Toys


2h 1m 1992

Brief Synopsis

Whimsical Leslie Zevo may not have a head for business, but he knows fun. When his dying father leaves the toy company in the hands of Lt. General Leland Zevo, Leslie will have to use the power of imagination to save the company from becoming an arms manufacturer.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Palouse River Valley, Washington, USA; Spokane, Washington, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Synopsis

Whimsical Leslie Zevo may not have a head for business, but he knows fun. When his dying father leaves the toy company in the hands of Lt. General Leland Zevo, Leslie will have to use the power of imagination to save the company from becoming an arms manufacturer.

Crew

Andrew Adamson

Technical Director

Todd Adelman

Medic

Alan J Adler

Consultant

Carl Aldana

Other

Edward Allen

Assistant Production Accountant

Randy Anflick

Other

C J Appel

Adr Editor

James M Arnett

Stunt Coordinator

Larry Aube

Dolly Grip

Paul Babin

Camera Operator

Sandina Bailo-lape

Foley Editor

Sidney R. Baldwin

Photography

James Balker

Set Costumer

Robert M Beall

Set Designer

Mat Beck

Visual Effects Supervisor

Richard Beggs

Sound Design

Richard Beggs

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

George Bernota

Mechanical Special Effects

Thomas Betts

Set Designer

David Blitstein

Special Effects Foreman

Beth Block

Production Supervisor

Gloria S Borders

Sound Editor

Rob Bottin

Other

Christopher Boyles

Foley Recordist

Littleton Brothers

Visual Effects

George Bruder

Animator

Charles John Bukey

Dolly Grip

Keith Campbell

Stunts

Randy Cantor

Transportation Captain

Anjelica Casillas

Animator

Ellen Chenoweth

Casting

Larry Clause

Props

Allegra Clegg

Other

Alan B Cohen

Assistant Camera Operator

Gil Combs

Stunts

William Conner

Visual Effects

Anthony Cope

Visual Effects

Denis Cordova

Props

Christopher Cowan

Miniatures

Jimmy Cullen

Costumes

Valerie Curtin

Screenplay

Hallie D'amore

Makeup Artist

Blair Daily

Associate Editor

Mark Daily

Assistant Editor

Kate Davey

Assistant Director

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Mark Deallessandro

Stunts

Sara B Dee

Assistant

Michael Denering

Scenic Artist

Linda Descenna

Set Decorator

John E. Dexter

Set Designer

Jamie Dixon

Digital Effects Supervisor

Pat Domenico

Special Effects Foreman

Fred Donelson

Video

Stephen P Dunn

Assistant Director

Beverli Eagan

Set Designer

Janet Earl

Video

John Ellingwood

Assistant Camera Operator

John Elliot

Other

David Emerson

Visual Effects

Andrew W Epper

Stunts

Jennifer Erskine

Assistant

Jeff Evans

Stunts

Ronald Farnsworth

Scenic Artist

Michael Fauntleroy

Assistant Camera Operator

Fernando Favila

Other

Anthony Feola

Foreman

Michele Ferrone

Visual Effects

Kelley Finn

Production Assistant

Jim Flamberg

Music Supervisor

Curtis Rowe Foster

Electrician

Bruce L. Fowler

Original Music

Bruce L. Fowler

Music

Suzanne Fox

Assistant Editor

Clare Freeman

Foley Editor

Leigh French

Adr

Harold Fuhrman

Set Designer

Mark Garbarino

Other

Gary George

Visual Effects

Giancarlo Giannini

Sound

Jay Gianukos

Production Assistant

Julia Gibson

Visual Effects

Scott Giegler

Video

Katie Gilbert

Production Coordinator

Nancy Gilmore

On-Set Dresser

Peter Giuliano

Assistant Director

Peter Giuliano

Coproducer

Nico Golfar

Music

Nancy A Gomes

Other

Tim Gomes

Other

David E Gonzales

Production

Henry Gonzales

Other

Roy Goode

Mechanical Special Effects

Dennis Gothie

Props

Robert H Grasmere

Post-Production Supervisor

Robert Gray

Key Grip

Adam Greenberg

Director Of Photography

Ron Gress

Other

Brian Griffin

Visual Effects

Scott Guitteau

Assistant Editor

Rhonda Gunner

Video

Yael Haffner

Art Department Coordinator

Todd Hall

Visual Effects

Russell Hanson

Production Assistant

Donald Hardenburg

Props

Charles Harrington

Location Manager

William Harrison

Special Effects Foreman

Pete Haycock

Music

Eric Heisler

Mechanical Special Effects

Lora Hirschberg

Sound

Richard Hollander

Video

Trevor Horn

Music

Kelly Householder

Production Assistant

Steve Howard

Video

Joseph E Hubbard

Set Designer

Gary Hymes

Stunts

Dream Quest Images

Special Effects

John Isham

Other

Robert Jackson

Boom Operator

Debra James

Assistant Production Coordinator

Jack Johnson

Assistant Art Director

Mark Johnson

Producer

Tom Johnson

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Matt D Johnston

Stunts

Ronald Judkins

Sound Mixer

Chris Kahn

Production Assistant

Susan V Kalinowski

Hair

Aaron Katz

Video

David Katz

Video Playback

Maria Kelly

Stunts

Pat Kenly

Camera

Sanford Kennedy

Mechanical Special Effects

Gary Kieldrup

Assistant Property Master

Nancy Jane King

Production Assistant

Teruhisa Kitahara

Consultant

Robert Kohut

Mechanical Special Effects

Greg Kozikowski

Video

Peter Kuran

Visual Effects

Kevin Kutchaver

Visual Effects

Dennis Laine

Assistant Camera Operator

Kevin J. Lang

Electrician

Carol Larkin

Casting Associate

Shawna Leavell

Assistant Costume Designer

Chet Leonard

Other

Jody Levine

Visual Effects

Barry Levinson

Producer

Barry Levinson

Screenplay

Stu Linder

Editor

Carlane Passman Little

Costume Supervisor

George L. Little

Costume Supervisor

Roland Walter Loew

Mechanical Special Effects

Kamran Manoochehri

Other

Rebecca Marie

Animator

Joel Marrow

Transportation Coordinator

Ron Marshall

Other

Jo Martin

Visual Effects

Gary Marvis

Visual Effects

Charles May

Video

Barbara Mccullough

Production Manager

Lisa Mccullough-dealessandro

Stunts

Jonathan Mcgarry

Production Assistant

Steven C. Mcgee

Gaffer

Gregory L Mcmurry

Video

Michael John Meehan

Location Manager

Barbara Meier

Animator

Mike Michaels

Music

Julia Migenes

Music

Cheri Minns

Makeup

John Moffitt

Scenic Artist

Marnie Moore

Foley Artist

Nick Navarro

Set Designer

Marilyn Nave

Visual Effects

Greg Nelson

Makeup

Charles J. Newirth

Unit Production Manager

Charles J. Newirth

Coproducer

Eric T Nicolaisen

Production

Carole Nix

Other

Errol C Nofziger

Other

Phil Olbrantz

Assistant Editor

Robert Olivas

Visual Effects

Daniel L Ondrejko

Other

Joseph Ondrejko

Props

Janet Lee Orcutt

Stunts

Joe Pacelli

Assistant Art Director

Anthony L Paquet

Medic

Dennis Parrish

Property Master

Hope M. Parrish

Assistant Property Master

Andrew Peltz

Production Assistant

Daniel Ray Pemberton

Other

Jeffrey J Perkins

Other

Scott Peterson

Video

Donn Piller

On-Set Dresser

Arthur Pimentel

Other

Clay Pinney

Special Effects Coordinator

Julie Pitkanen

Script Supervisor

Larry Potoker

Video

Vincent Prentice

Other

Jeff Pyle

Visual Effects

Tom Quinn

Mechanical Special Effects

Willie Radcliff

Craft Service

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Palouse River Valley, Washington, USA; Spokane, Washington, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1992
Ferdinando Scarfiotti

Best Costume Design

1992
Albert Wolsky

Articles

Donald O'Connor, 1925-2003


Donald O'Connor, the sprightly, acrobatic dancer-comedian who was unforgettable in his exhilarating "Make 'em Laugh" number in the classic musical Singin' in the Rain, died of heart failure at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California on September 27. He was 78.

Born Donald David Dixon O' Connor in Chicago on August 28, 1925, he was raised in an atmosphere of show business. His parents were circus trapeze artists and later vaudeville entertainers, and as soon as young Donald was old enough to walk, he was performing in a variety of dance and stunt routines all across the country. Discovered by a film scout at age 11, he made his film debut with two of his brothers in Melody for Two (1937), and was singled out for a contract by Paramount Pictures. He co-starred with Bing Crosby and Fred MacMurray in Sing, You Sinners (1938) and played juvenile roles in several films, including Huckleberry Finn in Tom Sawyer - Detective (1938) and the title character as a child in Beau Geste (1939).

As O'Connor grew into adolescence, he fared pretty well as a youthful hoofer, dancing up a storm in a string of low-budget, but engaging musicals for Universal Studios (often teamed with the equally vigorous Peggy Ryan) during World War II. Titles like What's Cookin', Get Hep to Love (both 1942), Chip Off the Old Block and Strictly in the Groove (both 1943) made for some fairly innocuous entertainment, but they went a long way in displaying O'Connor's athletic dancing and boyish charm. As an adult, O'Connor struck paydirt again when he starred opposite a talking mule (with a voice supplied by Chill Wills) in the enormously popular Francis (1949). The story about an Army private who discovers that only he can communicate with a talking army mule, proved to be a very profitable hit with kids, and Universal went on to star him in several sequels.

Yet if O'Connor had to stake his claim to cinematic greatness, it would unquestionably be his daringly acrobatic, brazenly funny turn as Cosmo Brown, Gene Kelly's sidekick in the brilliant Singin' in the Rain (1952). Although his self-choreographed routine of "Make "Em Laugh" (which includes a mind-bending series of backflips off the walls) is often singled out as the highlight, in truth, his whole performance is one of the highlights of the film. His deft comic delivery of one-liners, crazy facial expressions (just watch him lampoon the diction teacher in the glorious "Moses Supposes" bit) and exhilarating dance moves (the opening "Fit As a Fiddle" number with Kelly to name just one) throughout the film are just sheer film treats in any critic's book.

After the success of Singin' in the Rain, O'Connor proved that he had enough charisma to command his first starring vehicle, opposite Debbie Reynolds, in the cute musical I Love Melvin (1953). He also found good parts in Call Me Madam (1953), There's No Business Like Show Business (1954), and Anything Goes (1956). Unfortunately, his one attempt at a strong dramatic role, the lead in the weak biopic The Buster Keaton Story (1957) proved to be misstep, and he was panned by the critics.

By the '60s, the popularity of musicals had faded, and O'Connor spent the next several years supporting himself with many dinner theater and nightclub appearances; but just when it looked like we wouldn't see O'Connor's talent shine again on the small or big screen, he found himself in demand at the dawn of the '90s in a string of TV appearances: Murder She Wrote, Tales From the Crypt, Fraser, The Nanny; and movies: Robin Williams' toy-manufacturer father in Toys (1992), a fellow passenger in the Lemmon-Matthau comedy, Out to Sea (1997), that were as welcoming as they were heartening. Survivors include his wife, Gloria; four children, Alicia, Donna, Fred and Kevin; and four grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Donald O'connor, 1925-2003

Donald O'Connor, 1925-2003

Donald O'Connor, the sprightly, acrobatic dancer-comedian who was unforgettable in his exhilarating "Make 'em Laugh" number in the classic musical Singin' in the Rain, died of heart failure at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California on September 27. He was 78. Born Donald David Dixon O' Connor in Chicago on August 28, 1925, he was raised in an atmosphere of show business. His parents were circus trapeze artists and later vaudeville entertainers, and as soon as young Donald was old enough to walk, he was performing in a variety of dance and stunt routines all across the country. Discovered by a film scout at age 11, he made his film debut with two of his brothers in Melody for Two (1937), and was singled out for a contract by Paramount Pictures. He co-starred with Bing Crosby and Fred MacMurray in Sing, You Sinners (1938) and played juvenile roles in several films, including Huckleberry Finn in Tom Sawyer - Detective (1938) and the title character as a child in Beau Geste (1939). As O'Connor grew into adolescence, he fared pretty well as a youthful hoofer, dancing up a storm in a string of low-budget, but engaging musicals for Universal Studios (often teamed with the equally vigorous Peggy Ryan) during World War II. Titles like What's Cookin', Get Hep to Love (both 1942), Chip Off the Old Block and Strictly in the Groove (both 1943) made for some fairly innocuous entertainment, but they went a long way in displaying O'Connor's athletic dancing and boyish charm. As an adult, O'Connor struck paydirt again when he starred opposite a talking mule (with a voice supplied by Chill Wills) in the enormously popular Francis (1949). The story about an Army private who discovers that only he can communicate with a talking army mule, proved to be a very profitable hit with kids, and Universal went on to star him in several sequels. Yet if O'Connor had to stake his claim to cinematic greatness, it would unquestionably be his daringly acrobatic, brazenly funny turn as Cosmo Brown, Gene Kelly's sidekick in the brilliant Singin' in the Rain (1952). Although his self-choreographed routine of "Make "Em Laugh" (which includes a mind-bending series of backflips off the walls) is often singled out as the highlight, in truth, his whole performance is one of the highlights of the film. His deft comic delivery of one-liners, crazy facial expressions (just watch him lampoon the diction teacher in the glorious "Moses Supposes" bit) and exhilarating dance moves (the opening "Fit As a Fiddle" number with Kelly to name just one) throughout the film are just sheer film treats in any critic's book. After the success of Singin' in the Rain, O'Connor proved that he had enough charisma to command his first starring vehicle, opposite Debbie Reynolds, in the cute musical I Love Melvin (1953). He also found good parts in Call Me Madam (1953), There's No Business Like Show Business (1954), and Anything Goes (1956). Unfortunately, his one attempt at a strong dramatic role, the lead in the weak biopic The Buster Keaton Story (1957) proved to be misstep, and he was panned by the critics. By the '60s, the popularity of musicals had faded, and O'Connor spent the next several years supporting himself with many dinner theater and nightclub appearances; but just when it looked like we wouldn't see O'Connor's talent shine again on the small or big screen, he found himself in demand at the dawn of the '90s in a string of TV appearances: Murder She Wrote, Tales From the Crypt, Fraser, The Nanny; and movies: Robin Williams' toy-manufacturer father in Toys (1992), a fellow passenger in the Lemmon-Matthau comedy, Out to Sea (1997), that were as welcoming as they were heartening. Survivors include his wife, Gloria; four children, Alicia, Donna, Fred and Kevin; and four grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video May 26, 1993

Released in United States Winter December 18, 1992

Barry Levinson had this project in development at 20th Century Fox in 1980, but it was put in turnaround and took another decade to finally get made.

Began shooting February 25, 1992.

Completed shooting June 26, 1992.

Released in United States on Video May 26, 1993

Released in United States Winter December 18, 1992