The Hudsucker Proxy


1h 55m 1994
The Hudsucker Proxy

Brief Synopsis

A corrupt executive tries to control his company by appointing a small-town boob to replace the president.

Photos & Videos

The Hudsucker Proxy - Movie Poster

Film Details

Also Known As
Hudsucker Proxy, Strebern, gran salto, El
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Period
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Wilmington, North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Synopsis

Set in New York circa 1958, a man quickly climbs his way up the corporate ladder at a conglomerate after starting in the mail room. He reaches the position of chairman after the boss takes a dive out the window.

Crew

Tammy Adams

Set Costumer

Sarah Addington

Assistant Director

Larry Albright

Miniatures

Joseph B Alexander

Other

William Allen

Grip

J. Todd Anderson

Storyboard Artist

Steve Arnold

Assistant Art Director

Bruce Atwater

Grip

Paige Augustine

On-Set Dresser

Matt Barry

Casting Associate

Kip Bartlett

On-Set Dresser

Heather Barton

Production Assistant

Eric G Bartsch

Dolly Grip

Ryan Bartsch

Dolly Grip

Logan Berkshire

Key Grip

Tim Bevan

Executive Producer

Georges Bizet

Song

Jean Black

Makeup

Michael Bonisgnore

Grip

Jim Bridges

Photography

Mark Bridges

Costume Designer

Stephen Brock

Electrician

Michael Brockman

Driver

Robin Brown

Camera Assistant

Susan Buffington

Hair

Ray Bulinski

Craft Service

Grace Bumbry

Song Performer

Richard Burton

Other

Carter Burwell

Music

Allan Byer

Sound Mixer

Kristina R Byrd

Assistant Camera Operator

Steve Caines

Production Assistant

Scott Canfield

Electrician

Susan L Carpenter

Set Production Assistant

Jean Marie Carroll

Other

Sean Casey

Visual Effects

Linda Cathey

On-Set Dresser

Kurt Charfield

Other

Emile Charlap

Music Contractor

Peter Chesney

Mechanical Special Effects

Thomas C Chesney

Other

Edmund Choi

Assistant

Calvin Cin

Transportation Captain

Eden Clark-coblenz

Assistant

Terri Clemens

Unit Manager

Lauren Coccia

Art Assistant

Ethan Coen

Screenplay

Ethan Coen

Producer

Joel Coen

Screenplay

Steve Cohagan

Best Boy

Richard L Cohen

Matte Painter

Luis Colina

Editor

Thomas C Cook

Grip

Tricia Cooke

Camera Assistant

Tricia Cooke

Assistant Editor

John Copeman

Stunts

Mary Corcoran

Visual Effects

Cydney Cornell

Hairdresser

Kirk Corwin

Property Master

Marko Costanzo

Foley

Christopher Cowan

Visual Effects

Gina B Cranham

Set Designer

Kelly Dale Curry

Electrician

Joe D'alessandro

Camera Assistant

George Davis

Medic

Jim M Davis

Construction Coordinator

Sandra D Dawes

Casting

Roger Deakins

Dp/Cinematographer

Roger Deakins

Director Of Photography

Dick Deangelo

Transportation Coordinator

Lynda Dedmon

Driver

Richard Dehr

Song

Nick Dibeneditto

Negative Cutting

Louis Dicesare

Gaffer

Lee Dichter

Rerecording

Louis F Difelice

Production Coordinator

David Diliberto

Other

Kat Dillon

Coproducer

Lynn Dodson

Electrician

Glenn E Doell

Other

Bruce Donnellan

Other

Patrick Dorman

Assistant

Lisa A Doyle

Set Costumer

Richard Eliano

Assistant Camera Operator

Duke Ellington

Song

Duke Ellington

Song Performer

Paul Elliott

Dp/Cinematographer

Paul Elliott

Director Of Photography

Tony Fanning

Set Designer

Michael Farrow

Music

Wesley Fata

Choreographer

Eric Fellner

Executive Producer

Chris Fielder

Sound

Robert Finley Iii

Gaffer

Brian Fitzsimons

Dolly Grip

Carol A Ellison Fleming

Assistant Editor

Brian Fong

Props Assistant

Richard Ford

Rigging Gaffer

David Freund

Visual Effects

David Fuhrer

Visual Effects

Peter Gallagher

Song Performer

Dennis Gamiello

Key Grip

Dennis Gassner

Production Designer

Claire Gaul

On-Set Dresser

Eugene Gearty

Editor

Karen Ruth Getchell

Assistant Production Coordinator

Leila Gilbert

Visual Effects

Terry Gilkyson

Song

Chris Gilmer

Production Coordinator

Peter Girolami

Best Boy

Cathie Hegler Godwin

Driver

Rob Goldman

Office Assistant

Henry Gonzales

Other

Roy Goode

Visual Effects

Benny Goodman And His Orchestra

Song

Chris Gorak

Other

Rufus Granger

Dolly Grip

Mark D Graves

Electrician

Ron Gress

Visual Effects

Tom Griep

Visual Effects

Robert J Grindrod

Production Accountant

Nancy Haigh

Set Decorator

Bruce Hamme

Dolly Grip

Lionel Hampton

Song

Peter Hanson

Visual Effects

Russell W Hardee

Grip

Sarkis Hardy

Visual Effects

Gerald Dwayne Hatchell

Grip

Todd Hatfield

Other

Peter Hawkins

Other

Maggie Hayes

Other

Joe Heffernan

Other

Billy Bob Hendricks

Electrician

Jim Hensz

Set Production Assistant

Don Hewitt

Stunts

Jery Hewitt

Stunts

Jery Hewitt

Stunt Coordinator

Tammy High

Accountant

Adam Hill

Visual Effects

Tom Hinson

Key Rigging Grip

Edward T. Hirsch

Project Manager

Marc Hirschfeld

Steadicam Operator

Robert G Hoelen

Grip

Bradford L Hohle

Apprentice

Diane Holland

Visual Effects

Thomas A Holland

Generator Operator

Theresa Honeycutt

Craft Service

Art Hoover

Caterer

Richard Hornung

Costume Designer

Ian Hunter

Visual Effects

Paul Huston

Visual Effects

Joie Hutchinson

Costume Supervisor

Donna Isaacson

Casting

Kenton Jacob

Adr

Parker Jason Jarvis

Production Assistant

Roderick Jaynes

Screenplay

Roderick Jaynes

Producer

Derek Jensen

Grip

Shari Schwartz Johanson

Music

Thomas R Johnston

Script Supervisor

Thomas M Jones

Props Assistant

Emmet Kane

Other

Karen Williams Kane

Camera Assistant

Todd Kasow

Music

Frank Kern

Foley Editor

Ralph Kerr

Other

Aram Khachaturian

Music

Tracy Kilpatrick

Casting Associate

Jeremy Knaster

Electrician

Sonny Kompanek

Music Arranger

Peter Kurland

Boom Operator

Alma Kuttruff

Production Manager

Jennifer Lamb

Other

Charles Laughon

Video Playback

Ronald Leahy

Grip

Jeffrey A Leake

Visual Effects

Skip Lievsay

Sound Editor

Mark Lindberg

Electrician

Tinker Linville

On-Set Dresser

Jeff Long

Transportation Captain

John B Lowry

Grip

Bill Luckey

Assistant Property Master

Jennifer Luther

Assistant Production Coordinator

John S. Lyons

Casting

Victor Malone

Assistant Director

Kim Marks

Director Of Photography

Kim Marks

Dp/Cinematographer

Gary Marvis

Visual Effects

Jeff Matakovich

Other

Gilliane Mcalister

Makeup

Michael J Mcalister

Visual Effects Supervisor

Patrick Mcallister

Electrician

Margaret Mccourt

Accountant

Leslie Mcdonald

Art Director

Roni Mckinley

Visual Effects

Heather Eloise Mclellan

Production Assistant

Jennifer Mcmanus

Other

Peter Mcmanus

Accounting Assistant

Heidi Mehltretter

Location Coordinator

Robin Melhuish

Camera Assistant

Photo Collections

The Hudsucker Proxy - Movie Poster
The Hudsucker Proxy - Movie Poster

Film Details

Also Known As
Hudsucker Proxy, Strebern, gran salto, El
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Period
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Wilmington, North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Articles

The Hudsucker Proxy


When the president of Hudsucker Industries commits suicide by taking a running jump through the forty-fourth floor boardroom window, his executive staff panics. But chairman of the board Sidney J. Mussburger (Paul Newman) finds a way to turn the situation to his advantage by concocting a devious stock manipulation that will devalue the Hudsucker holdings and allow him and his cronies to buy them up cheaply. All he has to do is hire a total moron to run the company and let nature take its course. Mussburger finds the perfect patsy in Norville Barnes (Tim Robbins), a bumbling mailroom employee. Due to a strange twist of fate, Norville's idea for a children's toy - the Hula Hoop - ultimately reverses the company's poor financial situation and sabotages Mussburger's master plan.

Easily the most ambitious film to date for the Coen Brothers, The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) was also their biggest commercial flop; it cost $25 million to make and only grossed $3 million at the box office. Part of the expense was due to the spectacular special effects and the elaborate set design (by Dennis Gassner) which should have won an Oscar®. The entire film is an affectionate throwback to another era of Hollywood filmmaking and is loaded with classic movie references: Jennifer Jason Leigh's performance as fast-talking reporter Amy Archer seems modeled on the Hildy Johnson character (played by Rosalind Russell) in His Girl Friday (1940); the massive, inner workings of the giant mechanical clock look like something out of Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1926); and the angel who saves Norville from a skyscraper high dive could have been inspired by the heavenly messenger in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946).

It was reported that Winona Ryder had auditioned for the Amy Archer role and was very disappointed when she didn't get it. It's doubtful her presence would have improved The Hudsucker Proxy's performance at the box office because the film was just too stylized and eccentric to appeal to mainstream audiences. Coen Brothers fans won't be disappointed, however, and there are plenty of hilarious bits sprinkled throughout the film from the fake hula hoop newsreel footage to Peter Gallagher's cameo as a flashy lounge singer in the Dean Martin mode.

The Hudsucker Proxy went on to receive a nomination for the prestigious Golden Palm award at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival and to win the Best Production Design award from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Director: Joel Coen
Producer: Ethan Coen, Tim Bevan (executive), Eric Fellner (executive), Graham Place (co-producer)
Screenplay: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, Sam Raimi
Cinematography: Roger Deakins
Music: Carter Burwell
Art Direction: Leslie McDonald
Cast: Tim Robbins (Norville Barnes), Jennifer Jason Leigh (Amy Archer), Paul Newman (Sidney J. Mussburger), Charles Durning (Waring Hudsucker), John Mahoney (Chief), Jim True (Clarence Gunderson), Bill Cobbs (Moses), Bruce Campbell (Smitty)
C-101m.

by Jeff Stafford
The Hudsucker Proxy

The Hudsucker Proxy

When the president of Hudsucker Industries commits suicide by taking a running jump through the forty-fourth floor boardroom window, his executive staff panics. But chairman of the board Sidney J. Mussburger (Paul Newman) finds a way to turn the situation to his advantage by concocting a devious stock manipulation that will devalue the Hudsucker holdings and allow him and his cronies to buy them up cheaply. All he has to do is hire a total moron to run the company and let nature take its course. Mussburger finds the perfect patsy in Norville Barnes (Tim Robbins), a bumbling mailroom employee. Due to a strange twist of fate, Norville's idea for a children's toy - the Hula Hoop - ultimately reverses the company's poor financial situation and sabotages Mussburger's master plan. Easily the most ambitious film to date for the Coen Brothers, The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) was also their biggest commercial flop; it cost $25 million to make and only grossed $3 million at the box office. Part of the expense was due to the spectacular special effects and the elaborate set design (by Dennis Gassner) which should have won an Oscar®. The entire film is an affectionate throwback to another era of Hollywood filmmaking and is loaded with classic movie references: Jennifer Jason Leigh's performance as fast-talking reporter Amy Archer seems modeled on the Hildy Johnson character (played by Rosalind Russell) in His Girl Friday (1940); the massive, inner workings of the giant mechanical clock look like something out of Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1926); and the angel who saves Norville from a skyscraper high dive could have been inspired by the heavenly messenger in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946). It was reported that Winona Ryder had auditioned for the Amy Archer role and was very disappointed when she didn't get it. It's doubtful her presence would have improved The Hudsucker Proxy's performance at the box office because the film was just too stylized and eccentric to appeal to mainstream audiences. Coen Brothers fans won't be disappointed, however, and there are plenty of hilarious bits sprinkled throughout the film from the fake hula hoop newsreel footage to Peter Gallagher's cameo as a flashy lounge singer in the Dean Martin mode. The Hudsucker Proxy went on to receive a nomination for the prestigious Golden Palm award at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival and to win the Best Production Design award from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. Director: Joel Coen Producer: Ethan Coen, Tim Bevan (executive), Eric Fellner (executive), Graham Place (co-producer) Screenplay: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, Sam Raimi Cinematography: Roger Deakins Music: Carter Burwell Art Direction: Leslie McDonald Cast: Tim Robbins (Norville Barnes), Jennifer Jason Leigh (Amy Archer), Paul Newman (Sidney J. Mussburger), Charles Durning (Waring Hudsucker), John Mahoney (Chief), Jim True (Clarence Gunderson), Bill Cobbs (Moses), Bruce Campbell (Smitty) C-101m. by Jeff Stafford

TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008) - Important Schedule Change for Paul Newman Tribute
Sunday, October 12


In Honor of Paul Newman, who died on September 26, TCM will air a tribute to the actor on Sunday, October 12th, replacing the current scheduled programming with the following movies:

Sunday, October 12 Program for TCM
6:00 AM The Rack
8:00 AM Until They Sail
10:00 AM Torn Curtain
12:15 PM Exodus
3:45 PM Sweet Bird of Youth
6:00 PM Hud
8:00 PM Somebody Up There Likes Me
10:00 PM Cool Hand Luke
12:15 AM Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
2:15 AM Rachel, Rachel
4:00 AM The Outrage


TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008)
Paul Newman, with his electric blue eyes and gutsy willingness to play anti-heroes, established himself as one of the movies' great leading men before settling into his latter-day career of flinty character acting. Born in Shaker Heights, Ohio, in 1925, Newman studied at the Yale Drama School and New York's Actors Studio before making his Broadway debut in Picnic.

Newman's breakthrough in films came in Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), in which he played boxer Rocky Graziano. He quickly reinforced his reputation in such vehicles as The Rack (1956) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), for which he won the first of nine Oscar® nominations as an actor.

In 1958, while shooting The Long Hot Summer (1958) - which earned him the Best Actor award at the Cannes Film Festival - in Louisiana, he became re-acquainted with Joanne Woodward, who was the film's female lead. The two soon fell in love, and after divorcing Jackie, Newman and Woodward were married in Las Vegas in 1958. The couple appeared in numerous films together and had three daughters, which they raised far from Hollywood in the affluent neighborhood of Westport, CT.

The 1960s was a fruitful decade for Newman, who starred in such hits as Exodus (1960), Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969); and scored Oscar® nominations for The Hustler (1961), Hud (1963) and Cool Hand Luke (1967).

Newman's political activism also came to the forefront during the sixties, through tireless campaigning for Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign. His association with McCarthy led to his being named on future President Richard Nixon's infamous "Opponents List;" Newman, who ranked #19 out of 20, later commented that his inclusion was among the proudest achievements of his career.

Newman's superstar status - he was the top-ranking box office star in 1969 and 1970 - allowed him to experiment with film roles during the 1970s, which led to quirky choices like WUSA (1970), Sometimes a Great Notion (1971), Pocket Money (1972), and The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972) - all of which he also produced through First Artists, a company he established with fellow stars Sidney Poitier and Barbra Streisand.

After coming close to winning an Oscar® for Absence of Malice (1981), Newman finally won the award itself for The Color of Money (1986). He also received an honorary Oscar® in 1986 and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1994. A producer and director as well as an actor, Newman has directed his wife (and frequent costar) Joanne Woodward through some of her most effective screen performances [Rachel, Rachel (1968), The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds (1972)].

He remained active as an actor in his later years, playing the Stage Manager in Our Town on both stage and television, lending his voice to the animated features Cars (2006) and Mater and the Ghostlight (2006). Off-screen, Newman set the standard for celebrity-driven charities with his Newman's Own brand of foods, which brought $200 million to causes, and the Hole in the Wall Gang camp for seriously ill children.

TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008) - Important Schedule Change for Paul Newman Tribute Sunday, October 12

In Honor of Paul Newman, who died on September 26, TCM will air a tribute to the actor on Sunday, October 12th, replacing the current scheduled programming with the following movies: Sunday, October 12 Program for TCM 6:00 AM The Rack 8:00 AM Until They Sail 10:00 AM Torn Curtain 12:15 PM Exodus 3:45 PM Sweet Bird of Youth 6:00 PM Hud 8:00 PM Somebody Up There Likes Me 10:00 PM Cool Hand Luke 12:15 AM Cat on a Hot Tin Roof 2:15 AM Rachel, Rachel 4:00 AM The Outrage TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008) Paul Newman, with his electric blue eyes and gutsy willingness to play anti-heroes, established himself as one of the movies' great leading men before settling into his latter-day career of flinty character acting. Born in Shaker Heights, Ohio, in 1925, Newman studied at the Yale Drama School and New York's Actors Studio before making his Broadway debut in Picnic. Newman's breakthrough in films came in Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), in which he played boxer Rocky Graziano. He quickly reinforced his reputation in such vehicles as The Rack (1956) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), for which he won the first of nine Oscar® nominations as an actor. In 1958, while shooting The Long Hot Summer (1958) - which earned him the Best Actor award at the Cannes Film Festival - in Louisiana, he became re-acquainted with Joanne Woodward, who was the film's female lead. The two soon fell in love, and after divorcing Jackie, Newman and Woodward were married in Las Vegas in 1958. The couple appeared in numerous films together and had three daughters, which they raised far from Hollywood in the affluent neighborhood of Westport, CT. The 1960s was a fruitful decade for Newman, who starred in such hits as Exodus (1960), Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969); and scored Oscar® nominations for The Hustler (1961), Hud (1963) and Cool Hand Luke (1967). Newman's political activism also came to the forefront during the sixties, through tireless campaigning for Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign. His association with McCarthy led to his being named on future President Richard Nixon's infamous "Opponents List;" Newman, who ranked #19 out of 20, later commented that his inclusion was among the proudest achievements of his career. Newman's superstar status - he was the top-ranking box office star in 1969 and 1970 - allowed him to experiment with film roles during the 1970s, which led to quirky choices like WUSA (1970), Sometimes a Great Notion (1971), Pocket Money (1972), and The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972) - all of which he also produced through First Artists, a company he established with fellow stars Sidney Poitier and Barbra Streisand. After coming close to winning an Oscar® for Absence of Malice (1981), Newman finally won the award itself for The Color of Money (1986). He also received an honorary Oscar® in 1986 and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1994. A producer and director as well as an actor, Newman has directed his wife (and frequent costar) Joanne Woodward through some of her most effective screen performances [Rachel, Rachel (1968), The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds (1972)]. He remained active as an actor in his later years, playing the Stage Manager in Our Town on both stage and television, lending his voice to the animated features Cars (2006) and Mater and the Ghostlight (2006). Off-screen, Newman set the standard for celebrity-driven charities with his Newman's Own brand of foods, which brought $200 million to causes, and the Hole in the Wall Gang camp for seriously ill children.

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)


Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86.

Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967).

But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk).

Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn.

Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86. Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967). But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk). Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn. Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)


Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72.

Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others.

Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981).

By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama.

His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role.

In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72. Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others. Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981). By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama. His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role. In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

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Winner of the 1994 award for Best Production Design from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Expanded Release in United States March 25, 1994

Released in United States May 1994

Released in United States on Video October 26, 1994

Released in United States Spring March 11, 1994

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (opening night/in competition) May 12-23, 1994.

Began shooting November 30, 1992.

Completed shooting March 19, 1993.

Released in United States Spring March 11, 1994

Expanded Release in United States March 25, 1994

Released in United States May 1994 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (opening night/in competition) May 12-23, 1994.)

Released in United States on Video October 26, 1994