone believe her? When master effects artist Rick Baker left to work on John Landis’s American Werewolf in London, Dante handed the reins to Rob Bottin, who was more than up for the task and crafted one of horror cinema’s greatest on-screen transformations. Bottin would contribute his talent to John Carpenter’s The Thing in 1982. While The Howling saw a number of sequels with diminishing returns, this first entry launched director Joe Dante’s highly successful career. Note: Be on the look-out for B-movie producer Roger Corman outside a telephone booth in the film’s early moments.by Thomas Davant

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)


Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72.

Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others.

Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981).

By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama.

His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role.

In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72. Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others. Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981). By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama. His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role. In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring April 10, 1981

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Spring April 10, 1981