Love


1h 22m 1927
Love

Brief Synopsis

In this updated, silent adaptation of Anna Karenina, a married woman sacrifices everything for the love of a military officer.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Silent
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jan 2, 1927
Premiere Information
New York premiere: 29 Nov 1927
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Anna Karénina by Leo Tolstoy (Moscow, 1876).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 22m
Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
7,365ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Anna Karenina, the wife of a Russian nobleman, falls in love with Vronsky, a young officer, forfeiting her right to her child. Realizing her tragic fate and the futility of her existence, she commits suicide by throwing herself in front of a moving train.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Silent
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jan 2, 1927
Premiere Information
New York premiere: 29 Nov 1927
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Anna Karénina by Leo Tolstoy (Moscow, 1876).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 22m
Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
7,365ft (8 reels)

Articles

Love (1927)


Greta Garbo took on Hollywood's biggest studio and won her case before she would set foot on the set of Love, the 1927 adaptation of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. Not only did she get MGM to raise her salary, but through a carefully timed "illness," she even got them to give her the leading man she wanted.

Although Garbo had been at MGM for just two years, in which time she had only had two films released, she knew she was worth more than the $600 a week her current contract gave her. She had scored solid reviews and strong box office with her first two American films. As studio publicists raved about her torrid love scenes with John Gilbert in the still unreleased Flesh and the Devil, and gossip about their offscreen romance spread, her fan mail began to approach her leading man's 5,000 letters a week.

At Gilbert's urging -- they were living together at the time -- she campaigned for a new contract to start at $5,000 a week. Instead, studio head Louis B. Mayer simply informed her that she was to start work on an adaptation of Anna Karenina co-starring Ricardo Cortez and Lionel Barrymore and directed by Dmitri Buchowetsky. Only Garbo wouldn't report to work. Mayer put her on suspension, threatened to have her deported, threatened to replace her with a look-alike and even threatened to burn off her current contract with minor roles. But she just laughed him off, countering that if she had to she could stay in the U.S. by marrying Gilbert, whom Mayer hated.

Then MGM released Flesh and the Devil, which turned out to be Garbo's biggest hit to date. Realizing that he needed the independent star more than she needed him, Mayer finally agreed on a contract raising her salary to $2,000 a week, increasing to $4,000 the second year, $5,000 the third and $6,000 the fourth. And still it wasn't enough. The new contract wasn't supposed to kick in until Anna Karenina was completed, so Garbo got sick -- too sick to report to work for a month. And she won again, convincing Mayer to backdate the contract to the beginning of the year.

Conveniently, Garbo's return to work coincided with the completion of Gilbert's latest picture. With the tremendous box-office reaction to their teaming, Thalberg decided to replace Cortez with Gilbert. In addition, he brought on Edmund Goulding, already famous for his ability to showcase female stars, to direct. With the new team, Thalberg decided to change the film's title to something reflecting the star pairing. Someone suggested Heat, but that would have resulted in marquees reading "John Gilbert and Greta Garbo in Heat." Instead, he called the picture Love, using the tag line, "John Gilbert and Greta Garbo in Love....What more could be said about a picture -- see it."

And that's just what the public did. The film scored solidly at the box office, despite mixed notices. Most of the reviewers found the film rather one-sided, putting all the focus on Garbo at the expense of the other performers. This was tempered by their delight in Garbo's work. Mordaunt Hall in the New York Times said "Greta Garbo, the Swedish actress, outshines any other performance she has given on the screen" and called her "a blonde Mona Lisa." Variety used language that seems rather inappropriate today in light of what Garbo's career would become; they called her "the biggest skirt prospect now in pictures."

One element helping the film's box office was the addition of a happy ending that reunited Anna and Vronsky after her husband's death. At least it helped outside the major American cities, where this rather original take on Tolstoy's story played like gangbusters. For the major U.S. cities and Europe, however, the film kept the novel's original ending, with Garbo throwing herself in front of a train - the same ending that would be used when Garbo re-made the film, with Fredric March in the lead, in 1935. For this TCM presentation, both endings will be shown, giving viewers a chance to decide for themselves how Anna's tortured romance should have ended.

Producer & Director: Edmund Goulding
Screenplay: Frances Marion, Lorna Moon
Titles: Marian Ainslee, Ruth Cummings
Based on the novel Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Cinematography: William H. Daniels
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Alexander Toluboff
Score: Howard Dietz, Walter Donaldson, Ernst Luz Principal Cast: Greta Garbo (Anna Karenina), John Gilbert (Vronsky), George Fawcett (Grand Duke), Emily Fitzroy (Grand Duchess), Brandon Hurst (Karenin), Philippe De Lacy (Serezha, the Child).
BW-83m.

by Frank Miller
Love (1927)

Love (1927)

Greta Garbo took on Hollywood's biggest studio and won her case before she would set foot on the set of Love, the 1927 adaptation of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. Not only did she get MGM to raise her salary, but through a carefully timed "illness," she even got them to give her the leading man she wanted. Although Garbo had been at MGM for just two years, in which time she had only had two films released, she knew she was worth more than the $600 a week her current contract gave her. She had scored solid reviews and strong box office with her first two American films. As studio publicists raved about her torrid love scenes with John Gilbert in the still unreleased Flesh and the Devil, and gossip about their offscreen romance spread, her fan mail began to approach her leading man's 5,000 letters a week. At Gilbert's urging -- they were living together at the time -- she campaigned for a new contract to start at $5,000 a week. Instead, studio head Louis B. Mayer simply informed her that she was to start work on an adaptation of Anna Karenina co-starring Ricardo Cortez and Lionel Barrymore and directed by Dmitri Buchowetsky. Only Garbo wouldn't report to work. Mayer put her on suspension, threatened to have her deported, threatened to replace her with a look-alike and even threatened to burn off her current contract with minor roles. But she just laughed him off, countering that if she had to she could stay in the U.S. by marrying Gilbert, whom Mayer hated. Then MGM released Flesh and the Devil, which turned out to be Garbo's biggest hit to date. Realizing that he needed the independent star more than she needed him, Mayer finally agreed on a contract raising her salary to $2,000 a week, increasing to $4,000 the second year, $5,000 the third and $6,000 the fourth. And still it wasn't enough. The new contract wasn't supposed to kick in until Anna Karenina was completed, so Garbo got sick -- too sick to report to work for a month. And she won again, convincing Mayer to backdate the contract to the beginning of the year. Conveniently, Garbo's return to work coincided with the completion of Gilbert's latest picture. With the tremendous box-office reaction to their teaming, Thalberg decided to replace Cortez with Gilbert. In addition, he brought on Edmund Goulding, already famous for his ability to showcase female stars, to direct. With the new team, Thalberg decided to change the film's title to something reflecting the star pairing. Someone suggested Heat, but that would have resulted in marquees reading "John Gilbert and Greta Garbo in Heat." Instead, he called the picture Love, using the tag line, "John Gilbert and Greta Garbo in Love....What more could be said about a picture -- see it." And that's just what the public did. The film scored solidly at the box office, despite mixed notices. Most of the reviewers found the film rather one-sided, putting all the focus on Garbo at the expense of the other performers. This was tempered by their delight in Garbo's work. Mordaunt Hall in the New York Times said "Greta Garbo, the Swedish actress, outshines any other performance she has given on the screen" and called her "a blonde Mona Lisa." Variety used language that seems rather inappropriate today in light of what Garbo's career would become; they called her "the biggest skirt prospect now in pictures." One element helping the film's box office was the addition of a happy ending that reunited Anna and Vronsky after her husband's death. At least it helped outside the major American cities, where this rather original take on Tolstoy's story played like gangbusters. For the major U.S. cities and Europe, however, the film kept the novel's original ending, with Garbo throwing herself in front of a train - the same ending that would be used when Garbo re-made the film, with Fredric March in the lead, in 1935. For this TCM presentation, both endings will be shown, giving viewers a chance to decide for themselves how Anna's tortured romance should have ended. Producer & Director: Edmund Goulding Screenplay: Frances Marion, Lorna Moon Titles: Marian Ainslee, Ruth Cummings Based on the novel Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy Cinematography: William H. Daniels Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Alexander Toluboff Score: Howard Dietz, Walter Donaldson, Ernst Luz Principal Cast: Greta Garbo (Anna Karenina), John Gilbert (Vronsky), George Fawcett (Grand Duke), Emily Fitzroy (Grand Duchess), Brandon Hurst (Karenin), Philippe De Lacy (Serezha, the Child). BW-83m. by Frank Miller

Mad Love at Atlanta's Plaza Theatre - Atlanta's Plaza Theatre Revives The Lost Art of the Spook Show and Much More!


Attention! Atlanta, Georgia residents, if you are a movie lover and have a fondness for cult movies and the Spook Show extravaganzas you saw as a kid, you owe it to yourself to check out the Plaza Cinema at 1049 Ponce De Leon. It is the only true independent cinema left in the city and, in addition to its regular schedule of new and first run features, it often programs repertory titles as special events. Here is the link to their web site so you can get an idea of what is coming up and what you've been missing.
Plaza Theatre.

One of the most popular events the Plaza hosts is Professor Morte's Silver Scream Spookshow which has recently presented such fantasy favorites in 35mm on the big screen as the 1933 King Kong, Edward Cahn's The Zombies of Mora-Tau (1957), Boris Karloff in Frankenstein (1931) and 20 Million Miles to Earth (1957) featuring special effects by Ray Harryhausen. Next at THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW, another 35mm archive print from the Warner Brothers vault.... MAD LOVE starring the amazing PETER LORRE! Saturday Feb 23rd with a 1:00pm kiddie matinee price of $6 and 10:00pm late show price of $10. Plus!!! Special 3 STOOGES episode "We Want Our Mummy!" before the feature!

Here is some information about Professor Morte, host of THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW, taken from his MySpace page:
"Professor Morte has been performing for most of his afterlife in various parts of the world. He originally hails from Transylvania but was chased out of town after an "incident". What exactly happened is unknown as there were no survivors.He entertained throughout the late 1930's and 50's becoming the world's first horror host. While he may have spawned several imitations, there was only one true Spook Show. These imitations were laughable at first but soon the public grew tired of their half-rate performances and before long the spook show was sadly buried. Leaving only fond memories for those who were lucky enough to see a "real spook, live on stage!!" Until now there had only been was Coney Island , one would think that a place synonymous with freaks would welcome the likes of Morte and his band of creeps but their hearts simply could not take it and he was run out of town yet again. Years past as he searched for the perfect venue for his theater of the macabre, thats when he stumbled upon THE PLAZA THEATER in Atlanta. Never before had he seen such a place begging for his particular brand of creepertainment. So after digging up (quite literally) a fresh troop of ghouls THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW was resurrected. You never know quite what to expect at a S.S.S.S. Morte could summon ghastly ghosts that swarm over the audience,s heads, Pregnant Women could get sawed in half(2 4 1), hot ghoul on ghoul action from Blast Off Blast Off Burlesque and people have been know to win their very own and very real DEAD BODY. More than likely those who used to stay up into the wee hours of the morning, just to catch a glimpse of their favorite monsters now have children of their own. Morte knows the little ones'hearts are very fragile and puts on a special kid's matinee. So hold on to the seat of your pants and buy a ticket or three to THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW!"

The Plaza Theatre is also host to Splatter Cinema, a local film club that programs cult horror films on Tuesday nights occasionally. The most recent screening on Feb. 12 showcased I Drink Your Blood (1971), a notorious drive-in favorite in which a band of satanist hippies roll into a town and begin terrorizing the local folk. They rape a local girl and her grandpa goes after them. He fails and is given LSD. This bothers his grandson and he gets back at the hippies by feeding them meat pies infected with blood from a rabid dog. They turn into crazed lunatics and begin killing and/or infecting everything in their path. At the screening some audience members turned up with foaming mouths and wearing hardhats like the crazed construction workers in the film's demented climax. Previous Splatter Cinema screenings have included Herschell Gordon Lewis's Blood Feast (1963), John Carpenter's version of The Thing (1982) and Dario Argento's Suspiria (1977).

The Splatter Cinema folks proclaim that the Plaza is "the one place in Atlanta where you can see human bodies ripped from limb to limb, intestines thrown about like streamers, and eyeballs in your popcorn. Our films are not DVD's - we proudly feature ONLY 35mm prints of these splatter classics in a REAL GRINDHOUSE theater!"

So spread the word and help keep repertory cinema alive in Atlanta!

Mad Love at Atlanta's Plaza Theatre - Atlanta's Plaza Theatre Revives The Lost Art of the Spook Show and Much More!

Attention! Atlanta, Georgia residents, if you are a movie lover and have a fondness for cult movies and the Spook Show extravaganzas you saw as a kid, you owe it to yourself to check out the Plaza Cinema at 1049 Ponce De Leon. It is the only true independent cinema left in the city and, in addition to its regular schedule of new and first run features, it often programs repertory titles as special events. Here is the link to their web site so you can get an idea of what is coming up and what you've been missing. Plaza Theatre. One of the most popular events the Plaza hosts is Professor Morte's Silver Scream Spookshow which has recently presented such fantasy favorites in 35mm on the big screen as the 1933 King Kong, Edward Cahn's The Zombies of Mora-Tau (1957), Boris Karloff in Frankenstein (1931) and 20 Million Miles to Earth (1957) featuring special effects by Ray Harryhausen. Next at THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW, another 35mm archive print from the Warner Brothers vault.... MAD LOVE starring the amazing PETER LORRE! Saturday Feb 23rd with a 1:00pm kiddie matinee price of $6 and 10:00pm late show price of $10. Plus!!! Special 3 STOOGES episode "We Want Our Mummy!" before the feature! Here is some information about Professor Morte, host of THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW, taken from his MySpace page: "Professor Morte has been performing for most of his afterlife in various parts of the world. He originally hails from Transylvania but was chased out of town after an "incident". What exactly happened is unknown as there were no survivors.He entertained throughout the late 1930's and 50's becoming the world's first horror host. While he may have spawned several imitations, there was only one true Spook Show. These imitations were laughable at first but soon the public grew tired of their half-rate performances and before long the spook show was sadly buried. Leaving only fond memories for those who were lucky enough to see a "real spook, live on stage!!" Until now there had only been was Coney Island , one would think that a place synonymous with freaks would welcome the likes of Morte and his band of creeps but their hearts simply could not take it and he was run out of town yet again. Years past as he searched for the perfect venue for his theater of the macabre, thats when he stumbled upon THE PLAZA THEATER in Atlanta. Never before had he seen such a place begging for his particular brand of creepertainment. So after digging up (quite literally) a fresh troop of ghouls THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW was resurrected. You never know quite what to expect at a S.S.S.S. Morte could summon ghastly ghosts that swarm over the audience,s heads, Pregnant Women could get sawed in half(2 4 1), hot ghoul on ghoul action from Blast Off Blast Off Burlesque and people have been know to win their very own and very real DEAD BODY. More than likely those who used to stay up into the wee hours of the morning, just to catch a glimpse of their favorite monsters now have children of their own. Morte knows the little ones'hearts are very fragile and puts on a special kid's matinee. So hold on to the seat of your pants and buy a ticket or three to THE SILVER SCREAM SPOOK SHOW!" The Plaza Theatre is also host to Splatter Cinema, a local film club that programs cult horror films on Tuesday nights occasionally. The most recent screening on Feb. 12 showcased I Drink Your Blood (1971), a notorious drive-in favorite in which a band of satanist hippies roll into a town and begin terrorizing the local folk. They rape a local girl and her grandpa goes after them. He fails and is given LSD. This bothers his grandson and he gets back at the hippies by feeding them meat pies infected with blood from a rabid dog. They turn into crazed lunatics and begin killing and/or infecting everything in their path. At the screening some audience members turned up with foaming mouths and wearing hardhats like the crazed construction workers in the film's demented climax. Previous Splatter Cinema screenings have included Herschell Gordon Lewis's Blood Feast (1963), John Carpenter's version of The Thing (1982) and Dario Argento's Suspiria (1977). The Splatter Cinema folks proclaim that the Plaza is "the one place in Atlanta where you can see human bodies ripped from limb to limb, intestines thrown about like streamers, and eyeballs in your popcorn. Our films are not DVD's - we proudly feature ONLY 35mm prints of these splatter classics in a REAL GRINDHOUSE theater!" So spread the word and help keep repertory cinema alive in Atlanta!

Quotes

Trivia

MGM reportedly filmed both happy and unhappy endings for the film. The happy version was for American audiences, and the tragic version was distributed internationally. Both endings are shown in the Turner Classic Movies alternate version.

Notes

In an alternative ending Anna and Vronsky are happily reunited three years later, after her husband's opportune death. Greta Garbo recreated the role of "Anna" for the 1935 M-G-M production Anna Karénina, directed by Clarence Brown and co-starring Fredric March as "Vronsky." For information on other screen adaptations of Leo Tolstoy's novel, please consult the entry for that film in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1927

Released in United States March 1977

Released in United States 1927

Released in United States March 1977 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Double Vision-Two different classics made from the same story) March 9-27, 1977.)