King Arthur


2h 6m 2004

Brief Synopsis

Historians have thought for centuries that King Arthur was only a myth, but the legend was based on a real hero, torn between his private ambitions and his public sense of duty. A reluctant leader, Arthur wishes only to leave Britain and return to the peace and stability of Rome. Before he can head

Film Details

Also Known As
Knights of the Roundtable, roi Arthur
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Action
Drama
Historical
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Dublin, Ireland; Europe

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Synopsis

Historians have thought for centuries that King Arthur was only a myth, but the legend was based on a real hero, torn between his private ambitions and his public sense of duty. A reluctant leader, Arthur wishes only to leave Britain and return to the peace and stability of Rome. Before he can head for Rome, one final mission leads him and his Knights of the Round Table, Lancelot, Galahad, Bors, Tristan, and Gawain to the conclusion that when Rome is gone, Britain needs a king--someone not only to defend against the current threat of invading Saxons, but to lead the isle into a new age. Under the guidance of Merlin, a former enemy, and the beautiful, courageous Guinevere by his side, Arthur will have to find the strength within himself to change the course of history.

Crew

Eugenio Alonso Yenes

Stunts

Justine Angus

Music Editor

Carlo Antonioni

Stunts

Bruce M Armstrong

Special Effects Technician

Beverly Austin

Prosthetics

Russ Bailey

Construction Coordinator

Norman Baillie

Prosthetics

Norman Baillie

Special Effects Technician

Vanessa Baker

Voice Casting

Garret Baldwin

Best Boy

Jonathan Barass

Special Effects Technician

Harry Barnes

Foley Editor

Ciaran Barry

Camera Operator

Leo Baumgartner

Camera

Stefan Baur

Camera Utility

Clive Beard

Special Effects Supervisor

Orin Beaton

Boom Operator

Ghillan Bedford

Assistant Sound Editor

Lon Bender

Supervising Sound Editor

Mona Benjamin

Costumes

Becky Bentham

Music Coordinator

Brian Best

Models

Carol Betera

Costumes

Yann Biquand

Assistant Art Director

Olivia Bloch-laine

Set Decorator

Marion Bochman

Tailor

David Bonneywell

Sculptor

Caimin Bourne

Special Effects Technician

Jean Bourne

Script Supervisor

Georges Branche

Stunts

Sarah Brewerton

Assistant Editor

David Brighton

Special Effects Assistant

Steven Browell

Assistant Sound Editor

Richard Brown

Special Effects Technician

Jerry Bruckheimer

Producer

Conrad Buff

Editor

Eileen Buggy

Hairdresser

Peter Burgis

Foley Artist

Ricky Butt

Foley Artist

Dara Byrne

Video

Martina Byrne

Makeup Artist

Pauline Walsh Byrne

Special Effects Technician

Bruce Cain

Stunts

Dan Camins

Assistant

John Campbell

Assistant

Fabrizio Caracciolo

Liaison

John F Carr

Electrician

Amanda Carroll

Special Effects

James Carroll

Special Effects

James Carroll

Special Effects Technician

Clare Carter

Costumes

Gordon Cave

Special Effects Technician

Simon Chase

Assistant Sound Editor

Nick Chopping

Stunts

Claudia Cimmino

Costumes

Niamh Clancy

Location Coordinator

Al Clay

Music Scoring Mixer

Eimear Clonan

Assistant Location Manager

Gillian Cody

Accounting Assistant

Maria Collins

Production Coordinator

Orla Collins

Accounting Assistant

Margaret Collis

Special Effects Assistant

Neil Collymore

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Ed Colyer

Foley Mixer

Fionn Comerford

Camera Operator

Joe Condren

Stunts

William Connelly

Electrician

Cliff Corbould

Special Effects Technician

Ian Corbould

Special Effects Technician

Neil Corbould

Prosthetics

Neil Corbould

Special Effects

Neil Corbould

Makeup Effects

Neil Corbould

Special Effects Coordinator

Paul Corbould

Special Effects Technician

Dee Corcoran

Hair Stylist

Colman Corish

Assistant Art Director

Maria Cork

Sculptor

Dougal Cousins

Location Manager

Neil Crawford

Tailor

David Croucher

Wardrobe Assistant

Kenneth Crough

Costume Supervisor

Ricardo Cruz

Stunts

Steve Cullane

Special Effects Supervisor

Noel Cullen

Rigging Gaffer

Elizabeth Dann

Wardrobe Assistant

Breda Davis

Tailor

Marc Davis

Special Effects Technician

Richard De'ath

Costumes

Kieran Dempsey

Best Boy

Conor Dennison

Assistant Art Director

Steve Dent

Stunt Coordinator

Andie Derrick

Foley Artist

Adrian Devane

Assistant

Judith Devlin

Wardrobe Assistant

Peter Devlin

Sound Mixer

Valter Di Francesco

Stunts

Jabin Dickins

Special Effects Technician

Brendan Donnison

Voice Casting

Ned Dowd

Executive Producer

Audrey Doyle

Makeup Artist

Sharon Doyle

Makeup Artist

Joshua Dragge

Assistant

John Dunne

Grip

Manex Efrem

Special Effects

Richard Egan

Grip

Jana Evans

Art Department

Iain Eyre

Dialogue Editor

Breege Fahy

Tailor

Sheila Fahy

Tailor

Kelvin Feeney

Tailor

John Fitzgerald

Sound Recordist

Martin Fitzpatrick

Special Effects Technician

James Flynn

Associate Producer

Ciaran Fogarty

Special Effects Technician

Richard Fordham

Assistant Sound Editor

Goeff Foster

Score Recording

David Franzoni

Screenplay

Mick Frawley

Electrician

Eanna Gallagher

Special Effects

Kirke Gardner

Unit Director

Andy Garner

Sculptor

Steve Gell

Costumes

Howard Gibbins

Unit Production Manager

Peter Gleaves

Adr Mixer

Nick Glennie-smith

Music

Nick Glennie-smith

Music Conductor

Tami R. Goldman

Post-Production Supervisor

Ingrid Goodwin

Assistant Location Manager

Roberta Gorski

Assistant

Matthew Gough

Sound Recordist

Rupert Gregson-williams

Music

Rupert Gregson-williams

Music Arranger

Rupert Gregson-williams

Music Conductor

Jen Griffin

Accounting Assistant

Isobel Griffiths

Music Contractor

Michelle Guish

Casting

Robert Hamilton

Video

John Lee Hancock

Screenplay (Uncredited)

John Lee Hancock

Other

James N Harrison

Sound Effects Editor

Alistair Hawkins

Assistant Sound Editor

Peter Hawkins

Sculptor

Nigel Heath

Foley Mixer

Stuart Heath

Special Effects Technician

Damien Heffernan

Electrician

Jonathan Hession

Photography

Mike Higham

Music Editor

Manus Hingerty

Location Manager

Peter Hodgson

Video

Mark Holmes

Set Costumer

Susan Holmes

Production Secretary

Eoin Holohan

Assistant Location Manager

Aaron Horn

Post-Production Assistant

Mark Howard

Special Effects Technician

Chris Howes

Animatronics

Caroline Hughes

Costumes

Slawomir Idziak

Director Of Photography

Slawomir Idziak

Dp/Cinematographer

Rob Inch

Stunts

Colin Jackman

Sculptor

Oliver Jarlett

Prosthetics

Heiko Joerke

Key Grip

Becky Johnson

Accounting Assistant

Bobbie Johnson

Production Accountant

Lionel Johnson

Assistant Editor

Lynn Johnston

Makeup Artist

Tom Johnston

Sound Recordist

Alex Joseph

Foley

Eddy Joseph

Supervising Sound Editor

Reza Karim

Sculptor

Jane Hope Kavanagh

Makeup Artist

Michael Kearns

Special Effects Technician

Dave Keiths

Grip

Sandra Kelly

Hairdresser

Colleen Kelsall

Assistant Costume Designer

Carole Ann Kenneally

Assistant Editor

Alistair King

Music Arranger

Alistair King

Music Coordinator

Raymond Kirk

Assistant Director

Helko Klunder

Grip

Linda Krauss

Assistant

Ronna Kress

Casting

Eliza Ladensohn

Casting Assistant

Hans Lehner

Grip

Stephane Lelievre

Stunts

Sue Lenny

Sound Effects Editor

Francis Lindsay

Sound Effects Editor

Sarah Love

Hair Stylist

Mitch Lowe

Boom Operator

Jimmy Lumsden

Special Effects

Danielle Maccaulay

Prosthetics

Lyndie Macintyre

Tailor

Jim Magdaleno

Storyboard Artist

John Maguire

Video

Niall Martin

Location Manager

John Marzano

Camera

Waldo Mason

Sculptor

James Mather

Sound Effects Editor

Phil Matthews

Wardrobe Assistant

Ron Mawbey

Wardrobe

Film Details

Also Known As
Knights of the Roundtable, roi Arthur
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Action
Drama
Historical
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Dublin, Ireland; Europe

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Articles

King Arthur - Now in Theatres


The legend of King Arthur and his round table has served as the basis for numerous screen versions, everything from a historical epic (Knights of the Round Table, 1953) to a musical version (Camelot, 1967) to a total farce (Monty Python and the Holy Grail, 1975) so why make another version? Well, director Antoine Fuqua (Training Day) and writer David Franzoni (Gladiator), the men behind the new film, King Arthur, have come up with their own spin on the events.

"It's a myth, and what Franzoni will argue and what the Arthur historians will argue is that [King Arthur] is probably more valid than any version, because it has an historical context," said Clive Owen who plays the title role, "So there are certain things that they have researched and that they do know about this time." The film is set in 550 A.D. at the great Hadrian's Wall, an 80 mile long, 15 foot high, 10 foot thick protective barrier built by the Romans. King Arthur has stayed behind after the Romans have fled to lead Sarmatian (or Russian) warriors into battle against the invading Saxons (or Germans). To give his warriors a chance, Arthur must ally with the Woad people, British guerrilla resistance fighters, led by their leader, Merlin, father of Guinevere, and long-time adversary to Arthur. Arthur's story is traditional territory for Franzoni, who wrote a similar story in Gladiator, where, as Franzoni classifies it, "the hero must fight for what's right, despite the odds and the inevitable outcome, is what's important." The difference between King Arthur and Gladiator is that Arthur wins 40 years of freedom for his people, and this is most likely the place in history where the Arthurian myth of Camelot began.

The love triangle between Lancelot, Arthur, and Guinevere found in the popular Lerner and Loewe creation, Camelot, is non-existent in Fuqua and Franzoni's adaptation. There is no time for love when there is so much fighting to be done. And the film's dark, violent visual style is most reminiscent of John Boorman's 1981 version of the myth, Excalibur. Both films convey a grittier, more chaotic reality that lacks the formal pageantry of the round table depicted in other films. But Clive Owen believes King Arthur stands alone, "I think it's great that we're giving people a unique version and not just recycling something they've seen before. I like that Antoine shows how Arthur's world was a really dangerous, scary place. That's what stuck with me when I saw Antoine's cut of our movie ¿ That's the world Arthur and his knights found themselves in. It's certainly not the prettified world of Camelot."

Even Guinevere is depicted in a new light; she's not a naive, hopeless romantic, but a warrior with a deadly command of the bow and arrow. Anyone who has seen the film can't fail to notice a scantily clad Guinevere (Keira Knightly) covered in only paint and some leather/S&M looking outfit - to attract younger audiences, no doubt. Antoine Fuqua disagrees, "The females were quite tough. They used to fight in the nude. And they used to paint themselves, with blue paint. The wode is a plant they used to use to paint their bodies blue (which is how the guerilla fighters got their name). And they fought naked to scare their enemies, to disrespect them, show 'em they had no fear. So that stuff is real."

However, the filmmakers' desire for accuracy in this portrayal of a medieval hero is not resonating with audiences or critics. Reviews and box office have been lukewarm for a film that boasts accomplished professionals behind and in front of the camera. Most reviews feel that the rants on freedom ring hollow. If audiences are looking for a tale with brutal medieval action then they are better off renting Braveheart. Or if it is knightly romance they are looking for then skip past Jerry Zucker's 1995 Arthurian film, First Knight, and revisit the Warner Brothers musical, Camelot (1968).

There is one sequence in King Arthur, however, that has captivated most audiences, and it is the battle scene filmed on ice. It was shot on a set constructed in a large frozen tank at Pinewood Studios in England that was filled with layers that would breakaway and swallow up battle-hardened knights and warriors. So was this scene historically accurate like the rest of the film proclaims to be? Fuqua admits that it's unlikely that a battle ever took place on ice, but the visuals and the challenge of such a thing made it more than worth bringing it to the screen. "It's a cool idea. [It took] a lot of planning," says Fuqua, "I did a whole pre-vis of it, because we were trying to figure out how to physically do it." King Arthur is currently showing at theatres everywhere but it may be fading fast, usurped by the popularity of breakout summer hits such as The Village and I, Robot.

by Tom Cappello
King Arthur - Now In Theatres

King Arthur - Now in Theatres

The legend of King Arthur and his round table has served as the basis for numerous screen versions, everything from a historical epic (Knights of the Round Table, 1953) to a musical version (Camelot, 1967) to a total farce (Monty Python and the Holy Grail, 1975) so why make another version? Well, director Antoine Fuqua (Training Day) and writer David Franzoni (Gladiator), the men behind the new film, King Arthur, have come up with their own spin on the events. "It's a myth, and what Franzoni will argue and what the Arthur historians will argue is that [King Arthur] is probably more valid than any version, because it has an historical context," said Clive Owen who plays the title role, "So there are certain things that they have researched and that they do know about this time." The film is set in 550 A.D. at the great Hadrian's Wall, an 80 mile long, 15 foot high, 10 foot thick protective barrier built by the Romans. King Arthur has stayed behind after the Romans have fled to lead Sarmatian (or Russian) warriors into battle against the invading Saxons (or Germans). To give his warriors a chance, Arthur must ally with the Woad people, British guerrilla resistance fighters, led by their leader, Merlin, father of Guinevere, and long-time adversary to Arthur. Arthur's story is traditional territory for Franzoni, who wrote a similar story in Gladiator, where, as Franzoni classifies it, "the hero must fight for what's right, despite the odds and the inevitable outcome, is what's important." The difference between King Arthur and Gladiator is that Arthur wins 40 years of freedom for his people, and this is most likely the place in history where the Arthurian myth of Camelot began. The love triangle between Lancelot, Arthur, and Guinevere found in the popular Lerner and Loewe creation, Camelot, is non-existent in Fuqua and Franzoni's adaptation. There is no time for love when there is so much fighting to be done. And the film's dark, violent visual style is most reminiscent of John Boorman's 1981 version of the myth, Excalibur. Both films convey a grittier, more chaotic reality that lacks the formal pageantry of the round table depicted in other films. But Clive Owen believes King Arthur stands alone, "I think it's great that we're giving people a unique version and not just recycling something they've seen before. I like that Antoine shows how Arthur's world was a really dangerous, scary place. That's what stuck with me when I saw Antoine's cut of our movie ¿ That's the world Arthur and his knights found themselves in. It's certainly not the prettified world of Camelot." Even Guinevere is depicted in a new light; she's not a naive, hopeless romantic, but a warrior with a deadly command of the bow and arrow. Anyone who has seen the film can't fail to notice a scantily clad Guinevere (Keira Knightly) covered in only paint and some leather/S&M looking outfit - to attract younger audiences, no doubt. Antoine Fuqua disagrees, "The females were quite tough. They used to fight in the nude. And they used to paint themselves, with blue paint. The wode is a plant they used to use to paint their bodies blue (which is how the guerilla fighters got their name). And they fought naked to scare their enemies, to disrespect them, show 'em they had no fear. So that stuff is real." However, the filmmakers' desire for accuracy in this portrayal of a medieval hero is not resonating with audiences or critics. Reviews and box office have been lukewarm for a film that boasts accomplished professionals behind and in front of the camera. Most reviews feel that the rants on freedom ring hollow. If audiences are looking for a tale with brutal medieval action then they are better off renting Braveheart. Or if it is knightly romance they are looking for then skip past Jerry Zucker's 1995 Arthurian film, First Knight, and revisit the Warner Brothers musical, Camelot (1968). There is one sequence in King Arthur, however, that has captivated most audiences, and it is the battle scene filmed on ice. It was shot on a set constructed in a large frozen tank at Pinewood Studios in England that was filled with layers that would breakaway and swallow up battle-hardened knights and warriors. So was this scene historically accurate like the rest of the film proclaims to be? Fuqua admits that it's unlikely that a battle ever took place on ice, but the visuals and the challenge of such a thing made it more than worth bringing it to the screen. "It's a cool idea. [It took] a lot of planning," says Fuqua, "I did a whole pre-vis of it, because we were trying to figure out how to physically do it." King Arthur is currently showing at theatres everywhere but it may be fading fast, usurped by the popularity of breakout summer hits such as The Village and I, Robot. by Tom Cappello

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer July 7, 2004

Released in United States on Video December 21, 2004

Released in United States Summer July 7, 2004

Released in United States on Video December 21, 2004