The Truth About Charlie


1h 44m 2002

Brief Synopsis

Regina ('Reggie') Lambert meets the charming Joshua Peters while vacationing in Martinique, just as she contemplates ending her whirlwind marriage to the enigmatic Charlie. But upon her return to Paris, she finds that both her apartment and her bank account have been emptied and that her husband has

Film Details

Also Known As
Charade, Truth About Charlie
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Paris, France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Synopsis

Regina ('Reggie') Lambert meets the charming Joshua Peters while vacationing in Martinique, just as she contemplates ending her whirlwind marriage to the enigmatic Charlie. But upon her return to Paris, she finds that both her apartment and her bank account have been emptied and that her husband has been mysteriously murdered. A trio of his old cohorts has begun shadowing her in hopes of answering their own questions about Charlie. Joshua is in Paris now, too and is ready to offer any help he can. However, the more Reggie learns the more she must find out to fill in the missing pieces of this puzzle and to protect herself from ever-increasing danger. Joshua lays a growing claim on her affection, even as disturbing information about him surfaces and undermines her trust. Hard-edged Commandant Dominique thinks Reggie herself is the most likely suspect. The attention of a straight-laced embassy official makes Reggie's situation even more complicated. But all she can do is carry on with the knowledge that in life, as in love, nothing is ever as simple as it seems.

Crew

Marion Abadie

Assistant

Jean-marc Abbou

Unit Manager

Samuel Adebiyi

Song

Betsy Alton

Production Coordinator

Deva Anderson

Music Supervisor

David Arch

Music Conductor

Jean Bertrand Aristide

Song

Jean Bertrand Aristide

Song Performer

Neda Armian

Coproducer

Natacha Atlas

Song Performer

Natacha Atlas

Song

Eric Aufevre

Location Manager

Charles Aznavour

Song Performer

Charles Aznavour

Song

Charles Aznavour

Other

Charles Aznavour

Music Lyrics

Ted Bafaloukos

Unit Director

Jamie Baker

Foley Editor

Pit Baumgartner

Song

Cedric Belise

Song

Jessica Bendinger

Screenplay

Howard Bernstein

Song

Ron Bochar

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Ron Bochar

Supervising Sound Editor

Aude Boedec

Production Coordinator

Aline Bonetto

Set Decorator

Eric Bourges

Construction Manager

Khaled Hady Brahim

Song Performer

Khaled Hady Brahim

Song

Jeb Brody

Assistant

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutter

David Campi-lemaire

Assistant Director

Patrick Capone

Camera Operator

David Carbonara

Music Editor

Pierre Carre

Song Performer

Jose Lucas Casas

Hair

Kam Chan

Foley

Steven Chandra Savale

Song

Manu Chao

Song Performer

Manu Chao

Song

Michel Cheyko

Coproducer

Michel Cheyko

Assistant Director

Bertrand Clercq-roques

Art Director

Arnaud Codet

Song

Samuel Cohen

Boom Operator

Philippe Cohen-solal

Song

Francoise Combadiere-stern

Casting

Marko Costanzo

Foley Artist

M Crespin

Song

Andrew Cronshaw

Song

Mario D'orio

Best Boy Grip

Aniruddha Das

Song

Lhasa De Sala

Song Performer

Lhasa De Sala

Song

Mercan Dede

Song

Mercan Dede

Song Performer

Khalid Dehbi

Song

Thierry Delettre

Costume Supervisor

Jonathan Demme

Producer

Jonathan Demme

Screenplay

Ted Demme

Song

Ted Demme

Song Performer

Jean-pierre Deschamps

Key Grip

Tom Desisto

Song

Yves Desrosiers

Song Performer

Chris Dibble

Music Engineer

Laetitia Dom

Production Secretary

Peter Donen

Visual Effects Supervisor

Mary Donohue

Assistant

Kate Dowd

Consultant

Dianne Dreyer

Script Supervisor

Joe Dunne

Stunt Coordinator

Syd Dutton

Visual Effects

Otto Engelhardt

Song

Mark Ernestus

Song

Michel Estrade

Song

Benjamin Euvrard

Assistant

Chaba Fadela

Song Performer

Zelmat Fadela

Song

Mehdi Felicite

Song

Pablo Ferro

Titles

Tom Fleischman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Dominique Fouassier

Stunt Coordinator

Tak Fujimoto

Director Of Photography

Tak Fujimoto

Other

Carl Fullerton

Makeup

Chris Gandois

Choreographer

Olivier Garabedian

Location Manager

Denis Gastou

Special Makeup Effects

Lewis Goldstein

Sound Effects Editor

Karen Gordon

Production Accountant

Leigh Gorman

Song

Leigh Gorman

Song Performer

Finian Greenall

Song

Richard Guay

Post-Production Supervisor

Sanjay Gulabbhai Tailor

Song

Angela Harmon

Assistant

Ilona Herzberg

Executive Producer

Ilona Herzberg

Line Producer

Robyn Hitchcock

Song

Bonnie Hlinomaz

Assistant

Gilles Husson

Grip

Georges Jeannot

Song

Silver Johnson

Song

Peter Joshua

Screenplay

Anna Karina

Song

Anna Karina

Song Performer

Kevin Keefe

Transportation Captain

Michel Kharat

Sound

Angelique Kidjo

Song Performer

Buzz Kilman

Song Performer

Steve Kirshoff

Special Effects Coordinator

Peter Kohn

Unit Director

Marty Kornblum

Song

Michael Kosarin

Music Conductor

G Krier

Song

Kevin Ladson

Property Master

Olivier Lambert

Location Manager

George Lara

Foley Recordist

Anne Le Van Ra

Art Department Coordinator

Hamilton Lee

Song

Catherine Leterrier

Costume Designer

Ellen Lewis

Consultant

Mark Linkous

Song Performer

Mark Linkous

Song

Carol Littleton

Editor

Hugo Luczyc-wyhowski

Production Designer

Delphine Mabed

Art Director

Didier Makaga

Song Performer

Didier Makaga

Song

Eduardo Makaroff

Song

Polly Mallinson

Music Coordinator

Henry Mancini

Song

Malcolm Mclaren

Song

Malcolm Mclaren

Song Performer

I Mellino

Song

Glenn Mercer

Song

Johnny Mercer

Song

Raz Mesinai

Song

Nick Meyers

Music Editor

William A Miller

Key Grip

Bill Million

Song

Jean-marc Miroglio

Song

Sahraoui Mohamed

Song

Mikael Monod

Gaffer

Pierre Morel

Camera Operator

Donald J. Mowat

Makeup

Branka Mrkic-tana

Dialogue Editor

Christoph Muller

Song

Jennifer Mulot

Other

Patrice Musson

Storyboard Artist

Jennifer Alex Nickason

Set Decorator

Gerard Nubui

Song

Claire O'neil

Rights & Clearances

Peter Owen

Wig Maker

Nicholas Page

Song

John Ashok Pandit

Song

Krista Parris

Assistant

J M Paulus

Song

Suzana Perl

Music Editor

Ron Petagna

Construction Coordinator

Fabien Philetas

Song

Dominique Piat

Script Supervisor

Patricia Pierangeli

Dialogue Coach

Gilbert Pieri

Property Master

Denise Pinckley

Production Manager

Rachel Portman

Music Composer

Rachel Portman

Original Music

Rachel Portman

Song

Rachel Portman

Music Producer

Trevanna Post

Post-Production Accountant

Julien Pruvot

Transportation Captain

Scott Ramsey

Gaffer

Ken Regan

Photography

Christine Richard

Script Supervisor

Emmanuel Rigaut

Assistant

Marie-ange Ripka

Hair Stylist

Pete Romano

Director Of Photography

Pete Romano

Other

Fred Rosenberg

Dialogue Editor

James Sabat

Sound Mixer

Michel Sabourdy

Best Boy Electric

Cheb Sahraoui

Song Performer

Peter Saraf

Producer

Edward Saxon

Producer

Steve Schmidt

Screenplay

Oona Seiler

Assistant

Dee Shipman

Music Lyrics

Tjinder Singh

Song

David Snell

Music Conductor

Suzanne Spangler

Editor

Mike Stanwick

Color Timer

Peter Stone

Source Material

Catherine Sudolcan

Visual Effects Producer

Rachid Taha

Song

Rachid Taha

Song Performer

Bill Taylor

Visual Effects

Manuel Teran

Camera Operator

Olivier Thaon

Unit Production Manager

Nathalie Tissier

Makeup Designer

Film Details

Also Known As
Charade, Truth About Charlie
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Paris, France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Articles

Remake - The Truth About Charlie


THE TRUTH ABOUT CHARLIE - the remake of CHARADE

If you had to pick a current leading man who could pass as the modern day equivalent of Cary Grant, Mark Walhberg probably wouldn't be the first actor that comes to mind. Yet Walhberg is stepping into Grant's shoes for a remake of the 1964 Stanley Donan mystery-romance, Charade. Now titled The Truth About Charlie, the film went into production earlier in the year but was halted when director Ted Demme died unexpectedly during a recreational game of basketball. Ted's brother, Jonathan, has since been enlisted in the project and the film is now gearing up for an October release.

Like Charade, The Truth About Charlie is also set in Paris with a very similar storyline (based on a screenplay by Peter Stone with additional material from Jonathan Demme): Regina (Thandie Newton) returns home from a vacation and finds her Parisian flat stripped bare and swarming with police bearing news that her husband, Charles Lambert, is dead. Regina's life quickly takes a darker turn as several rather dubious former acquaintances of her husband began to watch her every move. Yet whenever Regina finds herself in a threatening situation, a complete stranger who calls himself Joshua Peters (Mark Wahlberg) always shows up to rescue her. There's also a quirky investigator named Mr. Bartholomew (Tim Robbins) who is no less mysterious than Peters or Lambert's shady associates.

Time will tell if Demme can pull off a romantic suspense thriller than can equal or top the original Charade but The Truth About Charlie has a lot to overcome - an interrupted shooting schedule, an emergency replacement of the director, script changes and two leads - Wahlberg and Newton - who have yet to prove they have the romantic chemistry to match the Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn's charisma. The supporting cast promises to be interesting though with cameos by former French New Wave siren Anna Karina and Magali Noel, a Turkish actress who was prominently featured in Fellini's Amarcord and other Italian and French films.

For more information on The Truth About Charlie, visit The Official Web Site.

By Jeff Stafford

MR. DEEDS & OTHER REMAKES YOU CAN LIVE WITHOUT

Most classic movie fans will probably admit that Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) isn't exactly a comic masterpiece but nobody expected Sony Pictures to retool it as an Adam Sandler vehicle entitled simply, Mr. Deeds. The basic premise is essentially the same as the original - a naive, good-natured country boy by the name of Longfellow Deeds inherits a fortune from a relative and moves to the big city where various sharpies try to take advantage of him. But whereas the Capra version was corny but sweet-natured, the remake by Steven Brill (he also helmed Sandler's Little Nicky (2000) has been revived up with a non-stop stream of violent sight gags and body crunching physical slapstick. Just watching the trailer will make your head hurt. There is also an official web site for Mr. Deeds at http://www.sonypictures.com/movies/mrdeeds/ which features a "whack the foot" game which should give you some idea of the film's target audience. If you loved Dudley Do-Right (2000) with Brendan Fraser, you'll probably love this too. By the way, Mr. Deeds isn't the first time that Sandler has ripped off somebody else's movie without acknowledging it. Did anyone notice that his 1998 comedy The Waterboy was practically a scene for scene remake of Harold Lloyd's The Freshman (1925)?.

The fact that Hollywood continues to cannibalize its past for original ideas is nothing new and seeing Mr. Deeds Goes to Town recycled for Mr. Sandler isn't as bad as some of the other projects rumored to be in the works. For example, Steven Soderberg's much-delayed remake of Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris (1972), a moody, dreamlike tale about a disastrous space mission that is set in an unspecified future. It's hard to imagine a more wrong-headed project. Despite the fact that the film has been attached to Soderberg's name (as director) with George Clooney heading the cast, it's hard to get excited about an English language remark of Tarkovsky's poetic meditation on the human race. Another "why bother?" idea is director Neil LaBute's rumored remake of The Wicker Man (1973), a suspense thriller about a pagan cult which was written by Anthony Schaffer and directed by Robin Hardy. Of course, a lot of people never got to see the original Wicker Man (1973) during its initial American release (in a drastically edited version) so LuBute's version might seem like a fantastic new idea to many.

More blasphemous is the possible remake of The Manchurian Candidate (1962), John Frankenheimer's witty, super-paranoid thriller about political assassins that prefigured John F. Kennedy's murder. Tina Sinatra, daughter of Frank (who starred in the film), now controls the rights (which her father passed on to her) and is rumored to have greenlighted a remake. Equally cringe-inducing is a possible remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) from filmmaker Michael Bay. That's right, the guy who directed Armageddon (1998) and Pearl Harbor (2001). Variety reported that Chainsaw's original director, Tobe Hooper, and screenwriter Kim Henkel are working on a first draft rewrite.

By Jeff Stafford

MURDEROUS MAIDS - The Mad Sisters of Le Mans

In 1933, the French public was shocked and fascinated by a brutal double murder committed by two sisters in the provincial town of Le Mans. Christine and Lea Papin, who were working as servants, attacked and killed their employer, Madame Lancelin, and her daughter, during a power outage in the house. Even the police were shocked by the extreme violence of the crime; the victims' bodies had been horribly mutilated and their eyes clawed out. When Christine and Lea were brought to trial, their case was highly publicized and created further controversy when it was discovered that the two sisters were lovers. This infamous incident is now the subject of a new film, Murderous Maids (2001), directed by Jean-Pierre Denis.

For years, the Lancelin murders have held a strange fascination for the French, particularly those in the arts. Jean Genet wrote The Maids in 1947 and based his play on the Le Mans case (It was later made into a film in 1974 starring Glenda Jackson and Susannah York). More significant are the number of films inspired by Christine and Lea Papin. First, there was Les Abysses (1963), directed by Nico Papatakis; then, A Judgment in Stone (aka The Housekeeper) appeared in 1986 starring Rita Tushingham and Jackie Burroughs (It was a Canadian film directed by Ousama Rawi). More recent versions include Sister, My Sister (1993), Nancy Meckler's version of the Wendy Kesselman play that emphasized the sexual politics (Joely Richardson and Jodi May played Christine and Lea, respectively) and Claude Chabrol's Le Ceremonie (1995) starring Sandrine Bonnaire and Isabelle Huppert; it presents the tragedy as a class struggle between the upper class bourgeoisie and the working class.

For Murderous Maids (2001), director Denis has chosen to focus closely on the true facts in the case, making it the most faithful film recreation yet of the Papin sisters' relationship and subsequent crime. In a New York Times article by Leslie Camhi, Denis was quoted as saying, "It's a story that touches upon our deepest, darkest impulses. These two women were presented as monsters in the press of the day. Well, I wanted to follow the path from monsters back to human beings." He also added, "During the trial, there were massive demonstrations of people from all social classes, calling for the death of the Papin sisters. Well, recently they were listed in a poll as among the best-known celebrities in the region. Le Mans is known for its 24-hour car race, its rillettes [a kind of meat spread] and the Papin sisters. History had digested their crime and made it a part of the patrimony."

Although the film is currently in limited release in the U.S., it is receiving excellent critical notices. J. Hoberman of The Village Voice wrote: "Revolution for the hell of it? The Papin sisters, who provided no motive for their homicidal mania, let alone its gruesome details of eye-gouging, corpse-mutilating brutality, did seem to embody a particularly extreme vision of class warfare, albeit in a realm beyond articulation. (Afterward, the women dutifully cleaned their implements and took to their bed.) Director Jean-Pierre Denis, returning to filmmaking after 12 years as a customs inspector, reconstructs what he can of the sisters' background, locating them in an oppressive context of household drudgery and authoritarian abuse, while suggesting that their liberation fantasy was a dream of impossible symbiosis....Murderous Maids dramatizes, but it doesn't explain. The inference in this genuinely unnerving movie is that nothing can."

For more information about Murderous Maids and to see if it is playing at a theatre in your area, visit RIALTO PICTURES.

By Jeff Stafford

Remake - The Truth About Charlie

Remake - The Truth About Charlie

THE TRUTH ABOUT CHARLIE - the remake of CHARADE If you had to pick a current leading man who could pass as the modern day equivalent of Cary Grant, Mark Walhberg probably wouldn't be the first actor that comes to mind. Yet Walhberg is stepping into Grant's shoes for a remake of the 1964 Stanley Donan mystery-romance, Charade. Now titled The Truth About Charlie, the film went into production earlier in the year but was halted when director Ted Demme died unexpectedly during a recreational game of basketball. Ted's brother, Jonathan, has since been enlisted in the project and the film is now gearing up for an October release. Like Charade, The Truth About Charlie is also set in Paris with a very similar storyline (based on a screenplay by Peter Stone with additional material from Jonathan Demme): Regina (Thandie Newton) returns home from a vacation and finds her Parisian flat stripped bare and swarming with police bearing news that her husband, Charles Lambert, is dead. Regina's life quickly takes a darker turn as several rather dubious former acquaintances of her husband began to watch her every move. Yet whenever Regina finds herself in a threatening situation, a complete stranger who calls himself Joshua Peters (Mark Wahlberg) always shows up to rescue her. There's also a quirky investigator named Mr. Bartholomew (Tim Robbins) who is no less mysterious than Peters or Lambert's shady associates. Time will tell if Demme can pull off a romantic suspense thriller than can equal or top the original Charade but The Truth About Charlie has a lot to overcome - an interrupted shooting schedule, an emergency replacement of the director, script changes and two leads - Wahlberg and Newton - who have yet to prove they have the romantic chemistry to match the Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn's charisma. The supporting cast promises to be interesting though with cameos by former French New Wave siren Anna Karina and Magali Noel, a Turkish actress who was prominently featured in Fellini's Amarcord and other Italian and French films. For more information on The Truth About Charlie, visit The Official Web Site. By Jeff Stafford MR. DEEDS & OTHER REMAKES YOU CAN LIVE WITHOUT Most classic movie fans will probably admit that Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) isn't exactly a comic masterpiece but nobody expected Sony Pictures to retool it as an Adam Sandler vehicle entitled simply, Mr. Deeds. The basic premise is essentially the same as the original - a naive, good-natured country boy by the name of Longfellow Deeds inherits a fortune from a relative and moves to the big city where various sharpies try to take advantage of him. But whereas the Capra version was corny but sweet-natured, the remake by Steven Brill (he also helmed Sandler's Little Nicky (2000) has been revived up with a non-stop stream of violent sight gags and body crunching physical slapstick. Just watching the trailer will make your head hurt. There is also an official web site for Mr. Deeds at http://www.sonypictures.com/movies/mrdeeds/ which features a "whack the foot" game which should give you some idea of the film's target audience. If you loved Dudley Do-Right (2000) with Brendan Fraser, you'll probably love this too. By the way, Mr. Deeds isn't the first time that Sandler has ripped off somebody else's movie without acknowledging it. Did anyone notice that his 1998 comedy The Waterboy was practically a scene for scene remake of Harold Lloyd's The Freshman (1925)?. The fact that Hollywood continues to cannibalize its past for original ideas is nothing new and seeing Mr. Deeds Goes to Town recycled for Mr. Sandler isn't as bad as some of the other projects rumored to be in the works. For example, Steven Soderberg's much-delayed remake of Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris (1972), a moody, dreamlike tale about a disastrous space mission that is set in an unspecified future. It's hard to imagine a more wrong-headed project. Despite the fact that the film has been attached to Soderberg's name (as director) with George Clooney heading the cast, it's hard to get excited about an English language remark of Tarkovsky's poetic meditation on the human race. Another "why bother?" idea is director Neil LaBute's rumored remake of The Wicker Man (1973), a suspense thriller about a pagan cult which was written by Anthony Schaffer and directed by Robin Hardy. Of course, a lot of people never got to see the original Wicker Man (1973) during its initial American release (in a drastically edited version) so LuBute's version might seem like a fantastic new idea to many. More blasphemous is the possible remake of The Manchurian Candidate (1962), John Frankenheimer's witty, super-paranoid thriller about political assassins that prefigured John F. Kennedy's murder. Tina Sinatra, daughter of Frank (who starred in the film), now controls the rights (which her father passed on to her) and is rumored to have greenlighted a remake. Equally cringe-inducing is a possible remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) from filmmaker Michael Bay. That's right, the guy who directed Armageddon (1998) and Pearl Harbor (2001). Variety reported that Chainsaw's original director, Tobe Hooper, and screenwriter Kim Henkel are working on a first draft rewrite. By Jeff Stafford MURDEROUS MAIDS - The Mad Sisters of Le Mans In 1933, the French public was shocked and fascinated by a brutal double murder committed by two sisters in the provincial town of Le Mans. Christine and Lea Papin, who were working as servants, attacked and killed their employer, Madame Lancelin, and her daughter, during a power outage in the house. Even the police were shocked by the extreme violence of the crime; the victims' bodies had been horribly mutilated and their eyes clawed out. When Christine and Lea were brought to trial, their case was highly publicized and created further controversy when it was discovered that the two sisters were lovers. This infamous incident is now the subject of a new film, Murderous Maids (2001), directed by Jean-Pierre Denis. For years, the Lancelin murders have held a strange fascination for the French, particularly those in the arts. Jean Genet wrote The Maids in 1947 and based his play on the Le Mans case (It was later made into a film in 1974 starring Glenda Jackson and Susannah York). More significant are the number of films inspired by Christine and Lea Papin. First, there was Les Abysses (1963), directed by Nico Papatakis; then, A Judgment in Stone (aka The Housekeeper) appeared in 1986 starring Rita Tushingham and Jackie Burroughs (It was a Canadian film directed by Ousama Rawi). More recent versions include Sister, My Sister (1993), Nancy Meckler's version of the Wendy Kesselman play that emphasized the sexual politics (Joely Richardson and Jodi May played Christine and Lea, respectively) and Claude Chabrol's Le Ceremonie (1995) starring Sandrine Bonnaire and Isabelle Huppert; it presents the tragedy as a class struggle between the upper class bourgeoisie and the working class. For Murderous Maids (2001), director Denis has chosen to focus closely on the true facts in the case, making it the most faithful film recreation yet of the Papin sisters' relationship and subsequent crime. In a New York Times article by Leslie Camhi, Denis was quoted as saying, "It's a story that touches upon our deepest, darkest impulses. These two women were presented as monsters in the press of the day. Well, I wanted to follow the path from monsters back to human beings." He also added, "During the trial, there were massive demonstrations of people from all social classes, calling for the death of the Papin sisters. Well, recently they were listed in a poll as among the best-known celebrities in the region. Le Mans is known for its 24-hour car race, its rillettes [a kind of meat spread] and the Papin sisters. History had digested their crime and made it a part of the patrimony." Although the film is currently in limited release in the U.S., it is receiving excellent critical notices. J. Hoberman of The Village Voice wrote: "Revolution for the hell of it? The Papin sisters, who provided no motive for their homicidal mania, let alone its gruesome details of eye-gouging, corpse-mutilating brutality, did seem to embody a particularly extreme vision of class warfare, albeit in a realm beyond articulation. (Afterward, the women dutifully cleaned their implements and took to their bed.) Director Jean-Pierre Denis, returning to filmmaking after 12 years as a customs inspector, reconstructs what he can of the sisters' background, locating them in an oppressive context of household drudgery and authoritarian abuse, while suggesting that their liberation fantasy was a dream of impossible symbiosis....Murderous Maids dramatizes, but it doesn't explain. The inference in this genuinely unnerving movie is that nothing can." For more information about Murderous Maids and to see if it is playing at a theatre in your area, visit RIALTO PICTURES. By Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 25, 2002

Released in United States on Video April 1, 2003

Remake of "Charade" (USA/1963), directed by Stanley Donen and starring Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant.

Kodak

Released in United States Fall October 25, 2002

Released in United States on Video April 1, 2003