Ferris Bueller's Day Off


1h 41m 1986

Brief Synopsis

A perpetual truant joins his friends for a day of adventure and self-discovery.

Film Details

Also Known As
Fira med Ferris, folle journée de Ferris Bueller
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Romance
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Jeff Lane
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Winnetha, Illinois, USA; Glencoe, Illinois, USA; Highland Park, Illinois, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Northbrook, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Synopsis

Ferris Bueller is a popular high school student living in an affluent Chicago suburb. After convincing his parents that he is truly sick, Ferris calls on his friend Cameron to join him for a day of hooky from school. Cameron agrees, reluctantly, because it means taking his father's prized classic 1961 red Ferrari 250 GT convertible. They pick up Ferris's girlfriend and head for adventure in downtown Chicago -- all the while trying to outsmart and outrun the dean of students who has become wise to Ferris' plan.

Crew

Paul Abascal

Hair

Greg Agalsoff

Boom Operator

Pamela Alch

Script Supervisor

Carl Aldana

Production

Jane Alderman

Casting

James Alexander

Sound

Terry Allen

Sound Effects Editor

Michael Amundson

Dga Trainee

James M Anderson

Camera Operator

Shelley Andreas

Casting

Feargal Andrews

Song

Arthur Baker

Music

Elinor Bardach

Assistant

The Beatles

Song Performer

Lon Bender

Sound Editor

Adam Bernardi

Apprentice

Bert Berns

Song

Boris Blank

Song

Marc Bolan

Song

Barbara Siebert Bolticoff

Costume Supervisor

Clay Boss

Stunts

Wilbert Bradley

Choreographer

Bill Brown

Post-Production Coordinator

Gretchen Brown

Location Assistant

Valerie Bulinski

Location Assistant

Michael Chinich

Executive Producer

Alf Clausen

Original Music

Terri Clemens

Office Assistant

Ken Collins

Assistant Director

John W Corso

Production Designer

Jim Cox

Sound Effects Editor

Tracy Cutts

Location Assistant

Jim M Davis

Props

Martin Degville

Song

Bennie Dobbins

Stunt Coordinator

Tom Elliott

Stunts

Jerrie Fowler

Assistant Editor

John Frazier

Special Effects Coordinator

Tak Fujimoto

Director Of Photography

Tak Fujimoto

Dp/Cinematographer

Milt Gabler

Song

Gilbert Gabriel

Song

Mauri Syd Gayton

Production Associate

Michael Germain

Makeup

Joe Gilbert

Sound Effects Editor

Stan Gilbert

Adr Editor

James Giovannetti

Assistant Director

David Gonzales

Assistant

Tarquin Gotch

Music Supervisor

Dennis Grisco

Other

Conrad W. Hall

Assistant Camera Operator

Ralph Hall

Props

John Hardy

Other

Scott E Hart

Animal Trainer

Billy Higgins

Other

J B Hirsch

Continuity

Paul Hirsch

Editor

Janet Hirshenson

Casting

Marcia Holley

Stunts

John Hudacek

Key Grip

John Hughes

Screenplay

John Hughes

Producer

Tom Jacobson

Producer

Tony James

Song

Jane Jenkins

Casting

Daniel S. Jimenez

Dolly Grip

Art Jones

Craft Service

Mick Jones

Song

Wingate Jones

Costumes

David Joyner

Song

Bert Kaempfert

Song

Frank Kearns

Song

Lisa Kearsley

Office Assistant

Randy Kelley

Sound Effects Editor

Tony Kerum

Caterer

George Kohut

Dp/Cinematographer

George Kohut

Director Of Photography

Peter Kuttner

Camera Assistant

Gary Ladinsky

Music

Nick Laird-clowes

Song

Jeff Lane

Cable Operator

Rick Lefevour

Stunts

Don Letts

Song

Stephen Lim

Assistant Director

Robert J Litt

Sound

Bill Lowman

Lighting Technician

Fran Lucci

Accounting Assistant

Louis Mann

Set Designer

Paul Mansfield

Song

Jack M Marino

Property Master

Johnny Marr

Song

Dan Marrow

Transportation Captain

Steve Maslow

Sound

Eddie Matthews

Stunts

Melton C Maxwell

Lighting Technician

Ronald E Maxwell

Transportation Co-Captain

Joe Mayer

Adr Editor

Eoin Mcevoy

Song

Phil Medley

Song

Dieter Meier

Song

Hugo Montenegro

Song

Laurel Moore

Photography

Don Nemitz

Original Music

Ira Newborn

Music

Charles J. Newirth

Location Manager

Wayne Newton

Song Performer

Dick Oakes

Gaffer

Kenny Ortega

Choreographer

Armand Paoletti

Transportation Captain

Jeff Passanante

Foreman

Ronald W Payne

Production Assistant

Bruce Pearson

Color Timer

Adam Peters

Song Performer

Adam Peters

Song

Jennifer Polito

Set Decorator

Greg Popp

Location Assistant

Jim Prior

Assistant Editor

Peck Prior

Assistant Editor

Cynthia Quan

Production Accountant

Tom Ramsey

Grip

Ed Reilly

Lighting Technician

Dan Rich

Sound Effects Editor

John Robie

Music

Tracy Rosenthal

Location Assistant

P Scott Sakamoto

Assistant Camera Operator

Silvio Scarano

Costume Supervisor

Arne L Schmidt

Unit Production Manager

Kurt Schwabach

Song

Wayne Sheehy

Song

Mark Simon

Camera Assistant

Wylie Stateman

Sound Editor

Tim Staubs

Grip

John Michael Stewart

Stunts

Richard Stone

Music Editor

Tom F Thomas

Transportation Coordinator

Larry Troutman

Song

Zapp Troutman

Song

Elliot Tyson

Sound

Marilyn Vance-straker

Costume Designer

Marilyn Vance-straker

Set Designer

Jane Vickerilla

Associate Producer

Edmund Villa

Property Master Assistant

David Wakeling

Song

Ramey Ward

Production Associate

Ben Watkins

Song Performer

Ben Watkins

Song

Jeanne Weber

Consultant

Hugo Weng

Sound Effects Editor

Kay H Whipple

Stunts

Neil Whitmore

Song

Linnea Wicklund

Assistant Director

John Williams

Song

Jerry Wills

Stunts

Bob Yerkes

Stunts

Jim Zenk

Photography

Videos

Movie Clip

Ferris Bueller's Day Off -- (Movie Clip) 1961 Ferrari Having enlisted Cameron (Alan Ruck), Ferris (Matthew Broderick) creates an emergency around his father's Ferrari, another famous scene from John Hughes' Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986.
Ferris Bueller's Day Off -- (Movie Clip) Twist And Shout tbdIn a pause in their adventure, Cameron (Alan Ruck) and Sloane (Mia Sara) are discussing Ferris (Matthew Broderick) when they discover he's usurped the parade with the famous Twist And Shout routine, in Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986.
Ferris Bueller's Day Off -- (Movie Clip) Open, I'm Fine Matthew Broderick in his heroic performance straight from the start, for parents (Cindy Pickett, Lyman Ward) and sister (Jennifer Grey) in the opening of John Hughes' Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986.
Ferris Bueller's Day Off -- (Movie Clip) It's Ed Rooney Principal Rooney (Jeffrey Jones) is alone but for the voice of the hero (Matthew Broderick) in just the beginning of a suburban surveillance run in John Hughes' Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986.
Ferris Bueller's Day Off -- (Movie Clip) If Ferris Dies... Kid sister Jeannie (Jennifer Grey) and other students marveling at her brother (Matthew Broderick) and his now-legendary illness, in an early scene from John Hughes' Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986.
Ferris Bueller's Day Off -- (Movie Clip) Bueller, Cameron Famous moment in which the Econ teacher (Ben Stein) takes roll, followed by absent Ferris' (Matthew Broderick) with his own introduction of comrade Cameron (Alan Ruck) in John Hughes' Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986.

Film Details

Also Known As
Fira med Ferris, folle journée de Ferris Bueller
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Romance
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Jeff Lane
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Winnetha, Illinois, USA; Glencoe, Illinois, USA; Highland Park, Illinois, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Northbrook, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Articles

Ferris Bueller's Day Off


Sometimes kids just need a day off. This may be something that adults in the workplace find hard to understand, but unless they do, the beauty of Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) will be forever lost on them. Brought to you by John Hughes, the man whose film credits read like the 'who's who' of the eighties, Ferris Bueller's Day Off is the story of a high school senior who takes an unscheduled day trip into Chicago with his girlfriend, his best pal, and, oh yeah, his best friend's dad's prized Ferrari convertible. Starring Matthew Broderick in the title role, Ferris Bueller's Day Off links into the fantasy we all had as teenagers: to be loved by everyone, but able to get away with anything.

John Hughes called this film his "love letter to the city" of Chicago. Set in fictional Shermer, Illinois - as are 16 of Hughes' films - he again shows his devotion to his hometown and state by placing the action in downtown Chicago and this oft-used suburb (Shermer is actually based on Hughes' real-life hometown, Northbrook). In the city, the kids hit the stock exchange, the Sears Tower, and the Art Institute among other places. The scene in the museum is one of the film's highlights: while sifting through shots of the artwork, an instrumental version of Steven Morrissey's "Please please please let me get what I what" plays, a song that was one of the veritable anthems of the 80s. And for a moment, you forget you are watching a teen flick . . . until of course, the next scene, when Ferris crashes a parade to sing "Twist and Shout." Look closely at the dancers in that sequence; they are actually doing the dance from "Thriller."

Broderick, who earned a 1987 Golden Globe nomination for his performance in Ferris Bueller's Day Off, is joined by a fine supporting cast. Alan Ruck plays hypochondriac friend Cameron, who is exactly as his father's vanity plate declares: NRVOUS. Ruck would also have a memorable role in Speed(1994), but is best known for the television series Spin City. Mia Sara plays his girlfriend Sloane; she appeared previously opposite Tom Cruise in Legend(1985). Jeffrey Jones plays the hapless and beleaguered "Edward R. Rooney, Dean of Students" who ineffectively tries all day to bust the hooky-playing teen. He would have made a good team with Ferris' seething-with-jealousy sister Jeanie, played by Jennifer Grey, but unfortunately their meeting ends up with a karate kick to the head, a bloodied nose, and Grey declaring she has "a scorching case of herpes." Jones does an about-turn performance from his Emperor Jones II role in Amadeus (1984), and Grey would go on to stardom the next year as Baby in Dirty Dancing (1987).

Broderick and Grey were dating and ultimately engaged just before the release of Ferris Bueller's Day Off, but while on holiday in Ireland were involved in a fatal car accident that killed two - they later split. Cindy Pickett and Lyman Ward played Ferris' parents, roles that they couldn't seem to get enough of - they were married after the film's release. Charlie Sheen, the spaced-out druggie in the police station, delivers the film's finest cameo. Sheen stayed awake for over 48 hours in order to achieve the wrecked look of his character. Method acting at its finest! Sheen would join up with Ruck later in Spin City.

As with most Hughes' films, there are hidden references to his other films. In Ferris Bueller's Day Off, look for the license plates; most are acronyms for his earlier works. Also, Ferris' bedroom wall features a Simple Minds poster, a band featured prominently in The Breakfast Club(1985) - Hughes personally decorated the room himself. There is even more John Hughes in the film than you might have guessed: it is his hand, not Cameron's, that turns the speakerphone on and off in Cameron's bedroom. And a picture of Hughes as depicted by his 6-year old son is on the Bueller's refrigerator!

Ferris Bueller's Day Off retains incredible popularity fifteen years after its release: several websites are devoted to it, with extensive information about movie-related merchandise, and it even inspired a band to call themselves Save Ferris. Critics ravaged the film upon release, calling it "a sad fiasco" and "airheads without a cause." But audiences embraced Ferris Bueller's Day Off, perhaps because they caught the message the critics missed: a joyride from reality. And when a snooty maitre d' declares dryly, "I weep for the future," fans of Ferris just laugh and say, "Leisure rules."

Producer: Michael Chinich, John Hughes, Tom Jacobson
Director/Screenplay: John Hughes
Cinematography: Tak Fujimoto
Music: Arthur Baker, Ira Newborn, John Robie, Yello
Editing: Paul Hirsch
Production Design: John W. Corso
Cast: Matthew Broderick (Ferris Bueller), Alan Ruck (Cameron Frye), Mia Sara (Sloane Peterson), Jeffrey Jones (Edward R. 'Ed' Rooney), Jennifer Grey (Jeanie Bueller), Cindy Pickett (Katie Bueller), Lyman Ward (Tom Bueller), Edie McClurg (Grace), Charlie Sheen (boy in police station), Ben Stein (Economics Teacher).
C-103m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Eleanor Quin

Ferris Bueller's Day Off

Ferris Bueller's Day Off

Sometimes kids just need a day off. This may be something that adults in the workplace find hard to understand, but unless they do, the beauty of Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) will be forever lost on them. Brought to you by John Hughes, the man whose film credits read like the 'who's who' of the eighties, Ferris Bueller's Day Off is the story of a high school senior who takes an unscheduled day trip into Chicago with his girlfriend, his best pal, and, oh yeah, his best friend's dad's prized Ferrari convertible. Starring Matthew Broderick in the title role, Ferris Bueller's Day Off links into the fantasy we all had as teenagers: to be loved by everyone, but able to get away with anything. John Hughes called this film his "love letter to the city" of Chicago. Set in fictional Shermer, Illinois - as are 16 of Hughes' films - he again shows his devotion to his hometown and state by placing the action in downtown Chicago and this oft-used suburb (Shermer is actually based on Hughes' real-life hometown, Northbrook). In the city, the kids hit the stock exchange, the Sears Tower, and the Art Institute among other places. The scene in the museum is one of the film's highlights: while sifting through shots of the artwork, an instrumental version of Steven Morrissey's "Please please please let me get what I what" plays, a song that was one of the veritable anthems of the 80s. And for a moment, you forget you are watching a teen flick . . . until of course, the next scene, when Ferris crashes a parade to sing "Twist and Shout." Look closely at the dancers in that sequence; they are actually doing the dance from "Thriller." Broderick, who earned a 1987 Golden Globe nomination for his performance in Ferris Bueller's Day Off, is joined by a fine supporting cast. Alan Ruck plays hypochondriac friend Cameron, who is exactly as his father's vanity plate declares: NRVOUS. Ruck would also have a memorable role in Speed(1994), but is best known for the television series Spin City. Mia Sara plays his girlfriend Sloane; she appeared previously opposite Tom Cruise in Legend(1985). Jeffrey Jones plays the hapless and beleaguered "Edward R. Rooney, Dean of Students" who ineffectively tries all day to bust the hooky-playing teen. He would have made a good team with Ferris' seething-with-jealousy sister Jeanie, played by Jennifer Grey, but unfortunately their meeting ends up with a karate kick to the head, a bloodied nose, and Grey declaring she has "a scorching case of herpes." Jones does an about-turn performance from his Emperor Jones II role in Amadeus (1984), and Grey would go on to stardom the next year as Baby in Dirty Dancing (1987). Broderick and Grey were dating and ultimately engaged just before the release of Ferris Bueller's Day Off, but while on holiday in Ireland were involved in a fatal car accident that killed two - they later split. Cindy Pickett and Lyman Ward played Ferris' parents, roles that they couldn't seem to get enough of - they were married after the film's release. Charlie Sheen, the spaced-out druggie in the police station, delivers the film's finest cameo. Sheen stayed awake for over 48 hours in order to achieve the wrecked look of his character. Method acting at its finest! Sheen would join up with Ruck later in Spin City. As with most Hughes' films, there are hidden references to his other films. In Ferris Bueller's Day Off, look for the license plates; most are acronyms for his earlier works. Also, Ferris' bedroom wall features a Simple Minds poster, a band featured prominently in The Breakfast Club(1985) - Hughes personally decorated the room himself. There is even more John Hughes in the film than you might have guessed: it is his hand, not Cameron's, that turns the speakerphone on and off in Cameron's bedroom. And a picture of Hughes as depicted by his 6-year old son is on the Bueller's refrigerator! Ferris Bueller's Day Off retains incredible popularity fifteen years after its release: several websites are devoted to it, with extensive information about movie-related merchandise, and it even inspired a band to call themselves Save Ferris. Critics ravaged the film upon release, calling it "a sad fiasco" and "airheads without a cause." But audiences embraced Ferris Bueller's Day Off, perhaps because they caught the message the critics missed: a joyride from reality. And when a snooty maitre d' declares dryly, "I weep for the future," fans of Ferris just laugh and say, "Leisure rules." Producer: Michael Chinich, John Hughes, Tom Jacobson Director/Screenplay: John Hughes Cinematography: Tak Fujimoto Music: Arthur Baker, Ira Newborn, John Robie, Yello Editing: Paul Hirsch Production Design: John W. Corso Cast: Matthew Broderick (Ferris Bueller), Alan Ruck (Cameron Frye), Mia Sara (Sloane Peterson), Jeffrey Jones (Edward R. 'Ed' Rooney), Jennifer Grey (Jeanie Bueller), Cindy Pickett (Katie Bueller), Lyman Ward (Tom Bueller), Edie McClurg (Grace), Charlie Sheen (boy in police station), Ben Stein (Economics Teacher). C-103m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 11, 1986

Released in United States on Video April 1987

Released in United States 2011

Completed shooting November 22, 1985.

Began shooting September 9, 1985.

Released in United States Summer June 11, 1986

Released in United States on Video April 1987

Released in United States 2011 (Community Screenings)