A Place for Lovers


1h 28m 1969
A Place for Lovers

Brief Synopsis

An American fashion designer with a fatal disease falls for an Italian engineer.

Film Details

Also Known As
Amanti, Temps des amants
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Jan 1969
Premiere Information
New York opening: 22 Aug 1969
Production Company
C. C. Champion; Les Films Concordia
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Amanti by Brunello Rondi, Renaldo Cabieri (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)

Synopsis

Julia, an American divorcée and fashion designer, moves into a sumptuously furnished villa near Venice lent her by a friend. She turns on the television set and watches an interview with an Italian engineer. Recognizing the man as Valerio, a stranger who once stopped her at an airport, gently declared his infatuation, and then gave her his calling card, Julia impulsively telephones him and asks him to visit her at the villa. Elated by the invitation, Valerio drives all night, and before the morning is over he and Julia have become lovers. Other guests arrive at the villa that night and join in such hedonistic pleasures as a slide show of erotic art and an orgy. Valerio becomes disgusted at Julia's compliance and drives off. The next day Julia goes to an autodrome where Valerio is testing a new racing car accident-prevention device and persuades him to take her to the Italian Alps. Resuming their affair in the intimacy of an Alpine chalet, the couple are idyllically happy, although Julia reveals little about herself and shows little interest in Valerio's future plans. Eventually, Julia is traced to the chalet by Maggie, her friend and business associate, who informs Valerio that Julia is terminally ill and should be hospitalized so that morphine can ease the pain that will come with the final throes of her illness. Julia runs away, intent on suicide, but Valerio follows her to the heights of a nearby mountain and commits an act of faith by asking her to drive their jeep back to the chalet. Though she speeds off at a furious pace that could kill them both, she steers to avoid an impending crash and then asks Valerio to take the wheel. The split-second decision brings Julia the strength to finally accept her illness as well as the love offered to her by Valerio.

Film Details

Also Known As
Amanti, Temps des amants
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Jan 1969
Premiere Information
New York opening: 22 Aug 1969
Production Company
C. C. Champion; Les Films Concordia
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Amanti by Brunello Rondi, Renaldo Cabieri (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)

Articles

A Place for Lovers -


Faye Dunaway and Marcello Mastroianni co-starred in A Place for Lovers (1968), directed by Vittorio De Sica. The film was shot on location at various locations in Italy, including Cinecittà Studios in Rome, Veneto and Milan.

Written by Julian Zimet, Peter Baldwin, Ennio De Concini, Tonino Guerra and Cesare Zavattini, A Place for Lovers (original title: Amanti) was an adaptation of an Italian play by Brunello Rondi. Julia (Dunaway), an American fashion designer, goes to Venice and falls in love with a dashing Italian engineer, Valerio (Mastroianni). After initially rebuffing his advances, she eventually gives in and the two embark on a torrid affair. Valerio is overwhelmed by Julia and breaks off the relationship, and then learns the real reason why she was so determined to grab everything life could offer - she's terminally ill.

When they appeared together, Mastroianni had long been an international star and Dunaway was the hot actress in Hollywood, thanks to Bonnie and Clyde (1967). Dunaway later wrote in her autobiography that she had seen Mastroianni in Federico Fellini's film 8 ½ (1963) and considered him one of the greatest actors of her time. Because of that, she gave up a role in Paint Your Wagon (1969) "but I thought that this might be my only chance to work with Marcello, and I had to at least give the project serious consideration." During filming, a reporter came on the set and asked Dunaway what it was like to play a love scene with Mastroianni. She told him that actors always fell in love with their co-stars when they were working together. "And that is when I fell in love with Marcello, in a scene early in the movie when the two of us have our first romantic encounter." Although Dunaway had always wanted to avoid romances with her co-stars, she couldn't help herself. Despite Mastroianni being married (although long separated), and the two had to speak in French, since he was not fluent in English, they began a love affair that lasted for two years.

The film was released in Italy on December 19, 1968 and debuted in the United States on August 22, 1969, where neither Dunaway's star status nor two songs by the great Ella Fitzgerald could save it. Roger Ebert, writing for The Chicago Sun-Times dubbed it the "most godawful piece of pseudo-romantic slop I've ever seen! [...] One goes to this movie in the same spirit one visits an ancient town buried by lava centuries ago: To try to determine by examining the ruins what made the gods punish man so."

SOURCES:

Dunaway, Faye Looking for Gatsby
http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/a-place-for-lovers-1969
The Internet Movie Database
http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/375/A-Place-for-Lovers/

By Lorraine LoBianco
A Place For Lovers -

A Place for Lovers -

Faye Dunaway and Marcello Mastroianni co-starred in A Place for Lovers (1968), directed by Vittorio De Sica. The film was shot on location at various locations in Italy, including Cinecittà Studios in Rome, Veneto and Milan. Written by Julian Zimet, Peter Baldwin, Ennio De Concini, Tonino Guerra and Cesare Zavattini, A Place for Lovers (original title: Amanti) was an adaptation of an Italian play by Brunello Rondi. Julia (Dunaway), an American fashion designer, goes to Venice and falls in love with a dashing Italian engineer, Valerio (Mastroianni). After initially rebuffing his advances, she eventually gives in and the two embark on a torrid affair. Valerio is overwhelmed by Julia and breaks off the relationship, and then learns the real reason why she was so determined to grab everything life could offer - she's terminally ill. When they appeared together, Mastroianni had long been an international star and Dunaway was the hot actress in Hollywood, thanks to Bonnie and Clyde (1967). Dunaway later wrote in her autobiography that she had seen Mastroianni in Federico Fellini's film 8 ½ (1963) and considered him one of the greatest actors of her time. Because of that, she gave up a role in Paint Your Wagon (1969) "but I thought that this might be my only chance to work with Marcello, and I had to at least give the project serious consideration." During filming, a reporter came on the set and asked Dunaway what it was like to play a love scene with Mastroianni. She told him that actors always fell in love with their co-stars when they were working together. "And that is when I fell in love with Marcello, in a scene early in the movie when the two of us have our first romantic encounter." Although Dunaway had always wanted to avoid romances with her co-stars, she couldn't help herself. Despite Mastroianni being married (although long separated), and the two had to speak in French, since he was not fluent in English, they began a love affair that lasted for two years. The film was released in Italy on December 19, 1968 and debuted in the United States on August 22, 1969, where neither Dunaway's star status nor two songs by the great Ella Fitzgerald could save it. Roger Ebert, writing for The Chicago Sun-Times dubbed it the "most godawful piece of pseudo-romantic slop I've ever seen! [...] One goes to this movie in the same spirit one visits an ancient town buried by lava centuries ago: To try to determine by examining the ruins what made the gods punish man so." SOURCES: Dunaway, Faye Looking for Gatsby http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/a-place-for-lovers-1969 The Internet Movie Database http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/375/A-Place-for-Lovers/ By Lorraine LoBianco

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

A Place for Lovers was released in Italy in 1968 as Amanti and opened in Paris in September 1969 as Le temps des amants. Although Julian Halevy was given co-credit for the screenplay when the film was initially released, according to official WGA records, Halevy was a pseudonym for writer Julian Zimet. The WGA changed the screenplay credit to read: "Screenplay by Julian Zimet and Peter Baldwin and Ennio de Concini and Tonino Guerra and Cesare Zavattini. Story by Brunello Rondi." Italian sources credit Vittorio De Sica as an additional screenplay writer.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 1969

Released in United States Summer August 1969