Thursday


1h 25m 1998

Brief Synopsis

Casey has given up drug dealing for a suburban idyll in Houston, a job as an architect and a new wife. They are even planning to a adopt a child. But Casey's past arrives on the doorstep in the shape of Nick, an old business partner. Nick leaves a briefcase full of heroin, which Casey impetuously fl

Film Details

Also Known As
C'est pas mon jour!
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Comedy
Crime
Thriller
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Gramercy Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Synopsis

Casey has given up drug dealing for a suburban idyll in Houston, a job as an architect and a new wife. They are even planning to a adopt a child. But Casey's past arrives on the doorstep in the shape of Nick, an old business partner. Nick leaves a briefcase full of heroin, which Casey impetuously flushes. There follows a surreal procession of callers to his house, all looking for Nick, the drugs, or the money for them. A Rasta hitman wants to off Casey, an old flame wants his body, and he must still deal with the psychologist from the adoption agency.

Crew

Steve Adelson

Steadicam Operator

Joseph Anaya

Post-Production Supervisor

Ryan Arndt

Special Effects

Benjamin Ball

Art Director

Douglas D Berkeley

Set Designer

Wayne H Bilson

Other

Mark Bridges

Costume Designer

Glen Chin

Adr

Roberta Chow

Adr

Tim Clawson

Unit Production Manager

Tim Clawson

Executive Producer

Susan Doepner-senac

Wardrobe Supervisor

Mike Draghi

Rerecording

Alex R Felix

Special Effects

Leigh French

Voice Casting

John E Gray

Special Effects Coordinator

Greta Grigorian

Set Decorator

Heidi Grotsky

Makeup

Cameron Hamza

Sound Mixer

Harry Harris

Dialogue Editor

Steve Hasson

Location Manager

Sue Jennings

Production Supervisor

Mary Kay Jensen

Wardrobe

Terry W King

Special Effects

Phil Kovats

Sound Effects Editor

Kurt Kuenne

Sound Effects Editor

Cassandra Kulukundis

Casting Associate

Joost Langeveld

Song

Johann Langlie

Song

Denis Lenoir

Director Of Photography

Denis Lenoir

Other

Gary Maurer

Other

Mark Mcnair

Line Producer

Angus Mcnaughton

Song

Chris Anthony Miller

Production Designer

Eric Mofford

Assistant Director

Hilary Momberger

Script Supervisor

Pamela Phillips

Makeup

James Pinckney

Song

Frankie Pine

Music Supervisor

Glenn Plummer

Song Performer

Glenn Plummer

Song

John Post

Foley Artist

Alan Poul

Producer

Bashar A Rabbu

Sound Effects Editor

Bashar A Rabbu

Adr Editor

B L Richmond

Stunt Coordinator

Rachel Rosenman

Post-Production Coordinator

Giorgio Scala

Camera Operator

Peter Schink

Editor

Frank Serafine

Foley Recordist

Frank Serafine

Sound Supervisor

Frank Serafine

Sound Designer

Frank Serafine

Rerecording

Frank Serafine

Adr

Linda Shamest Rosman

Post-Production Supervisor

Christine Sheaks

Casting

Christine Sheaks

Coproducer

Kirsten Smith

Screenplay

Christopher M Taylor

Sound Mixer

Paul Trejo

Editor

Arnold Turner

Adr

Ronald Veto

Steadicam Operator

Jen Wall

Production Coordinator

Skip Woods

Coproducer

Skip Woods

Screenplay

Patrick Yew

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
C'est pas mon jour!
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Comedy
Crime
Thriller
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Gramercy Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Articles

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole
Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Co-winner of the 1999 Artios Award for Feature Film - Independent by the Casting Society of America (CSA).

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States Fall November 13, 1998

Released in United States on Video December 15, 1998

Released in United States September 1998

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 26 - March 6, 1998.

Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Contemporary World Cinema) September 10-19, 1998.

Feature directorial debut for Skip Woods.

Began shooting July 7, 1997.

Completed shooting August 7, 1997.

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 26 - March 6, 1998.)

Released in United States September 1998 (Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Contemporary World Cinema) September 10-19, 1998.)

Released in United States Fall November 13, 1998

Released in United States on Video December 15, 1998