Office Space


1h 29m 1999
Office Space

Brief Synopsis

Peter Gibbons is an office drone like many others, and he hates his routine life. One day, the occupational therapist who was hypnotising him keels over dead, leaving him with a permanantly altered attitude. Asked to come in on weekends, he responds by coming in only when he wants to, playing games

Film Details

Also Known As
35 heures, c'est déjà trop, Trabajo basura
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Satire
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Austin, Texas, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m

Synopsis

Peter Gibbons is an office drone like many others, and he hates his routine life. One day, the occupational therapist who was hypnotising him keels over dead, leaving him with a permanantly altered attitude. Asked to come in on weekends, he responds by coming in only when he wants to, playing games on his computer and moving furniture to give himself a better view. But instead of firing him, the company takes this oddness as evidence of his managerial potential.

Crew

R L Altman Iii

Song

Rob Anderson

Assistant

Jeff M Andrus

Grip

Marc Andrus

Key Grip

Abby Antweil

Electrician

Louis Armstrong

Song Performer

Heidi Arnold

Music

Laura Auldridge

Casting Associate

Michael Axinn

Assistant Sound Editor

Steve Balbi

Song

Delayne Barnett

Accountant

Christopher Barrick

Other

Christopher Barron

Audio

Lasse Bavngaard

Song

Michael Bayer

On-Set Dresser

Rasmus Berg

Song

Kevin Berve

Props

Jeff Bilger

Set Production Assistant

Randy Bilski

Props

Arthur Blum

Dolly Grip

Megan Bobeda Curry

Assistant Location Manager

Jo Edna Boldin

Casting

Leroy Bonner

Song

Damon Botsford

Post-Production Assistant

Felicity Bowring

Makeup Artist

Karen A Brocco

Assistant Sound Editor

Aaron Brock

Apprentice

Stacy Brownrigg

Sound Mixer

Chris Buchinsky

Storyboard Artist

Kira Burns

Extras Casting Assistant

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

John V Burson

Construction Coordinator

Bob Calvert

Special Effects

Christina Campbell

Accounting Assistant

Anne Carr

Medic

Michael Cearley

Set Production Assistant

Jan Clark

Production Accountant

Bonnie Clevering

Hair Stylist

David Allan Coe

Song

Brian Cross

Props

April Crump

On-Set Dresser

Jose F Cruz

Electrician

Carla Curry

Set Decorator

Marc Dabrusin

On-Set Dresser

Jesper Dahl

Song

Allen Dameron

Music Conductor

Kim M Davis

Location Manager

Travis Dean

Props

Steven Dearth

Special Effects

Shanti Delsarte

Assistant Production Coordinator

Ellie Dendahl

Assistant Location Manager

W Dennis

Song

Luther Dixon

Song

Bill Dunagan

Props

Matt Dunstone

Office Assistant

Steve Eckelman

Set Production Assistant

Tony Eckert

Foley Mixer

Melinda Eshelman

Costume Designer

Gregory Faucett

Transportation Captain

Paul V Ferrazzi

Assistant Camera Operator

Bob Field

Gaffer

Jennifer Finch

Song

Christina Fong

Assistant Director

Melissa Forney

Hair

J Forte

Song

Stephen Foster

Song Performer

Alix Friedberg

Assistant Costume Designer

John C Frizzell

Music

Kory Funk

Electrician

Kimberly Sue Furlong

Set Costumer

Fred Gabrielli

Caterer

Yvonne Gabrielli

Craft Service

S Remi Gibbs

Song

Stanford S. Gilbert

Property Master

Stanley Ginsel

Sound

T Glover

Song

Austin Gorg

Graphic Artist

Don Gross

Props

Herbie Hancock

Song Performer

Herbie Hancock

Song

Kelley A Hankins

Other

Philip Hardage

Assistant Director

Joseph D Hendrix

Props

Joseph Hendrix

Other

C Hernandez

Song

Robert Hicks

Grip

Mildred Hill

Song

Patty Hill

Song

Gary Hoey

Song

Gary Hoey

Song Performer

Kalen Hoyle

Makeup

Emily Pedraza Hudson

Other

Lee Hunsaker

Set Costumer

Roy Huth

On-Set Dresser

Denise Jackson

Location Manager

Simon James

Music Contractor

Janice Janecek

Costume Supervisor

Julie Janes

Hair Assistant

Jessica Jarrett

Assistant

Joseph Johnson

Song

Thomas Johnson

Other

Marshall Jones

Song

Quincy Jones

Song

Kim Jorgensen

Apprentice

Mike Judge

Other

Mike Judge

Screenplay

Cherie King

Assistant Editor

Robert King

Stunt Coordinator

Andrew Kinney

Original Music

Ed Kirkeby

Song

Nancy Klopper

Casting

Key Kolb Iii

Best Boy Grip

Nicholas Kvaran

Song

Bruce Lacey

Adr Editor

Eric A. Lewy

Assistant Editor

Micha Liberman

Other

Paul Lombardi

Special Effects Coordinator

James R Lowder

Transportation Coordinator

Jeri Lowe

Other

David Lucarelli

Adr

Sarah Lum

Assistant

Buz Maloy

Grip

Christine Marino

Assistant

Kurt Matlin

Song

Edward T. Mcavoy

Production Designer

Nicki Mccain

Accounting Assistant

Kate Mccarley

Location Manager

Dennis Mcneill

Color Timer

Frank 'pepe' Merel

Foley Recordist

Marcel Meyer

Location Assistant

Ralph Middlebrooks

Song

S. Mark Mims

Electrician

Myra A Minchew

Editor

Robert Morgenroth

Video

Walter Morrison Jr.

Song

James W Murray

Assistant Director

Tom Myers

Rerecording

Richard Nance

Grip

Norman B Napier

Song

Louis Natale

Song

Udi Nedivi

Unit Production Manager

Rob Nelson

Video

Andrew Noland

Song

Eric Norris

Stunts

Jonathan Null

Dialogue Editor

E Larry Oatfield

Sound Effects Editor

John Okuribido

Song

Warren Paeff

Associate Editor

Charles Papert

Camera Operator

Michael Pappas

Craft Service

Dolly Parton

Song

Andrew S Payer

Set Production Assistant

Kyle Peak

Set Production Assistant

Elizabeth Peters

Avid Editor

Rick Peterson

Special Effects

Melinda Pharr

Other

Marvin Pierce

Song

Don Pike

Stunts

Gary Pike

Stunts

Adele Plauche

Art Director

Perez Prado

Song Performer

James Prince

Song

Brandon Proctor

Other

Gabe Proctor

Video Assist/Playback

Robert Puff

Music

Mark Quinn

Caterer

Daniel Rappaport

Producer

Van Redin

Photography

Junior Reid

Song Performer

Virle Reid

Props

Salaam Remi

Song

David Rennie

Editor

Charlene Richards

Adr Mixer

Jerry Riddles

Props

Guy Riedel

Executive Producer

Gary A. Rizzo

Rerecording

Steve Romanko

Other

Felix Rosales

Other

Michael Rotenberg

Producer

Wally Rowell

Electrician

Reed Ruddy

Other

Gabe Rutman

Song Performer

Hillary Sachs

Casting Associate

Evelyn Colleen Saro

On-Set Dresser

Brooke Satrazemis

Other

Steve Sawhill

On-Set Dresser

Scarface

Song

Larry Schalit

Adr Editor

Jurgen Scharpf

Sound Mixer

Charles Seale

Other

Dee Selby

Audio

Michael Semanick

Rerecording

Beth Sepko

Extras Agent/Coordinator

M K Shaw

Accountant

Robert Shoup

Sound Editor

Moises Simons

Song

Debra Dotts Sladek

Assistant Camera Operator

Al Smith

Song

David Allen Smith

Boom Operator

K D Smith

Production Coordinator

Film Details

Also Known As
35 heures, c'est déjà trop, Trabajo basura
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Satire
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Austin, Texas, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m

Articles

Office Space: Special Edition With Flair


Less than a year before Mike Judge's priceless workplace comedy Office Space came out in theaters, Twentieth Century Fox had nurtured a slow-starting, undeniably funny movie into becoming a hit and a universally acknowledged comedy classic. That was Peter and Bobby Farrelly's There's Something About Mary.

But Fox just couldn't manage that again with Judge's movie, set at the fictional, downsizing software firm, Initech. After getting a quick heave-ho from theaters in its initial appearance, Office Space still managed to gain a following on video and cable. Yet Fox seemed awfully slow to realize this. The movie's original no-frills widescreen DVD went out of print in 2003, replaced by a no-frills fullscreen disc. Fox evidently didn't notice that Office Space had spawned a cottage industry of unofficial products—from Initech coffee mugs and sticky notes to T-shirts highlighting the movie's many memorable moments—and Swingline even introduced a red stapler because of the demand created by this movie, after its art department had a Swingline painted red and "cast" it as the most prized possession of office drone Milton, the star of the Judge animated shorts that preceded it.

Fox has finally heeded the popularity of Office Space and released the new Office Space: Special Edition with Flair! DVD. Of course, the movie remains as funny as ever. I'm sure a company somewhere has strung up a banner in its office that arrogantly implores its employees to ask "Is this good for the company?" before every task, as Initech does here. And I'm sure there are middle-managers in industrial parks who believe organizing a "Hawaiian Shirt Day" is being the best pal in the world to their underlings, as persistently annoying Bill Lumbergh (Gary Cole) does. But Judge makes such efforts in corporate relations totally laughable. His cartoon hero, played onscreen by Stephen Root, returns as a sort of Greek chorus and avenging angel rolled into one, having his desk repeatedly moved, getting squeezed out of a piece of cake during an office birthday party, losing that red stapler to a grabby boss and figuring heavily in the climax. But Judge puts more Everyman-style cubicle warriors at the center of his story, including software grunts Samir (Ajay Naidu), Michael Bolton (David Herman) and especially Peter (Ron Livingston), whose sudden and liberating clarity following a hypnosis session puts him at odds with his job as a cog in the corporate machine. With Peter deciding to strike back against his dehumanizing bosses as he pursues a relationship with a chain-restaurant waitress (Jennifer Aniston) and helps his two buddies fend off downsizing, Office Space is as sharp as ever.

But what of the extras in this long-awaited special edition? Pretty disappointing. Most glaring is the absence of Judge's four Milton animated shorts. Instead, the major extras here are eight deleted scenes (which run about six minutes in total) and the new half-hour Office Space: Out of the Office featurette. Although for some reason the deleted scenes are offered only in "Video Assist" footage and not on film, what's here for extras is decent, but flimsy. Many of the extra scenes overlap with ideas in the finished film, so it's easy to see why they were expendable. The most interesting cut tidbits are two small things excised from the last few minutes of the movie that would have turned its resolution a little darker. They wouldn't have necessarily improved things, but it's interesting to see that Judge gave himself this darker option.

The featurette gathers most of the principals from the movie (with Aniston seen only in archival on-set interviews). Judge always has interesting and amusing things to say, and right at the start he reveals that something that sold him on doing the movie was Cole coming in to read for the role of annoying boss Lumbergh and nailing the passive-aggressive voice Judge had given the character in the animated shorts. Similarly, Livingston, Naidu and Herman each speaks to his character's struggle for self-respect. Livingston sums it up best when he says "Fight Club would be the movie that Peter Gibbons, in his head, thinks he's in." But the featurette is choppily-structured, divided into sections that sometimes run minutes, sometimes only seconds. It's as if the documentary wants to bust beyond the half-hour mark, and another 10 minutes might have beefed up those lean sections.

The Office Space: Special Edition with Flair! DVD has been priced as a budget disc, which I suppose is some acknowledgement that it is not as generous as most deluxe discs. If you're looking for more than what it offers, you might want to check out its limited edition Gift Set, which runs about $10 more and also includes a red stapler and other souvenirs of the movie, but which is available only from one particular big box retailer.

For more information about Office Space: Special Edition, visit Fox Home Entertainment.

by Paul Sherman
Office Space: Special Edition With Flair

Office Space: Special Edition With Flair

Less than a year before Mike Judge's priceless workplace comedy Office Space came out in theaters, Twentieth Century Fox had nurtured a slow-starting, undeniably funny movie into becoming a hit and a universally acknowledged comedy classic. That was Peter and Bobby Farrelly's There's Something About Mary. But Fox just couldn't manage that again with Judge's movie, set at the fictional, downsizing software firm, Initech. After getting a quick heave-ho from theaters in its initial appearance, Office Space still managed to gain a following on video and cable. Yet Fox seemed awfully slow to realize this. The movie's original no-frills widescreen DVD went out of print in 2003, replaced by a no-frills fullscreen disc. Fox evidently didn't notice that Office Space had spawned a cottage industry of unofficial products—from Initech coffee mugs and sticky notes to T-shirts highlighting the movie's many memorable moments—and Swingline even introduced a red stapler because of the demand created by this movie, after its art department had a Swingline painted red and "cast" it as the most prized possession of office drone Milton, the star of the Judge animated shorts that preceded it. Fox has finally heeded the popularity of Office Space and released the new Office Space: Special Edition with Flair! DVD. Of course, the movie remains as funny as ever. I'm sure a company somewhere has strung up a banner in its office that arrogantly implores its employees to ask "Is this good for the company?" before every task, as Initech does here. And I'm sure there are middle-managers in industrial parks who believe organizing a "Hawaiian Shirt Day" is being the best pal in the world to their underlings, as persistently annoying Bill Lumbergh (Gary Cole) does. But Judge makes such efforts in corporate relations totally laughable. His cartoon hero, played onscreen by Stephen Root, returns as a sort of Greek chorus and avenging angel rolled into one, having his desk repeatedly moved, getting squeezed out of a piece of cake during an office birthday party, losing that red stapler to a grabby boss and figuring heavily in the climax. But Judge puts more Everyman-style cubicle warriors at the center of his story, including software grunts Samir (Ajay Naidu), Michael Bolton (David Herman) and especially Peter (Ron Livingston), whose sudden and liberating clarity following a hypnosis session puts him at odds with his job as a cog in the corporate machine. With Peter deciding to strike back against his dehumanizing bosses as he pursues a relationship with a chain-restaurant waitress (Jennifer Aniston) and helps his two buddies fend off downsizing, Office Space is as sharp as ever. But what of the extras in this long-awaited special edition? Pretty disappointing. Most glaring is the absence of Judge's four Milton animated shorts. Instead, the major extras here are eight deleted scenes (which run about six minutes in total) and the new half-hour Office Space: Out of the Office featurette. Although for some reason the deleted scenes are offered only in "Video Assist" footage and not on film, what's here for extras is decent, but flimsy. Many of the extra scenes overlap with ideas in the finished film, so it's easy to see why they were expendable. The most interesting cut tidbits are two small things excised from the last few minutes of the movie that would have turned its resolution a little darker. They wouldn't have necessarily improved things, but it's interesting to see that Judge gave himself this darker option. The featurette gathers most of the principals from the movie (with Aniston seen only in archival on-set interviews). Judge always has interesting and amusing things to say, and right at the start he reveals that something that sold him on doing the movie was Cole coming in to read for the role of annoying boss Lumbergh and nailing the passive-aggressive voice Judge had given the character in the animated shorts. Similarly, Livingston, Naidu and Herman each speaks to his character's struggle for self-respect. Livingston sums it up best when he says "Fight Club would be the movie that Peter Gibbons, in his head, thinks he's in." But the featurette is choppily-structured, divided into sections that sometimes run minutes, sometimes only seconds. It's as if the documentary wants to bust beyond the half-hour mark, and another 10 minutes might have beefed up those lean sections. The Office Space: Special Edition with Flair! DVD has been priced as a budget disc, which I suppose is some acknowledgement that it is not as generous as most deluxe discs. If you're looking for more than what it offers, you might want to check out its limited edition Gift Set, which runs about $10 more and also includes a red stapler and other souvenirs of the movie, but which is available only from one particular big box retailer. For more information about Office Space: Special Edition, visit Fox Home Entertainment. by Paul Sherman

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 19, 1999

Released in United States on Video August 31, 1999

Released in United States March 2009

Shown at South by Southwest Film Festival (Special Screenings) March 13-21, 2009.

Based on a series of animated short films created by Mike Judge.

Live-action feature film debut for animator Mike Judge ("Beavis and Butt-head," "King of the Hill").

Began shooting May 4, 1998.

Released in United States Winter February 19, 1999

Released in United States on Video August 31, 1999

Released in United States March 2009 (Shown at South by Southwest Film Festival (Special Screenings) March 13-21, 2009.)

Completed shooting June 29, 1998.