Take This Job And Shove It


1h 40m 1981

Brief Synopsis

Frank Maclin is given a project by his corporate bosses to revitalize the run-down brewery that they recently acquired in his hometown. Frank has become a success with the company and is not eager to move back to the town in Iowa he left ten years before, so he wants to make the changes quickly and leave. But things are complicated when his orders to increase productivity mean betraying the workers, and he doesn't have the heart to do it.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1981

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m

Synopsis

Frank Maclin is given a project by his corporate bosses, to revitalize the run-down brewery that they recently acquired in his hometown. Frank has become a success with the company and is not eager to move back to the town in Iowa he left ten years before, so he wants to make the changes quickly and leave. But things are complicated when his orders to increase productivity mean betraying the workers, and he doesn't have the heart to do it.

Crew

Gale Adler

Photography

Connie Anderson

Assistant

Brian Axelrod

Craft Service

Mike Axelrod

Production Assistant

Paul Baratta

Associate Producer

Ken Beauchene

Boom Operator

Richard Belding

Editor

Michael Beltran

Props

Jeffrey Bernini

From Story

Marilyn Black

Casting Associate

Greg Blackwell

Producer

Christy Bono

Other

Dennis Brandt

Assistant Editor

Vern Capaul

Other

Harry Caplan

Production Manager

David Allan Coe

Song

Skip Cook

Camera Assistant

Ivo Cristante

Property Master

Gordon Day

Sound

Doug Dean

Assistant Director

James Dultz

Art Director

Michael Fottrell

Location Manager

Bob Fox

Assistant Art Director

Jamie Freitag

Assistant Director

Susan Gelb

Other

David Glazer

Set Decorator

Frank Glenn

Assistant Director

Mike Gulenchyn

Electrician

Michael Christopher Gutierrez

Dialogue Editor

Pat Hall

Grip

Pat Hall

Electrician

Cathy Henderson

Casting

Joel Hirschhorn

Music Supervisor

Joel Hirschhorn

Music Producer

Samn Holcombe

Assistant Camera Operator

William J. Immerman

Executive Producer

Bill Justis

Original Music

Rick Kane

Production Assistant

Al Kasha

Associate Producer

Al Kasha

Music Supervisor

Al Kasha

Music Producer

Rodney Kemerer

Location Coordinator

Pat Kennedy

Stunts

Bob Krebsbach

Assistant Camera Operator

Carol Krupa

Production Assistant

Dale Larsen

Gaffer

Marshall Leib

Music Coordinator

Marshall Leib

Music Producer

Bob Lockrow

Photography

Scott Luhrsen

Transportation Captain

Eric Macbeth

Production Assistant

J David Marks

Executive Producer

Timaree Mccormick

Wardrobe Assistant

Tim Meledy

Production Assistant

Steve Meyers

Carpenter

John Mick

Sound Editor

Douglas Milsome

Director Of Photography

Richard Moore

Production Assistant

Betsy Oliver

Transportation Co-Captain

Betsy Oliver

Assistant

Pamela Peitzman

Makeup

Pamela Peitzman

Hair

Mark Pompian

Electrician

Ron Raschke

Camera Assistant

Susan Reidel

Casting

Ron Reynolds

Sound

Sharron Reynolds

Production Coordinator

Roberta Rodriguez

Makeup Assistant

Roberta Rodriguez

Hair

John R Savka

Dolly Grip

K.c. Scheibel

Production Assistant

Barry Schneider

From Story

Barry Schneider

Screenplay

Bob Seigert

Carpenter

Marcel V Shain

Camera Operator

Billy Sherrill

Music

Billy Sherrill

Music Producer

Jeffrey S Smith

Grip

Barry Spurlock

Special Effects

Jim Tanenbaum

Sound Mixer

James Waldbillig

Other

James Waldbillig

Other

Cynthia Weiner

Production Assistant

Carroll Whaler

Assistant

Ruth A Whittle

Production Accountant

Ruth Wolf

Production Assistant

Durinda Wood

Wardrobe

Eric Young

Electrician

Kathy Zatarga

Script Supervisor

Jack Ziga

Unit Production Manager

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1981

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m

Articles

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)


Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99.

The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941).

His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956).

As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace.

After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78).

The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters.

by Michael T. Toole
Eddie Albert (1906-2005)

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)

Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99. The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941). His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956). As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace. After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78). The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States May 15, 1981

Released in United States Spring May 1, 1981

Released in United States Spring May 1, 1981

Released in United States May 15, 1981