Gosford Park


2h 17m 2001

Brief Synopsis

It is November 1932. Gosford Park is the magnificent country estate to which Sir William McCordle and his wife, Lady Sylvia, gather relations and friends for a weekend shooting party. They have invited an eclectic group including a countess, a World War I hero, the British matinee idol Ivor Novello

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Period
Satire
Release Date
2001
Production Company
Kevin O'Shea
Distribution Company
USA Films
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m

Synopsis

It is November 1932. Gosford Park is the magnificent country estate to which Sir William McCordle and his wife, Lady Sylvia, gather relations and friends for a weekend shooting party. They have invited an eclectic group including a countess, a World War I hero, the British matinee idol Ivor Novello and an American film producer who makes Charlie Chan movies. As the guests assemble in the gilded drawing rooms above, their personal maids and valets swell the ranks of the house servants in the teeming kitchens and corridors below-stairs. But all is not as it seems: neither amongst the bejeweled guests lunching and dining at their enormous leisure, nor in the attic bedrooms and stark work stations where the servants labor for the comfort of their employers. In this luxurious setting, we're made witness to a series of events which bridge generations, class, sex, tragic personal history--and culminate in a murder... (or is it two murders?).

Crew

Hugo Adams

Foley

Mikael Allen

Other

Vicky Allen

Production Assistant

Robert Altman

Story By

Robert Altman

Song

Robert Altman

Producer

Robert Altman

Other

Stephen Altman

Production Designer

Julie Ankerson

Foley Artist

Jan Archibald

Hair Stylist

Foluso Aribigbola

Adr Editor

Wren Arthur

Production

Lawrence Ashmore

Music

Joshua Astrachan

Coproducer

Simon August

Location Assistant

Bob Balaban

Story By

Bob Balaban

Producer

Bob Balaban

Other

Elmer Balaban

Special Thanks To

David Balfour

Property Master

Jane Barclay

Executive Producer

Celia Barnett

Researcher

Patricia Barr

Other

John Bateman

Adr

Peter Beasley

Carpenter

Jenny Beavan

Costume Designer

Robin Bell

Photography

Nigel Bennett

Sound

Steve Boag

Titles And Opticals

Benjamin Bober

Boom Operator

Charles Bodycomb

Other

Richard Bolton

Music

Derek Boyes

Video Assist/Playback

Bary Brady

Special Thanks To

Stuart Brisdon

Special Effects Supervisor

Debbie Brodie

Other

Chris Brown

Construction

Daniel Brown

Driver

Nicholas Bucknall

Other

Martin Bullard

Titles And Opticals

Mark Bunce

Caterer

Anita Burger

Hairdresser

Peter Burgis

Foley Artist

Paul Carr

Adr Mixer

Richard Sion Carroll

Other

Caroline Chapman

Production Assistant

David Cheesman

Props

Dave Chorley

Caterer

May Chu

Assistant

Phil Churchfield

Caterer

Roy Clarke

Other

Fergus Clegg

Props Buyer

John Cochrane

Dialogue Editor

Sam Cohn

Special Thanks To

Keith Cole

Props

Abbi Collins

Stunt Man

Terry Collins

Driver

Ed Colyer

Adr

George Corrigan

Driver

Clive Crawley

Driver

Allan B Croucher

Other

Robert Cuddy

Electrician

Tony Cuomo

Security

Jason Curtis

Advisor

Tonia Davall

Music Contractor

Maxine Davidson

Special Thanks To

Garry Dawson

Props

Steve Dent

Animal Wrangler

Andie Derrick

Foley Artist

Sara Desmond

Assistant Director

Pam Dixon Mickelson

Special Thanks To

Abigail Doyle

Song

Abigail Doyle

Song Performer

Abigail Doyle

Music

Patrick Doyle

Music

Clive Drinkall

Production

Michael Driscoll

Production

Lowell Dubrinsky

Post-Production Assistant

Rod Duggan

Other

Andrew Dunn

Director Of Photography

John Ensby

Special Thanks To

Avy Eschenasy

Special Thanks To

Penny Eyles

Script Supervisor

Rebecca Farrant

Other

Julian Fellowes

Associate Producer

Julian Fellowes

Screenplay

John Fewell

Foley Artist

Carlos Fidel

Assistant Director

Joan Field

Stand-In

Darren Flindall

Other

Raymond Flindall

Other

Gerry Floyd

Driver

James Foster

Art Director

Colin Fox

Other

John Frankish

Art Director

Jane Frazer

Coproducer

Stephen Frears

Special Thanks To

Len Furssedonn

Driver

Pat Garrett

Other

Rob Garvey

Special Thanks To

John Geary

Other

Makr Geeson

Props

Donna Gigliotti

Special Thanks To

Peter Glossop

Sound

Emily Grant

Assistant Editor

Matt Gray

Assistant Art Director

Margaret Graysmark

Construction

Tony Graysmark

Construction Manager

Terry Green

Security

Clifford Grey

Song

Pat Grosswendt

Gaffer

Mark Gudgin

Sound

Lena Guilbert Ford

Song

Robert Gurney

Other

Sacha Guttenstein

Post-Production Assistant

Mark Haddenham

Special Effects

Howard Halsall

Dialogue Editor

Rob Hanson

Driver

Sharon Harel-cohen

Executive Producer

Alan Harrison

Other

Steve Harrow

Post-Production

Nina Hartstone

Dialogue Editor

Christopher Hassall

Song

Phil Haughton

Driver

Sarah Hauldren

Art Director

Eddie Hession

Other

Robert Hill

Props

Sid Hinson

Other

Vince Holden

Finance Manager

Kevin Hopkins

Other

Frank Howe

Art Assistant

Simon Hudnott

Driver

Simon Hughes

Other

Andrew Hunt

Wardrobe Assistant

Peter Hunt

Color

Malcolm Huse

Other

Arthur Inch

Other

Lisa Inman

Other

Robert Ireland

Adr Editor

Hortense Izac

Special Thanks To

Deborah Jarvis

Makeup Artist

Joseph Jayawardena

Unit Manager

Sallie Jaye

Makeup

Bryce Johnstone

Carpenter

Robert Jones

Executive Producer

Anya Keith

Assistant Production Coordinator

Anna Kot

Assistant Costume Designer

Mark Lafbery

Foley Mixer

Bradley Larner

Other

Hannah Leader

Executive Producer

Ray Lee

Props Buyer

Stephen Lee

Video

David Levy

Producer

Violet Liddle

Other

Lee Lighting Ltd

Lighting

John F Lyons

Assistant Editor

Stuart Mackay

Other

Will Macneil

Assistant Editor

Roy Martin

Other

Sharon Martin

Makeup Artist

Steve Mayer

Assistant Sound Editor

Yann Mccullough

Music

Pat Mcenallay

Special Thanks To

Ian Mcfadyen

Other

Liam Mcgill

Best Boy

John Mcgoldrick

Carpenter

Bob Mcgovern

Driver

Hugh Mckenzie

Carpenter

John Mcmeekin

Driver

Ronald Meeks

Other

Ion Meetsovitis

Music

Nneka Meka

Other

Gary Messer

Stand-In

Stephen Miles

Wardrobe Assistant

Zoie Miller

Accounting Assistant

Nigel Mills

Sound Editor

Shaun Mills

Boom Operator

Simon Minshall

Other

John Mister

Other

Edward Moore

Song

Lew Morgan

Security

Ruth Mott

Other

James Muir

Other

Keith Muir

Production

Neil Munro

Electrician

Julian Murray

Accounting Assistant

Ian Neail

Special Thanks To

Joseph Newman

Carpenter

Maria Newsham

Art Department

Ruth Nicol

Medic

Gary Nolan

Electrician

Sophie Norinder

Wardrobe Assistant

Christopher Northam

Song Performer

Ivor Novello

Song

Robin O'donohue

Rerecording

Eamonn O'keeffe

Other

Kevin O'shea

Production Insurance

David Oliver

Stand-In

Paul Olliver

Special Thanks To

Nigel Palmer

Special Thanks To

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Period
Satire
Release Date
2001
Production Company
Kevin O'Shea
Distribution Company
USA Films
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m

Award Wins

Best Original Screenplay

2001

Best Original Screenplay

2002
Julian Fellowes

Award Nominations

Set Decoration

2001

Best Costume Design

2001

Best Director

2001
Robert Altman

Best Picture

2001

Best Supporting Actress

2001
Helen Mirren

Best Supporting Actress

2001
Maggie Smith

Articles

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)


Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69.

Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district.

The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future.

Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney.

For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972).

Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979).

By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990).

Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69. Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district. The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future. Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney. For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972). Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979). By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990). Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 2001 award for Best Acting Ensemble from the Broadcast Film Critics Association.

Winner of the 2001 award for Best Ensemble from the Online Film Critics Society (OFCS).

Winner of the 2001 award for Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen from the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Winner of the award for Director of the Year at the 2001 American Film Institute (AFI) Awards. Nominated for a further three awards, including Editor of the Year, Production Designer of the Year and Composer of the Year.

Winner of three 2001 awards, including Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress (Helen Mirren), from the National Society of Film Critics.

Winner of three 2001 awards, including Best Director, Best Supporting Actress (Helen Mirren) and Best Screenplay, from the New York Film Critics Circle.

Winner of two 2001 Golden Satellite Awards, including Best Supporting Actress - Musical or Comedy (Maggie Smith) and Best Ensemble Cast Performance, from the International Press Academy.

Winner of two 2001 Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards, including Best Supporting Actress (Helen Mirren) and Best Ensemble Cast.

Released in United States Winter December 26, 2001

Expanded Release in United States January 4, 2002

Expanded Release in United States January 11, 2002

Released in United States on Video June 25, 2002

Released in United States November 2001

Shown at London Film Festival (Opening Night/ Gala Films) November 7-22, 2001.

Jude Law was previously attached to star.

Screenwriting debut for Julian Fellowes.

Began shooting March 19, 2001.

Completed shooting May 2001.

Released in United States Winter December 26, 2001

Expanded Release in United States January 4, 2002

Expanded Release in United States January 11, 2002

Released in United States on Video June 25, 2002

Released in United States November 2001 (Shown at London Film Festival (Opening Night/ Gala Films) November 7-22, 2001.)

Nominated for the 2001 Eddie Award for Best Edited Feature - Comedy or Musical, from the American Cinema Editors (ACE).