Dead and Buried


1h 32m 1982

Brief Synopsis

Citizens of a small town believe a series of murders have been committed by the eccentric local coroner.

Film Details

Also Known As
Dead & Buried
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Synopsis

Citizens of a small town believe a series of murders have been committed by the eccentric local coroner.

Crew

Andrew Ackerman

Assistant Director

Ross Albert

Associate Editor

Joe Aubel

Art Director

Alan Balsam

Editor

Dennis Barton

Set Decorator

Dustin Bernard

Production Assistant

Dominick Bruno

Props

Dixie J Capp

Production Coordinator

Tony Cecere

Stunts

Jan Cook

Hair

Bill Couch

Stunts

Bill Couch

Stunt Coordinator

Bill Couch

Stunts

Charles Couch

Stunts

Angelo Demeo

Stunts

Gordon Ecker

Sound Effects Editor

Zoltan Elek

Makeup

Robert Fentress

Producer

Nancy Forner

Assistant Editor

Linda Francis

Casting

Brian E Frankish

Assistant Director

Ziggy Geike

Wig Supplier

Alvin Greenman

Script Supervisor

Bill Hansard

Other

Robert L Harman

Sound

Edouard F Henriques

Makeup

John W. Hyde

Production Supervisor

Walla Works Inc

Sound Effects Editor

Bill Jobe

Costumes

James Kagel

Art Department

John Koester

Camera Operator

Toni Lemos

Location Coordinator

Elliot Marks

Photography

William Mccaughey

Sound

Murray Mcfadden

Sound

Anthony R Milch

Sound Editor

Jeffrey Miller

From Story

Ken Miller

Key Grip

Kate Morris

Other

Ty Nutt

Dialogue Coach

Dan O'bannon

Screenplay

William P. Owens

Unit Production Manager

Erica Edell Phillips

Costume Supervisor

Steve Poster

Director Of Photography

Vincent Prentice

Makeup

Michael I Rachmil

Associate Producer

William Randall

Sound

Joe Renzetti

Music

Richard D Rogers

Sound

William Sandell

Art Director

Robert Shasett

Screenplay

Robert Shusett

Producer

Richard R St Johns

Executive Producer

Alex Stern

From Story

Scott Ira Thaler

Assistant Director

Jack Tillar

Music Editor

James E Tocci

Set Designer

Stan Winston

Makeup

Howard Wollman

Sound

Film Details

Also Known As
Dead & Buried
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Articles

Dead and Buried


One of the horror genre's most atmospheric domains is that sleepy and small town where things just aren't quite what they seem. Bodega Bay, California, added coastal splendor to the backdrop of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds (1963) and also John Carpenter's The Fog (1980). Still within California, Mendocino added more coastal creepiness to The Dunwich Horror (1970), Cujo (1983), and Dead & Buried (1981). This latter film deserves special mention here because it made a memorable impact on many horror fans who never quite understood how such a chilling story, one that combined the talents of Alien scribes Ronald Shusett and Dan O'Bannon along with the special effects talents of Stan Winston (who would further terrify horror fans a year later with his work on Carpenter's The Thing), could be so criminally overlooked by what seemed like everybody except the British (who added it to their British video nasties hysteria), or the Norwegians (who banned it). The film was directed by Gary A. Sherman, whose film Raw Meat (1972, aka: Death Line) is a personal favorite of staunch horror genre enthusiast and director Guillermo del Toro.

Dead & Buried has tv movie veteran James Farentino in a star turn as the local sheriff of Potters Bluff, a picturesque town that could be said to be idyllic if not for the fact that tourists get brutally murdered by the townsfolk only to reappear later as newly absorbed members of the community. Are the dead coming back to life and is the town filling up with zombies? Or is it a conspiracy along the lines of The Stepford Wives? Or could there even be an element of swapping out one identity for a second chance as something else, as with another coastally located film (Malibu) like Frankenheimer's Seconds? If any of those films grab your fancy, or even if you're just a fan of Six Feet Under, there are plenty of pleasures to be had in Dead & Buried - a film that ambitiously tries to revamp several genre ideas with a serious tone that is further anchored by Farantino's empathetic performance. Also sure to raise eyebrows is Jack Albertson, known to so many as Grandpa Joe in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, here taking on a decidedly different role in the corpse factory known as Potters Bluff.

Dead & Buried finally makes its dvd debut courtesy of Blue Underground, who pack the main disc with three audio commentaries along with theatrical trailers and a poster/still gallery and also include a bonus disc with nods toward special effects wizard Stan Winston, supporting role actor Robert Englund, and scriptwriter Dan O'Bannon, who makes some interesting observations about how "fear is a sensitizing emotion" and talks about his passion for H. P. Lovecraft. In reference to one of many flinch-inducing scenes wherein a person gets injected in the eye, O'Bannon confesses that "I don't enjoy eyeball mutilation scenes - maybe someday I'll come around." Thankfully, at least this dvd finally came around and, yes, it's been a long wait for fans of this memorable and creepy film, but the wait has finally paid off with more dividends than you can shake a hypodermic needle at.

For more information about Dead and Buried, visit Blue Underground. To order Dead and Buried, go to TCM Shopping.

by Pablo Kjolseth
Dead And Buried

Dead and Buried

One of the horror genre's most atmospheric domains is that sleepy and small town where things just aren't quite what they seem. Bodega Bay, California, added coastal splendor to the backdrop of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds (1963) and also John Carpenter's The Fog (1980). Still within California, Mendocino added more coastal creepiness to The Dunwich Horror (1970), Cujo (1983), and Dead & Buried (1981). This latter film deserves special mention here because it made a memorable impact on many horror fans who never quite understood how such a chilling story, one that combined the talents of Alien scribes Ronald Shusett and Dan O'Bannon along with the special effects talents of Stan Winston (who would further terrify horror fans a year later with his work on Carpenter's The Thing), could be so criminally overlooked by what seemed like everybody except the British (who added it to their British video nasties hysteria), or the Norwegians (who banned it). The film was directed by Gary A. Sherman, whose film Raw Meat (1972, aka: Death Line) is a personal favorite of staunch horror genre enthusiast and director Guillermo del Toro. Dead & Buried has tv movie veteran James Farentino in a star turn as the local sheriff of Potters Bluff, a picturesque town that could be said to be idyllic if not for the fact that tourists get brutally murdered by the townsfolk only to reappear later as newly absorbed members of the community. Are the dead coming back to life and is the town filling up with zombies? Or is it a conspiracy along the lines of The Stepford Wives? Or could there even be an element of swapping out one identity for a second chance as something else, as with another coastally located film (Malibu) like Frankenheimer's Seconds? If any of those films grab your fancy, or even if you're just a fan of Six Feet Under, there are plenty of pleasures to be had in Dead & Buried - a film that ambitiously tries to revamp several genre ideas with a serious tone that is further anchored by Farantino's empathetic performance. Also sure to raise eyebrows is Jack Albertson, known to so many as Grandpa Joe in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, here taking on a decidedly different role in the corpse factory known as Potters Bluff. Dead & Buried finally makes its dvd debut courtesy of Blue Underground, who pack the main disc with three audio commentaries along with theatrical trailers and a poster/still gallery and also include a bonus disc with nods toward special effects wizard Stan Winston, supporting role actor Robert Englund, and scriptwriter Dan O'Bannon, who makes some interesting observations about how "fear is a sensitizing emotion" and talks about his passion for H. P. Lovecraft. In reference to one of many flinch-inducing scenes wherein a person gets injected in the eye, O'Bannon confesses that "I don't enjoy eyeball mutilation scenes - maybe someday I'll come around." Thankfully, at least this dvd finally came around and, yes, it's been a long wait for fans of this memorable and creepy film, but the wait has finally paid off with more dividends than you can shake a hypodermic needle at. For more information about Dead and Buried, visit Blue Underground. To order Dead and Buried, go to TCM Shopping. by Pablo Kjolseth

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1982

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1982