Jakob the Liar


1h 54m 1999

Brief Synopsis

In Nazi-occupied Poland, Poor Jewish cafe owner Jakob overhears a confidential radio news bulletin signalling Soviet military advances against the Germans. It's the first bit of news the depressed ghetto has received in five years and to keep spirits alive, Jakob conjures up fictitious news bulleti

Film Details

Also Known As
Jakob le menteur
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Period
War
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Cinema Research Corporation; Columbia Pictures; Deluxe Entertainment Services Group; Sony Pictures Imageworks, Inc.
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing; Buena Vista International; Cts; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Sony Pictures Releasing; Sony Pictures Releasing International; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Poland; Budapest, Hungary

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Synopsis

In Nazi-occupied Poland, Poor Jewish cafe owner Jakob overhears a confidential radio news bulletin signalling Soviet military advances against the Germans. It's the first bit of news the depressed ghetto has received in five years and to keep spirits alive, Jakob conjures up fictitious news bulletins about Allied gains against the Nazis. When a renewed sense of optimism and humor has rejuvenated the ghetto, it is not long before the Gestapo is in search of the leader of this new resistance.

Crew

Luciana Arrighi

Production Designer

Sandor Balo

Production Manager

Kerry Barden

Casting

Miroslaw Bartosik

Special Effects (Poland Crew)

Jurek Becker

Book As Source Material ("Jakob Der Lugner")

John Bell

Additional Orchestration

Hector Berlioz

Song ("Rakoczy March")

Andrzej Besztak

Production Coordinator (Poland Crew)

Jay Boekelheide

Sound Effects Editor

Johannes Brahms

Music ("Gestille Sehnsucht Op 91 Nr I")

Bane Branimir

Art Director

Marek Brodzki

Assistant Director (Poland Crew)

Lew Brown

Song ("Beer Barrell Polka (Roll Out The Barrell)")

Caspar Campbell

Assistant Director

Kim B Christensen

Sound Design

Gabriella Csoma

Production Coordinator

Zsolt Csutak

Casting

Didier Decoin

Screenwriter

Patrick Dodd

Supervising Sound Editor

Mark Egerton

Assistant Director

Malcolm Fife

Foley

Steve Fontano

Foley Mixer

Nick Gillott

Co-Producer

Will Glare

Song Performer ("Beer Barrell Polka (Roll Out The Barrell)")

Steven Haft

Producer

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Ron Hutchinson

Screenwriter

Simone Ireland

Casting

Kati Jakots

Makeup Supervisor

Peter Kassovitz

Screenwriter

Risa Kes

Casting

Balazs Kovacs

Assistant Director

Grazyna Kozlowska

Location Manager (Poland Crew)

Louis Lane

Song Conductor ("Rakoczy March")

Tibor Lazar

Art Director

Liz Legum

Assistant Director

Julie Linder

Adr

Tamas Maros

Unit Manager

Jennie Mcclean

Production Coordinator

Stephen Mclaughlin

Music Recordist/Mixer

Jerzy Mizak

Assistant Director

Marnie Moore

Foley Artist

Dana Mulligan

Associate Film Editor

Rita Nagy

Assistant Director

Gabriella Nemeth

Hair Supervisor

Tamas P. Nyerges

2nd Camera Operator

Tamas P. Nyerges

Steadicam Operator

Margie O'malley

Foley Artist

Ferenc Ormos

Special Effects

David Parker

Re-Recording Mixer

Vanessa Pereira

Casting

Craig Pettigrew

Music Editor

Grzegorz Piatkowski

Art Director (Poland Crew)

Nada Pinter

Script Supervisor

Richard Quinn

Dialogue Editor

Peter Racz

Assistant Director

Elemer Ragalyi

Director Of Photography

Frank Rinella

Foley Recordist

Laszlo Rorarius

Location Manager

Lew Rywin

Associate Producer (Poland)

Nina Saxon

Main/End Title Design

Leslie Shatz

Re-Recording Mixer

Edward Shearmur

Music

Claire Simpson

Editor

Suzanne Smith

Casting

Wieslawa Starska

Costume Designer

Malgorzata Stefaniak

Wardrobe Mistress

Andras Suranyi

Assistant Director

Dusty Symonds

Unit Production Manager

Michal Szczerbic

Production Manager (Poland Crew)

Andrej Szenajch

Military Costumer

Magdalena Szwarcbart

Assistant Director (Poland Crew)

Magdalena Szwarcbart

Casting

Vladimir A Timm

Song ("Beer Barrell Polka (Roll Out The Barrell)")

Michael Umble

Publicity

Jaromir Vejvoda

Song ("Beer Barrell Polka (Roll Out The Barrell)")

Ian Whittaker

Set Decorator

Marsha Garces Williams

Producer

Robin Williams

Executive Producer

Clive Winter

Sound Mixer

Kazimierz Wroblewski

Pyro Technician (Poland Crew)

Vasek Zeman

Song ("Beer Barrrell Polka (Roll Out The Barrell)")

Film Details

Also Known As
Jakob le menteur
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Period
War
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Cinema Research Corporation; Columbia Pictures; Deluxe Entertainment Services Group; Sony Pictures Imageworks, Inc.
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing; Buena Vista International; Cts; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Sony Pictures Releasing; Sony Pictures Releasing International; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Poland; Budapest, Hungary

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Articles

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole
Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 24, 1999

Released in United States on Video March 21, 2000

Released in United States September 1999

Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Gala) September 9-18, 1999.

Remake of "Jakob der Luegner" (East Germany/1975), directed by Frank Meyer.

Began shooting October 12, 1997.

Blue Wolf is Robin Williams' production company.

Completed shooting December 19, 1997.

Released in United States on Video March 21, 2000

Released in United States September 1999 (Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Gala) September 9-18, 1999.)

Released in United States Fall September 24, 1999