The Cider House Rules


2h 11m 1999
The Cider House Rules

Brief Synopsis

An orphan trained in medicine sets out to find his place in the world.

Film Details

Also Known As
Cider House Rules, Ciderhusreglerna, oeuvre de Dieu, la part du diable
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Medical
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX
Location
North Hampton, Massachusetts, USA; New England, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Synopsis

Homer Wells was a parent-less child, raised and mentored by his orphanage's doctor, a man named Larch. Their's was an extraordinary bond. Larch taught Homer everything about medicine and what he could about right and wrong. All Homer wanted was one thing Larch couldn't give him - rules to live by. Given the chance to leave the orphanage, and the only family he's ever known, Homer realizes there is an entire world to discover. His new life provides more excitement than he could have imagined, especially when Homer falls in love for the first time. But, when forced to make decisions that will change the course of his future, Homer ultimately realizes he can't escape his past.

Crew

Richard Abate

Transportation Captain

Richard Abate Jr.

Driver

Gina R. Alfano

Adr Editor

Alan Allinger

Foreman

John Alzapiedi

Special Thanks To

Susan Anderson

Costumes

Robert M Andres

Key Grip

Rand Angelicola

Scenic Artist

Rodney Armanino

Construction Coordinator

Louis Armstrong

Song Performer

Jonathan Askew

Carpenter

Jeff Atmajian

Music Arranger

Denise Avallon

Driver

Bob Balfour

Special Thanks To

Kerry Barden

Casting

Allison Barton

Grip

Judson Bell

Carpenter

Richard J Bell

Other

Mark Bennett

Casting Associate

William Bergland

Carpenter

Irving Berlin

Song

Louis Bertini

Foley Editor

Ulf Bjorck

Other

Sarah Black

Other

Chloe Bland

Assistant

Alan C. Blomquist

Coproducer

Robert Bolanowski

Special Effects

Ron Bolanowski

Special Effects Coordinator

Harry Peck Bolles

Adr Editor

Robert Bookman

Special Thanks To

Phillip Borsos

Other

David Bostic

Driver

David Boulton

Adr Mixer

Daniel Boxer

Assistant Property Master

Timothy Brooks

Production Assistant

Marcia Brown

Special Thanks To

Richard Buttero

Driver

Michael Caldwell

Special Thanks To

Lon Caracappa

Rigging Gaffer

David Carbonara

Music Editor

John Carbonara

Music

Robert Carnes

Driver

Governor Paul Cellucci

Special Thanks To

Bob Chefalas

Rerecording

Marty Cherrix

Location Casting

Eric Christoffersen

Consultant

Susan Christy

Craft Service

Lisa Zeno Churgin

Editor

Richard P. Cirincione

Sound Effects Editor

Laura Civiello

Dialogue Editor

Deborah Clapp

Medic

Douglas Cluff

Scenic Artist

Bobby Cohen

Executive Producer

Nydia Colo'n

Stand-In

Sharyn Cordice

Makeup Assistant

Tom Costley

Driver

Dan Courchaine

Scenic Artist

Dr Cowan

Special Thanks To

William Coyman

Driver

Chris Cozens

Other

Marianne Crescenzi

Production Coordinator

John Cronk

Driver

Charlie Croughwell

Stunt Coordinator

Robert Cuddy

Other

Sven Davisson

Location Assistant

Robin Dawson

Special Thanks To

Andrew J. Day

Gaffer

Sig De Miguel

Casting Associate

Jeff Debell

Other

Steve Deboer

Carpenter

Vaughn Deleath

Song Performer

Rick Destacio

Driver

Chris Dibbil

Other

Michael Diieso

Best Boy Grip

Nick Diloretto

Driver

Deborah Maxwell Dion

Casting Associate

Mort Dixon

Song

Jeff Dobbs

Special Thanks To

Norm Dodge

Special Thanks To

Joe Dohner

Foley Mixer

Tommy Dorsey

Song

Dennis Doyle

Set Production Assistant

Robert Dudley

Driver

Dave Duggan

Driver

Stephen P Dunn

Assistant Director

Sarah Elliott

Office Assistant

Wilbur Ellis

Driver

Colby Enders

Office Assistant

James B Faulkner

Carpenter

Carl Fischer

Boom Operator

Mark Fitzgerald

Assistant Location Manager

Kerry Fitzmaurice

Location Assistant

James Flemming

Caterer

Lorin Flemming

Other

Jimmy Flynn

Transportation

Francis Foley

Production

Mary Ford

Special Thanks To

Nathan Ford

Office Assistant

Chris Fousek

On-Set Dresser

Dr. Denise Galinas

Special Thanks To

Elena Gavrilova

Assistant

George Gershwin

Song

George Gershwin

Song Performer

Ira Gershwin

Song

Terel Gibson

Apprentice

Lea Giraldi

Special Thanks To

Lauri Gladstein

Special Thanks To

Richard Gladstein

Producer

Chad Glastonbury

Negative Cutting

David Godfree

Other

Dr Goldberg

Special Thanks To

Jane Goldsmith

Script Supervisor

Dihann Green

Consultant

Wylie Young Griffin

Art Department Coordinator

David Gropman

Production Designer

Jerry Guarino

Driver

Jill Hahn

Assistant Production Accountant

Dr. Richard Halgin

Special Thanks To

Barbara A Hall

Unit Production Manager

Nils Hallstrom

Other

George Hamer

Other

Sandy Hamilton

Property Master

Charles Harrington

Location Manager

Paul Harrington

Stand-In

J.j. Harris

Special Thanks To

Barbara J Hause

Wardrobe Supervisor

Jerry Hebda

Special Thanks To

Clark Henderson

Special Thanks To

Ray Henderson

Song

Gerry Hernandez

Caterer

Wayne Herndon

Hair Stylist

Roger Hitchcock

Driver

Petur Hliddal

Sound Mixer

Leslie Holleran

Coproducer

Brandon Hollyer

Accountant

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Toni Howard

Special Thanks To

Joni Huth

Other

Janet Turnbull Irving

Special Thanks To

John Irving

Source Material (From Novel)

John Irving

Screenplay

Timothy C Jackson

Carpenter

Janice Jacobs

Other

Tracey Jacobs

Special Thanks To

Michael Jacobson

Set Production Assistant

April Janow

Production Accountant

Kim Jennings

Assistant Art Director

Rick Johnston

Stand-In

George Jones

Stand-In

Gus Kahn

Song

Renee Ehrlich Kalfus

Costume Designer

Jenny Kane

Other

Kelly Keough

Other

Richard Kerekes

Dolly Grip

Jay Kessel

Assistant Sound Editor

Sarco Kirklian

Grip

Bruce Kitzmeyer

Foley Editor

Sherry Koftan

Stand-In

Eric Komar

Grip

Dan Korintus

Dialogue Editor

Jasmine Kosovic

Post-Production Coordinator

David Kramer's Looping Group

Music

Eric Kranzler

Special Thanks To

Laura Kreft

Accountant

May Kuckro

Assistant Editor

Joshua Landis

Assistant Sound Editor

Deborah Larsen

Makeup Artist

Holly Laws

Other

Margaret Leigh Palmer

Set Costumer

Chad Lemieux

Set Production Assistant

John Lenehan

Other

Les Brown And The Band Of Renown

Song Performer

Lisa Lesniak

Costumes

Keith G Lewis

Set Costumer

Dr. Verneda Lights-sagay

Special Thanks To

Marissa Littlefield

Adr Editor

Chris Lombardi

Camera Operator

Dr. Laurence Lundy

Special Thanks To

Alasdair Maclellan

Set Production Assistant

Al Magliochetti

Visual Effects Supervisor

Randy Manion

Art Assistant

Lisa Mantoux

Assistant

Roger Marbury

Other

Jonathan Martin

Construction Manager

Bobby Martini

Driver

Cameron Matheson

Carpenter

Eric Matheson

Other

Jack Mcbride

Driver

Roderick Mccellan

Driver

Cassy Mcevoy

Other

Tom Mcguire

Special Thanks To

Robert Mckown

Carpenter

Sophie Mcmenamin

Assistant

Brenda Mcnally

Hair Assistant

Jennifer Mcnamara

Casting Associate

Cary Meadow

Special Thanks To

Bob Melky

Special Thanks To

Cheryl Miller

Accounting Assistant

Matt Miller

Key Rigging Grip

Don Mink

Post-Production Accountant

Film Details

Also Known As
Cider House Rules, Ciderhusreglerna, oeuvre de Dieu, la part du diable
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Medical
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX
Location
North Hampton, Massachusetts, USA; New England, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Award Wins

Best Adapted Screenplay

1999
John Irving

Best Adapted Screenplay

1999

Best Supporting Actor

1999
Michael Caine

Best Supporting Actor

2000
Michael Caine

Award Nominations

Set Decoration

1999

Best Director

1999
Lasse Hallstrom

Best Editing

1999

Best Original Score

1999

Best Picture

1999

Articles

The Cider House Rules


The Cider House Rules (1999) was based on a 1985 novel by John Irving. Homer Wells grows up in an orphanage run by the kindly Dr. Wilbur Larch, an ether addict who performs abortions secretly. He takes Homer under his wing after he is returned twice by foster parents, and trains him in obstetrics and abortions, although Homer is against abortion and refuses to do them. He eventually leaves the orphanage and falls in love with Candy Kendall while her boyfriend, Wally Worthington, is reported missing in World War II. Wally returns from the war paralyzed, and with the death of Dr. Larch, Homer leaves to run the orphanage as Larch wished.

Actors from Leonardo DiCaprio, Ethan Hawke, James Franco, and Matt Damon were considered for Homer, but it was Tobey Maguire who won the role. Liv Tyler and Tori Spelling were rumored to have been up for the role of Candy, which went to Charlize Theron. Irving had wanted his son, Colin, to play Wally, a character based on the father he never knew, who survived being shot down over Burma in World War II. By the time the film was made, Colin was too old to play Wally (which went to Paul Rudd) and was given the role of Major Winslow. John Irving himself appeared in a cameo role as the St. Cloud stationmaster. Four directors were considered in the fifteen years it took to get the film made, including Canadian filmmaker Phillip Borsos, who died of leukemia in 1995 at the age of 41. He was replaced with Lasse Hallström, best known for My Life as a Dog (1985).

A co-production of FilmColony, Nina Saxon Film Design, and Miramax Films, the film also starred Michael Caine as Dr. Larch and Jane Alexander as Nurse Edna, with Erykah Badu, Kate Nelligan, and Kathy Baker. With a modest budget of $24 million, The Cider House Rules went into production in November 1998 and was shot at various locations in the Northeastern United States, including Northampton State Hospital in Massachusetts (a former mental institution which was used for the orphanage), Sand Beach in Bar Harbor, Maine, and Brattleboro, Vermont.

Released in October 1999, the reviews were generally positive, although Roger Ebert, writing for The Chicago Sun-Times wrote, "I left the theater wondering what the movie thought it was about and was unable to say. It's almost deliberately unfocused; it shows us many events without guiding them to add up to anything definite." The Cider House Rules earned seven Academy Award nominations, and won two: Best Adapted Screenplay for Irving and Best Supporting Actor for Michael Caine.

By Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES:

Gussow, Mel "A Novelist Builds Out From Fact To Reach The Truth; John Irving Begins With His Memories." The New York Times 28 Apr 1998
The Internet Movie Database
http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-cider-house-rules-1999
The Cider House Rules

The Cider House Rules

The Cider House Rules (1999) was based on a 1985 novel by John Irving. Homer Wells grows up in an orphanage run by the kindly Dr. Wilbur Larch, an ether addict who performs abortions secretly. He takes Homer under his wing after he is returned twice by foster parents, and trains him in obstetrics and abortions, although Homer is against abortion and refuses to do them. He eventually leaves the orphanage and falls in love with Candy Kendall while her boyfriend, Wally Worthington, is reported missing in World War II. Wally returns from the war paralyzed, and with the death of Dr. Larch, Homer leaves to run the orphanage as Larch wished. Actors from Leonardo DiCaprio, Ethan Hawke, James Franco, and Matt Damon were considered for Homer, but it was Tobey Maguire who won the role. Liv Tyler and Tori Spelling were rumored to have been up for the role of Candy, which went to Charlize Theron. Irving had wanted his son, Colin, to play Wally, a character based on the father he never knew, who survived being shot down over Burma in World War II. By the time the film was made, Colin was too old to play Wally (which went to Paul Rudd) and was given the role of Major Winslow. John Irving himself appeared in a cameo role as the St. Cloud stationmaster. Four directors were considered in the fifteen years it took to get the film made, including Canadian filmmaker Phillip Borsos, who died of leukemia in 1995 at the age of 41. He was replaced with Lasse Hallström, best known for My Life as a Dog (1985). A co-production of FilmColony, Nina Saxon Film Design, and Miramax Films, the film also starred Michael Caine as Dr. Larch and Jane Alexander as Nurse Edna, with Erykah Badu, Kate Nelligan, and Kathy Baker. With a modest budget of $24 million, The Cider House Rules went into production in November 1998 and was shot at various locations in the Northeastern United States, including Northampton State Hospital in Massachusetts (a former mental institution which was used for the orphanage), Sand Beach in Bar Harbor, Maine, and Brattleboro, Vermont. Released in October 1999, the reviews were generally positive, although Roger Ebert, writing for The Chicago Sun-Times wrote, "I left the theater wondering what the movie thought it was about and was unable to say. It's almost deliberately unfocused; it shows us many events without guiding them to add up to anything definite." The Cider House Rules earned seven Academy Award nominations, and won two: Best Adapted Screenplay for Irving and Best Supporting Actor for Michael Caine. By Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: Gussow, Mel "A Novelist Builds Out From Fact To Reach The Truth; John Irving Begins With His Memories." The New York Times 28 Apr 1998 The Internet Movie Database http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-cider-house-rules-1999

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 1999 award for Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published (John Irving) from the Writers Guild of America.

Winner of the 1999 award for Best Screenplay from the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures.

Winner of the 1999 Golden Satellite for Best Adapted Screenplay (John Irving) from the International Press Aacademy.

Expanded Release in United States December 25, 1999

Expanded Release in United States February 18, 2000

Expanded Release in United States February 25, 2000

Expanded Release in United States March 10, 2000

Expanded Release in United States March 17, 2000

Expanded Release in United States March 3, 2000

Released in United States October 1999

Released in United States on Video August 15, 2000

Released in United States September 1999

Released in United States Winter December 10, 1999

Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Gala) September 9-18, 1999.

Shown at Venice International Film Festival (in competition) September 1-11, 1999.

Michael Winterbottom was previously attached to direct.

Previously in development at Beacon Communications with Phillip Borsos attached to direct.

Began shooting September 21, 1998.

Completed shooting December 12, 1998.

Wide released in USA January 7, 2000.

Expanded Release in United States February 18, 2000

Expanded Release in United States February 25, 2000

Expanded Release in United States March 3, 2000

Expanded Release in United States March 10, 2000

Expanded Release in United States March 17, 2000

Released in United States on Video August 15, 2000

Released in United States September 1999 (Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Gala) September 9-18, 1999.)

Released in United States September 1999 (Shown at Venice International Film Festival (in competition) September 1-11, 1999.)

Released in United States October 1999 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Opening Night Gala) October 21-29, 1999.)

Released in United States Winter December 10, 1999

Expanded Release in United States December 25, 1999