Seems Like Old Times


1h 42m 1980
Seems Like Old Times

Brief Synopsis

A liberal lady lawyer tries to hide her ex-husband when he's wrongly accused of bank robbery.

Film Details

Also Known As
Har vi inte setts förut?
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1980
Production Company
Rastar Productions
Distribution Company
Columbia-Emi-Warner; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

Writer Nick Gardenia is kidnapped from his California cliffhouse and forced to rob a bank. Now a fugitive, he seeks help from his ex-wife, Glenda.

Film Details

Also Known As
Har vi inte setts förut?
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1980
Production Company
Rastar Productions
Distribution Company
Columbia-Emi-Warner; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Articles

Seems Like Old Times


The 1980 romantic comedy Seems Like Old Times was the second and last pairing to date of stars Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase. The first time had been in the highly successful 1978 caper comedy Foul Play, which showed the stars' winning chemistry as an on-screen duo. In Seems Like Old Times, Chase plays Nick Gardenia, a writer who is kidnapped by two thugs and forced to rob a bank in California. Now a fugitive from justice, Nick hides out in the house of his ex-wife Glenda (Hawn), a soft-hearted defense lawyer whose new husband Ira (Charles Grodin) happens to be the District Attorney.

With an original screenplay by the legendary Neil Simon and direction by television comedy master Jay Sandrich, the combination of talent in Seems Like Old Times is a can't-miss formula for laughs. Simon penned some of the most famous comedies on stage and screen including Plaza Suite, Barefoot in the Park and The Goodbye Girl to name just a few. Sandrich made his name directing classic television sitcoms such as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Bob Newhart Show and The Cosby Show. Goldie Hawn loved the script immediately for Seems Like Old Times, though the prolific Neil Simon can hardly remember writing it. He was churning out so much work at the time that he was admittedly on creative autopilot. In some ways, Seems Like Old Times is a throwback to classic Hollywood comedies like The Talk of the Town (1942), a Cary Grant/Jean Arthur/Ronald Colman movie with a similar plotline.

Making Seems Like Old Times presented a personal challenge to Goldie Hawn. During the filming she was going through a divorce from Bill Hudson as well as juggling post-production demands on the movie she had just produced and starred in - Private Benjamin (1980). Even so, she managed to juggle everything successfully and make friends along the way. Co-star Charles Grodin remembered his time with Hawn fondly remarking what a good spirit she had on the set and how much she loved to laugh. Neil Simon called her "a rare combination. She can be very funny and very sexy. She has a true appreciation of what's funny and what's bleak in life." The work on both films paid off for Hawn. Both Private Benjamin and Seems Like Old Times were hits at the box office and helped make her an audience favorite. Seems Like Old Times harkened back to the romantic screwball comedies of the 1930s and 40s, which charmed audiences. The supporting cast of actors adds a great splash of fun including Yvonne Wilder as a sassy cook, T.K. Carter as a shifty chauffeur and Robert Guillaume as Ira's law partner.

Producer: Raymond Stark
Director: Jay Sandrich
Screenplay: Neil Simon
Art Direction: Peter Smith
Cinematography: David M. Walsh
Editing: Michael A. Stevenson
Music: Marvin Hamlisch
Cast: Goldie Hawn (Glenda), Chevy Chase (Nick), Charles Grodin (Ira Parks), Robert Guillaume (Fred), Harold Gould (Judge), George Grizzard (Stanley), T.K. Carter (Chester), Yvonne Wilder (Aurora De La Hoya), Judd Omen (Warren 'Dex' Dexter).
C-102m. Closed captioning.

by Andrea Passafiume
Seems Like Old Times

Seems Like Old Times

The 1980 romantic comedy Seems Like Old Times was the second and last pairing to date of stars Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase. The first time had been in the highly successful 1978 caper comedy Foul Play, which showed the stars' winning chemistry as an on-screen duo. In Seems Like Old Times, Chase plays Nick Gardenia, a writer who is kidnapped by two thugs and forced to rob a bank in California. Now a fugitive from justice, Nick hides out in the house of his ex-wife Glenda (Hawn), a soft-hearted defense lawyer whose new husband Ira (Charles Grodin) happens to be the District Attorney. With an original screenplay by the legendary Neil Simon and direction by television comedy master Jay Sandrich, the combination of talent in Seems Like Old Times is a can't-miss formula for laughs. Simon penned some of the most famous comedies on stage and screen including Plaza Suite, Barefoot in the Park and The Goodbye Girl to name just a few. Sandrich made his name directing classic television sitcoms such as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Bob Newhart Show and The Cosby Show. Goldie Hawn loved the script immediately for Seems Like Old Times, though the prolific Neil Simon can hardly remember writing it. He was churning out so much work at the time that he was admittedly on creative autopilot. In some ways, Seems Like Old Times is a throwback to classic Hollywood comedies like The Talk of the Town (1942), a Cary Grant/Jean Arthur/Ronald Colman movie with a similar plotline. Making Seems Like Old Times presented a personal challenge to Goldie Hawn. During the filming she was going through a divorce from Bill Hudson as well as juggling post-production demands on the movie she had just produced and starred in - Private Benjamin (1980). Even so, she managed to juggle everything successfully and make friends along the way. Co-star Charles Grodin remembered his time with Hawn fondly remarking what a good spirit she had on the set and how much she loved to laugh. Neil Simon called her "a rare combination. She can be very funny and very sexy. She has a true appreciation of what's funny and what's bleak in life."

Ray Stark (1915-2004)


Ray Stark, the celebrated Hollywood producer who opened the world for Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl (1968), and was a recipient of the distinguished Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Arts and Sciences for his services to the movie industry, died of natural causes on January 17th in Los Angeles. He was 88.

Born on October 3, 1915 in New York City, Stark was educated at Rutgers University and New York University Law School. After graduation, he started his entertainment career selling radio scripts before he became a literary agent for such notable writers as Ben Hecht, Thomas P. Costain, and Raymond Chandler. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Stark - who had show-business connections through his mother-in-law, Broadway legend Fanny Brice - eventually became a top Hollywood agent at Famous Artists, where he represented such stars as Marilyn Monroe, William Holden, Kirk Douglas, and Lana Turner.

By 1957, Stark was hungry to develop more of a taste in the film business, so he formed a partnership with fellow producer Elliott Hyman to create the independent movie firm, Seven Arts Productions. Stark's first film production credit was the popular drama The World of Suzie Wong (1960) starring William Holden and Nancy Kwan; and he followed that up with an adaptation of Tennessee Williams' superb Night of the Iguana (1964) with Richard Burton, Deborah Kerr and Ava Gardner.

Around this time, Stark had the ambition to produce a musical based on the life of his late mother-in-law, and produced his first Broadway musical - Funny Girl. The musical opened on March 24, 1964 and made Barbra Streisand the toast of the Great White Way. Eventually, Stark would make the film adaptation four years later, and Streisand would win the Academy Award for Best Actress. Stark would also arrange a contract with Streisand to do three more movies for him within the next 10 years that still prove to be the most interesting of her career: the hilarious sex farce The Owl and the Pussycat (1970) with George Segal; the romantic drama The Way We Were (1973) with Robert Redford; and the sequel to her film debut Funny Lady (1975) co-starring Omar Sharif.

Stark also delivered another Broadway luminary to the movie going masses when he brought a string of well-acted, Neil Simon comedies to the silver screen, most notably: The Goodbye Girl (1977) with Marsha Mason and Richard Dreyfuss (Oscar winner, Best Actor); The Sunshine Boys (1975) with Walter Matthau and George Burns (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actor); California Suite (1978) with Alan Alda, Michael Caine, and Dame Maggie Smith (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actress); the nostalgic Brighton Beach Memoirs (1986) with Blythe Danner; and Biloxi Blues (1988) with Matthew Broderick. He also produced Steel Magnolias (1989), with an ensemble cast that introduced audiences to a radiantly young Julia Roberts. In television, Stark won an Emmy award for the HBO's telefilm Barbarians at the Gate (1993). His last credit as a producer (at age 84) was the Harrison Ford picture Random Hearts (1999).

Although he never won an Academy Award, Stark earned the most prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award in 1980 and the David O. Selznick Lifetime Achievement Award from the Producers Guild of America in 1999. He is survived by his daughter, Wendy, and granddaughter, Allison.

by Michael T. Toole

Ray Stark (1915-2004)

Ray Stark, the celebrated Hollywood producer who opened the world for Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl (1968), and was a recipient of the distinguished Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Arts and Sciences for his services to the movie industry, died of natural causes on January 17th in Los Angeles. He was 88. Born on October 3, 1915 in New York City, Stark was educated at Rutgers University and New York University Law School. After graduation, he started his entertainment career selling radio scripts before he became a literary agent for such notable writers as Ben Hecht, Thomas P. Costain, and Raymond Chandler. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Stark - who had show-business connections through his mother-in-law, Broadway legend Fanny Brice - eventually became a top Hollywood agent at Famous Artists, where he represented such stars as Marilyn Monroe, William Holden, Kirk Douglas, and Lana Turner. By 1957, Stark was hungry to develop more of a taste in the film business, so he formed a partnership with fellow producer Elliott Hyman to create the independent movie firm, Seven Arts Productions. Stark's first film production credit was the popular drama The World of Suzie Wong (1960) starring William Holden and Nancy Kwan; and he followed that up with an adaptation of Tennessee Williams' superb Night of the Iguana (1964) with Richard Burton, Deborah Kerr and Ava Gardner. Around this time, Stark had the ambition to produce a musical based on the life of his late mother-in-law, and produced his first Broadway musical - Funny Girl. The musical opened on March 24, 1964 and made Barbra Streisand the toast of the Great White Way. Eventually, Stark would make the film adaptation four years later, and Streisand would win the Academy Award for Best Actress. Stark would also arrange a contract with Streisand to do three more movies for him within the next 10 years that still prove to be the most interesting of her career: the hilarious sex farce The Owl and the Pussycat (1970) with George Segal; the romantic drama The Way We Were (1973) with Robert Redford; and the sequel to her film debut Funny Lady (1975) co-starring Omar Sharif. Stark also delivered another Broadway luminary to the movie going masses when he brought a string of well-acted, Neil Simon comedies to the silver screen, most notably: The Goodbye Girl (1977) with Marsha Mason and Richard Dreyfuss (Oscar winner, Best Actor); The Sunshine Boys (1975) with Walter Matthau and George Burns (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actor); California Suite (1978) with Alan Alda, Michael Caine, and Dame Maggie Smith (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actress); the nostalgic Brighton Beach Memoirs (1986) with Blythe Danner; and Biloxi Blues (1988) with Matthew Broderick. He also produced Steel Magnolias (1989), with an ensemble cast that introduced audiences to a radiantly young Julia Roberts. In television, Stark won an Emmy award for the HBO's telefilm Barbarians at the Gate (1993). His last credit as a producer (at age 84) was the Harrison Ford picture Random Hearts (1999). Although he never won an Academy Award, Stark earned the most prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award in 1980 and the David O. Selznick Lifetime Achievement Award from the Producers Guild of America in 1999. He is survived by his daughter, Wendy, and granddaughter, Allison. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 1980

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1980

Released in United States December 1980

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1980