Spider


1h 38m 2002

Brief Synopsis

Spider, a deeply disturbed boy, believes his father has brutally murdered his mother and replaced her with a prostitute. He is diagnosed a schizophrenic and is sent to a mental institution, where he remains for twenty years. While institutionalized, he falls in love with the wife of one of the docto

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Thriller
Release Date
2002
Production Company
Davis Films; Even Tone Editorial; Film Effects Inc.; Grosvenor Park; Metropolitan Films; Pangea Media Group; Pangea Media Group; Pangea Media Group
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Classics; Cts; Fandango; Golden Scene; Les Films De L'Elysee; Lionsgate; Lionsgate U.K.; Media Suits; Metropolitan Filmexport; Monopole Pathe Films Ag; Scanbox Entertainment; Sony Pictures Classics; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Triangelfilm; United International Pictures; Videocine; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

Spider, a deeply disturbed boy, believes his father has brutally murdered his mother and replaced her with a prostitute. He is diagnosed a schizophrenic and is sent to a mental institution, where he remains for twenty years. While institutionalized, he falls in love with the wife of one of the doctors. Upon his release, she follows him to London's rough East End where he tries to return to his former life as an artist. Gradually his fragile grip on reality begins to crumble.

Crew

Nicole Achim

Production Controller

Ian Aegis

Location Manager (Uk Unit)

Maria Aitken

Associate Producer

Christine Allsop

Makeup Artist (Uk Unit)

Catherine Bailey

Producer

Vanessa Baker

Adr Voice Casting

Jane Barclay

Executive Producer

Anna Beben

Production Coordinator

Deirdre Bowen

Casting (Canada)

David Broder

Location Manager (Uk Unit)

Natalie Bronfman

Costume Coordinator

Warren Brown

Creative Director (Cuppa Coffee Animation, Inc.)

Sanjay Burman

Associate Producer

Penny Charter

Assistant Director

Christian Cooke

Rerecording Mixer

Jennifer Cote

Assistant Director

David Cronenberg

Producer

Denise Cronenberg

Costume Designer

Tony Currie

Dialogue Editor

Sara Desmond

Assistant Director (Uk Unit)

Brendan Donnison

Adr Voice Casting

Jennifer Dunnington

Music Editor

Stephan Dupuis

Chief Makeup Artist

David Evans

Supervising Sound Editor

Robert Farr

Adr Recordist

Andrea Finch

Hair Stylist (Uk Unit)

Andrea Finch

Makeup Artist (Uk Unit)

Charles Finch

Executive Producer

Simon Franks

Executive Producer

Walter Gasparovic

Assistant Director

Glen Gauthier

Production Sound Mixer

Sara Giles

Associate Producer (Freewheel International)

Annie Gilhooly

Production Coordinator (Uk Unit)

Brenda Gilles

Costume Supervisor

Nick Girvan

Unit Manager (Uk Unit)

Jeff Grace

Music Coordinator

Matt Gray

Draughtsman (Uk Unit)

Mary-lou Green-benvenuti

Hair Stylist

Arv Greywal

Art Director

Wayne Griffin

Supervising Sound Editor

Samuel Hadida

Producer

Victor Hadida

Executive Producer

Pippa Hall

Casting (Boy Spider)

Sharon Harel-cohen

Executive Producer

Hector Herrera

Creative Director (Cuppa Coffee Animation, Inc.)

Benjamin Howard

Assistant Director (Uk Unit)

Kelly Howard-garde

Production Manager (Uk Unit)

Zygi Kamasa

Executive Producer

Martin Katz

Executive Producer

Inge Klaudi

Makeup Artist

Goro Koyama

Foley Artist

Greg Laporta

Music Programming

Hannah Leader

Executive Producer

Tony Lilley

Hairdresser (Uk Unit)

Fiona Macpherson

Special Effects Shop Coordinator

Andy Malcolm

Foley Artist

Blanche Mcdermaid

Script Supervisor

Patrick Mcgrath

Source Material (From Novel)

Patrick Mcgrath

Screenplay (Adaptation)

Lynda Mckenzie

Post-Production Supervisor

Ron Mellegers

Foley Mixer

John Midgley

Production Sound Mixer (Uk Unit)

Marina Morris

Set Decorator (Uk Unit)

Vanessa Munro

Wardrobe Mistress (Uk Unit)

Ian Nelmes

Key Scenic Artist

Alan Pinniger

Location Manager (Uk Unit)

Barbara Pullan

Location Manager (Uk Unit)

Lucy Richardson

Art Director (Uk Unit)

Luc Roeg

Executive Producer

Andrew Sanders

Production Designer

Ronald Sanders

Editor

Rob Sanderson

Key Special Effects Technician

Alan Senior

Special Effects Supervisor (Uk Unit)

Adam Shaheen

Opening Titles Executive Producer (Cuppa Coffe Animation, Inc.)

Michael Sherwin

Mould Maker

Howard Shore

Original Music

Howard Shore

Music Conductor

Howard Shore

Music

Suzanne Smith

Casting

Marilyn Stonehouse

Unit Production Manager

Peter Suschitzky

Director Of Photography

Peter Suschitzky

Dp/Cinematographer

Orest Sushko

Rerecording Mixer

Guy Tannahill

Line Producer

Guy Tannahill

Line Producer

Clive Thomasson

Set Decorator (Uk Unit)

Remo Tozzi

Draughtsman (Uk Unit)

Danny White

Special Effects Coordinator

Don White

Foley Mixer

Anna Worley

Script Supervisor (Uk Unit)

John Wriggle

Music Coordinator

Stephanie Yarymowich

2nd Scenic Artist

David Yonson

Adr Recordist

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Thriller
Release Date
2002
Production Company
Davis Films; Even Tone Editorial; Film Effects Inc.; Grosvenor Park; Metropolitan Films; Pangea Media Group; Pangea Media Group; Pangea Media Group
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Classics; Cts; Fandango; Golden Scene; Les Films De L'Elysee; Lionsgate; Lionsgate U.K.; Media Suits; Metropolitan Filmexport; Monopole Pathe Films Ag; Scanbox Entertainment; Sony Pictures Classics; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Triangelfilm; United International Pictures; Videocine; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

An Interview with David Cronenberg - DAVID CRONENBERG DISCUSSES HIS LATEST FILM - SPIDER


"I often wonder what it's like to be a cell in a body."

"The appeal of horror is beyond politics...it deals with things much more primordial - those old standbys, death and separation."

"I would never censor myself." - David Cronenberg

This interview with David Cronenberg was conducted on Thursday, February 20, 2003, at the Hotel Monaco in Denver, Colorado, and was made possible by Landmark Theaters and Moviehabit.com. All quotes outside the interview that are attributed to Cronenberg are taken from Chris Rodley's 1992 edition of CRONENBERG ON CRONENBERG.

When he was in his 20's, Canadian filmmaker David Cronenberg staked out his claim with a variety of student films and made-for-tv efforts. His early work showed unique thematic relations that he would explore in ways often described as cerebral, primordial, methodical, and even inscrutable. Starting with TRANSFER (1966), FROM THE DRAIN (1967), STEREO (1969), and CRIMES OF THE FUTURE (1970), the doctors, surgeries, institutions, viruses, and psychic (not to mention physiological) turmoil were all in their embryonic stage and just beginning to blossom. When he was in his 30's, Cronenberg really let loose with shockers that were uniquely visceral or bizarre, but also bold and ingenius, such as SHIVERS (1975), RABID (1977), THE BROOD (1979), SCANNERS (1981), VIDEODROME and THE DEAD ZONE (both 1983). These films alone gave Cronenberg a well-earned place in the pantheon of great horror film directors. Then, in his 40's, Cronenberg had a huge hit with his remake of THE FLY (1986) and from there launched himself into the arthouse crowd with DEAD RINGERS (1988), NAKED LUNCH (1991), and M BUTTERFLY (1993). In his 50's, he caused a scandal in Cannes with CRASH (1996) and later put his unique spin on the dangers (to use a catch-all word, here meant to encompass perception, politics, and more) behind virtual reality-video games in EXISTENZ (1999). Now, just a few weeks shy of his 60th birthday, Cronenberg returns to the screen with his latest film, SPIDER, based on the gothic (Cronenberg would say "neo-Gothic") novel by Patrick McGrath (pronounced McGraw) and starring Ralph (pronounced Rafe) Fiennes as the eponymous and schizophrenic character who is trying to make sense of all the intermingling webs of his memory. Although still in its initial stage of exhibition, SPIDER has already begun to net Cronenberg some of the best critical reviews he has received since THE FLY. While it's tempting to chart the relationship between these two films in title alone, and tragedy and deterioration can be found at the core of both, they are also worlds apart in important ways that go beyond aesthetics and approach - and a testimony to Cronenberg's wide range and diverse palette.

LITERATURE & FILM

"There are books you read because they're a diversion, and there are books you read when you're in spiritual trouble. They are soul food; they really do balm the soul. I want my movies to do that, get to the soul." (Cronenberg)

(Interviewer) Pablo Kjolseth: To use the preceding quote as a launching pad to discuss your latest film, does SPIDER fall into this category, and if so why?

Cronenberg: I'm really looking for a very personal connection between me and the audience. My relationship with the audience is very collaborative. It's not like Hitchcock, who liked to think of himself as a puppet master and his audience as marionettes who he could pull their strings to make them laugh and twitch and cry. Whether he was assessing himself accurately is another question. I don't even aspire to that. I'm asking my audience to have a similar experience to what I've had, but from their perspective. Any audience is going to bring their own culture, education, awareness of movies and everything else to a movie, so I don't try to predict their reactions or manipulate those reactions. I'm really telling myself a story and inviting them to listen in. SPIDER has sadness, tragedy, and even humor. So, yes, I think it does completely fit that bill from that long-ago interview.

I take the art of cinema seriously and I think it should do what art can do, and I would separate it from pure entertainment alone. It's meant to do more than that. Cinema has incredible and vast potential. What Hollywood normally does is it runs in a very narrow groove. It's very powerful, and we have great affection for Hollywood films, but they don't remotely tap the great potential of what cinema as an art form can do. It's left to independent filmmakers to explore that vast potential.

Kjolseth: How did the book by Patrick McGrath find its way into your hands, and how did his involvement with the screenplay come about?

Cronenberg: I was sent the script by someone in Toronto. At that point I didn't know anything about Patrick McGrath. I hadn't read his novels. The first thing of his that I read was his script for SPIDER, and I thought it was terrific. I got very excited about the possibility of me doing it, especially since it came with Ralph Fiennes attached - he'd been involved with the project for about four years before I got the script and he was very interested in playing that role. After I read the script I started to read Patrick's other novels, starting with SPIDER, and I found a whole, rich, and very interesting world considered by some to be gothic, or neo-gothic, as I think Patrick is revitalizing the classic gothic genre. SPIDER, in a strange way is perhaps his least gothic novel. Gothic would mean, huge, lonely mansions perched on the edge of cliffs with thunderstorms and people in capes sweeping around with a lot of great emotion and tragic density. SPIDER is a more modern novel than that.

Kjolseth: In the book, Spider's inner voice, his narration, is very eloquent and active, and at complete odds with how he expresses himself to the outside world. Tell me about the decision to strip away the first-person narrative used in the book.

Cronenberg: I think in the book you don't really know how he connects with the outside world. Certainly when he's speaking to himself in the form of the journal, and the book SPIDER is his journal, he's a beautiful writer. He writes very fluently and beautifully with wonderful metaphors and great structure because Patrick McGrath is a wonderful writer. That works as a literary conceit; that this man who is basically suffering from schizophrenia, and his personality is disintegrating, and he is having great trouble distinguishing interior from exterior voices, and is hallucinating quite mightily - that he could at the same time write such a clear, self-aware account of himself, as a literary conceit, it works...and you want it to work. But as soon as you apply that to the Spider who was created for the screen, also by Patrick, you can see that they are two different people. The Spider in the movie is very inarticulate, not very self-aware, and he can barely speak. When you had a voice-over supposedly representing his inner thoughts that were very beautifully literary and rounded and balanced, you don't believe it. You simply don't believe that this man could speak that way or have those thoughts. Immediately, I said to Patrick: I think this is you not being able to let go of the novel - but you've gone so far in creating a new, cinematic Spider that we have to go with that one and forget the novel version of Spider. So I took away the voice-over, and I still have him writing in a journal but I asked Ralph Fiennes to develop a kind of hieroglyphics, or cuneiform, or runic script, that Spider can read but we can't read because he's very paranoid. He doesn't want other people to read what he's writing because, in a sense, he feels that he's taking evidence from a crime that has been committed, and he's very possessive of that and very worried that someone else will read it and so that's why he writes in this strange script in the movie.

Kjolseth: Before you tackled them, many people would have described NAKED LUNCH and CRASH as impossible literary works to translate to the screen and yet you did it. Have you ever read a book that even you thought was un-filmable?

Cronenberg: I actually don't even think about that when I read. I don't read books for their movie potential at all. And I do read a lot. And I absolutely don't read books thinking about moviemaking. It's just not in my nature to do that. Basically, my party line is that all books are unfilmable. They are totally unfilmable unless you shoot the pages. The two media are so completely different that you are only giving the illusion of filming a novel but, really, you can't. So a complete re-invention is required. You sort of make up a version of it and then call it by the same name and that's your movie.

Kjolseth: Your father was a bibliophile. You grew up in a house with corridors that you cite as literally composed of books. Do you think such love affairs with literature are waning with each generation, and if so, what kind of impact do you think this will have on how future generations think?

Cronenberg: Literature is a very different animal from, let's say, the movies because it is based on the structure of language. Without language you don't have self-awareness, you don't have, self-consciousness. So much of what we are, as humans, that differentiates us from any other animal that we know, and probably from anything else in the universe, is the self-awareness, the higher consciousness, that we can have, which is so hugely language based. Movies, of course, use language, but there's a level of abstraction in a book, a novel, that is much more extreme than in film. You cannot photograph an abstract concept. If you want to generate abstract concepts from your film, that is to say thoughts and connections, you have to do it by photographing actual physical objects and, of course you can invent them with computer imagery, but it amounts to the same thing. So it's a very different process that happens in your nervous system and your brain when you watch a movie, even one that has a lot of dialogue, than what happens when you read a book. They're very, very different. I don't think that we will ever let go of literature. I don't think it's possible, because (literature) does something that's very unique and is not supplanted at all by the cinema. The two things are very different.

The popularity of reading novels might wax and wane, and certainly there are a lot of very depressed novelists right now who feel that their art form has already hit its peak, and now hit its nadir within their lifetime. Most of them are still writing, but they feel that their audience has gotten smaller and smaller. On the other hand, reading has not decreased at all. In fact, the computer has really enhanced a strange form of letter-writing through instant-messaging and email, and I'm not saying that the art of letter-writing has been revived because the kind of writing that people do in email is not like the kind of writing that they did when writing a beautiful letter was considered a mark of culture. When, if you couldn't write an elegant and beautiful letter, you were not considered a cultured person. Well, we don't have that now. But reading is still as important as it ever was and has been enhanced in a very strange way by the computer. The fortunes of the novel might well wax and wane - but reading is essential to thought.

An Interview With David Cronenberg - David Cronenberg Discusses His Latest Film - Spider

An Interview with David Cronenberg - DAVID CRONENBERG DISCUSSES HIS LATEST FILM - SPIDER

"I often wonder what it's like to be a cell in a body." "The appeal of horror is beyond politics...it deals with things much more primordial - those old standbys, death and separation." "I would never censor myself." - David Cronenberg This interview with David Cronenberg was conducted on Thursday, February 20, 2003, at the Hotel Monaco in Denver, Colorado, and was made possible by Landmark Theaters and Moviehabit.com. All quotes outside the interview that are attributed to Cronenberg are taken from Chris Rodley's 1992 edition of CRONENBERG ON CRONENBERG. When he was in his 20's, Canadian filmmaker David Cronenberg staked out his claim with a variety of student films and made-for-tv efforts. His early work showed unique thematic relations that he would explore in ways often described as cerebral, primordial, methodical, and even inscrutable. Starting with TRANSFER (1966), FROM THE DRAIN (1967), STEREO (1969), and CRIMES OF THE FUTURE (1970), the doctors, surgeries, institutions, viruses, and psychic (not to mention physiological) turmoil were all in their embryonic stage and just beginning to blossom. When he was in his 30's, Cronenberg really let loose with shockers that were uniquely visceral or bizarre, but also bold and ingenius, such as SHIVERS (1975), RABID (1977), THE BROOD (1979), SCANNERS (1981), VIDEODROME and THE DEAD ZONE (both 1983). These films alone gave Cronenberg a well-earned place in the pantheon of great horror film directors. Then, in his 40's, Cronenberg had a huge hit with his remake of THE FLY (1986) and from there launched himself into the arthouse crowd with DEAD RINGERS (1988), NAKED LUNCH (1991), and M BUTTERFLY (1993). In his 50's, he caused a scandal in Cannes with CRASH (1996) and later put his unique spin on the dangers (to use a catch-all word, here meant to encompass perception, politics, and more) behind virtual reality-video games in EXISTENZ (1999). Now, just a few weeks shy of his 60th birthday, Cronenberg returns to the screen with his latest film, SPIDER, based on the gothic (Cronenberg would say "neo-Gothic") novel by Patrick McGrath (pronounced McGraw) and starring Ralph (pronounced Rafe) Fiennes as the eponymous and schizophrenic character who is trying to make sense of all the intermingling webs of his memory. Although still in its initial stage of exhibition, SPIDER has already begun to net Cronenberg some of the best critical reviews he has received since THE FLY. While it's tempting to chart the relationship between these two films in title alone, and tragedy and deterioration can be found at the core of both, they are also worlds apart in important ways that go beyond aesthetics and approach - and a testimony to Cronenberg's wide range and diverse palette. LITERATURE & FILM "There are books you read because they're a diversion, and there are books you read when you're in spiritual trouble. They are soul food; they really do balm the soul. I want my movies to do that, get to the soul." (Cronenberg) (Interviewer) Pablo Kjolseth: To use the preceding quote as a launching pad to discuss your latest film, does SPIDER fall into this category, and if so why? Cronenberg: I'm really looking for a very personal connection between me and the audience. My relationship with the audience is very collaborative. It's not like Hitchcock, who liked to think of himself as a puppet master and his audience as marionettes who he could pull their strings to make them laugh and twitch and cry. Whether he was assessing himself accurately is another question. I don't even aspire to that. I'm asking my audience to have a similar experience to what I've had, but from their perspective. Any audience is going to bring their own culture, education, awareness of movies and everything else to a movie, so I don't try to predict their reactions or manipulate those reactions. I'm really telling myself a story and inviting them to listen in. SPIDER has sadness, tragedy, and even humor. So, yes, I think it does completely fit that bill from that long-ago interview. I take the art of cinema seriously and I think it should do what art can do, and I would separate it from pure entertainment alone. It's meant to do more than that. Cinema has incredible and vast potential. What Hollywood normally does is it runs in a very narrow groove. It's very powerful, and we have great affection for Hollywood films, but they don't remotely tap the great potential of what cinema as an art form can do. It's left to independent filmmakers to explore that vast potential. Kjolseth: How did the book by Patrick McGrath find its way into your hands, and how did his involvement with the screenplay come about? Cronenberg: I was sent the script by someone in Toronto. At that point I didn't know anything about Patrick McGrath. I hadn't read his novels. The first thing of his that I read was his script for SPIDER, and I thought it was terrific. I got very excited about the possibility of me doing it, especially since it came with Ralph Fiennes attached - he'd been involved with the project for about four years before I got the script and he was very interested in playing that role. After I read the script I started to read Patrick's other novels, starting with SPIDER, and I found a whole, rich, and very interesting world considered by some to be gothic, or neo-gothic, as I think Patrick is revitalizing the classic gothic genre. SPIDER, in a strange way is perhaps his least gothic novel. Gothic would mean, huge, lonely mansions perched on the edge of cliffs with thunderstorms and people in capes sweeping around with a lot of great emotion and tragic density. SPIDER is a more modern novel than that. Kjolseth: In the book, Spider's inner voice, his narration, is very eloquent and active, and at complete odds with how he expresses himself to the outside world. Tell me about the decision to strip away the first-person narrative used in the book. Cronenberg: I think in the book you don't really know how he connects with the outside world. Certainly when he's speaking to himself in the form of the journal, and the book SPIDER is his journal, he's a beautiful writer. He writes very fluently and beautifully with wonderful metaphors and great structure because Patrick McGrath is a wonderful writer. That works as a literary conceit; that this man who is basically suffering from schizophrenia, and his personality is disintegrating, and he is having great trouble distinguishing interior from exterior voices, and is hallucinating quite mightily - that he could at the same time write such a clear, self-aware account of himself, as a literary conceit, it works...and you want it to work. But as soon as you apply that to the Spider who was created for the screen, also by Patrick, you can see that they are two different people. The Spider in the movie is very inarticulate, not very self-aware, and he can barely speak. When you had a voice-over supposedly representing his inner thoughts that were very beautifully literary and rounded and balanced, you don't believe it. You simply don't believe that this man could speak that way or have those thoughts. Immediately, I said to Patrick: I think this is you not being able to let go of the novel - but you've gone so far in creating a new, cinematic Spider that we have to go with that one and forget the novel version of Spider. So I took away the voice-over, and I still have him writing in a journal but I asked Ralph Fiennes to develop a kind of hieroglyphics, or cuneiform, or runic script, that Spider can read but we can't read because he's very paranoid. He doesn't want other people to read what he's writing because, in a sense, he feels that he's taking evidence from a crime that has been committed, and he's very possessive of that and very worried that someone else will read it and so that's why he writes in this strange script in the movie. Kjolseth: Before you tackled them, many people would have described NAKED LUNCH and CRASH as impossible literary works to translate to the screen and yet you did it. Have you ever read a book that even you thought was un-filmable? Cronenberg: I actually don't even think about that when I read. I don't read books for their movie potential at all. And I do read a lot. And I absolutely don't read books thinking about moviemaking. It's just not in my nature to do that. Basically, my party line is that all books are unfilmable. They are totally unfilmable unless you shoot the pages. The two media are so completely different that you are only giving the illusion of filming a novel but, really, you can't. So a complete re-invention is required. You sort of make up a version of it and then call it by the same name and that's your movie. Kjolseth: Your father was a bibliophile. You grew up in a house with corridors that you cite as literally composed of books. Do you think such love affairs with literature are waning with each generation, and if so, what kind of impact do you think this will have on how future generations think? Cronenberg: Literature is a very different animal from, let's say, the movies because it is based on the structure of language. Without language you don't have self-awareness, you don't have, self-consciousness. So much of what we are, as humans, that differentiates us from any other animal that we know, and probably from anything else in the universe, is the self-awareness, the higher consciousness, that we can have, which is so hugely language based. Movies, of course, use language, but there's a level of abstraction in a book, a novel, that is much more extreme than in film. You cannot photograph an abstract concept. If you want to generate abstract concepts from your film, that is to say thoughts and connections, you have to do it by photographing actual physical objects and, of course you can invent them with computer imagery, but it amounts to the same thing. So it's a very different process that happens in your nervous system and your brain when you watch a movie, even one that has a lot of dialogue, than what happens when you read a book. They're very, very different. I don't think that we will ever let go of literature. I don't think it's possible, because (literature) does something that's very unique and is not supplanted at all by the cinema. The two things are very different. The popularity of reading novels might wax and wane, and certainly there are a lot of very depressed novelists right now who feel that their art form has already hit its peak, and now hit its nadir within their lifetime. Most of them are still writing, but they feel that their audience has gotten smaller and smaller. On the other hand, reading has not decreased at all. In fact, the computer has really enhanced a strange form of letter-writing through instant-messaging and email, and I'm not saying that the art of letter-writing has been revived because the kind of writing that people do in email is not like the kind of writing that they did when writing a beautiful letter was considered a mark of culture. When, if you couldn't write an elegant and beautiful letter, you were not considered a cultured person. Well, we don't have that now. But reading is still as important as it ever was and has been enhanced in a very strange way by the computer. The fortunes of the novel might well wax and wane - but reading is essential to thought.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 2002 award for Best British Actor (Ralph Fiennes) by the London Film Critics Circle.

Nominated for the 2002 award for Best British Actress (Miranda Richardson) by the London Film Critics Circle.

Winner of the 2002 award for Best Supporting Actress (Miranda Richardson) by the San Francisco Film Critics Circle.

Winner of the Best Director Award at the 2002 Toronto International Film Festival.

Winner of two 2003 Toronto Film Critics Association (TFCA) awards including: Best Canadian Film and Best Supporting Actress (Miranda Richardson).

Released in United States 2002

Released in United States February 28, 2003

Released in United States January 2003

Released in United States May 2002

Released in United States November 2002

Released in United States on Video July 29, 2003

Released in United States September 2002

Released in United States Winter December 20, 2002

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (in competition) May 15-26, 2002.

Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 9-20, 2003.

Shown at Telluride Film Festival August 30 - September 2, 2002.

Shown at Toronto International Film Festival September 5-14, 2002.

Released in United States 2002 (Shown at Telluride Film Festival August 30 - September 2, 2002.)

Released in United States January 2003 (Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 9-20, 2003.)

Released in United States February 28, 2003 (New York City and Los Angeles)

Released in United States May 2002 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (in competition) May 15-26, 2002.)

Released in United States on Video July 29, 2003

Released in United States September 2002 (Shown at Toronto International Film Festival September 5-14, 2002.)

Released in United States November 2002 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Special Screening) November 7-17, 2002.)

Released in United States Winter December 20, 2002