The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean


2h 1972
The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean

Brief Synopsis

A self-appointed judge cleans up a corrupt western town twice.

Film Details

Also Known As
Law and Order
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Western
Adventure
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
Dec 1972
Premiere Information
New York opening: 18 Dec 1972; Los Angeles opening: 22 Dec 1972
Production Company
Coleytown Productions, Inc.; First Artists Production Company, Ltd.
Distribution Company
National General Pictures Corporation
Country
United States
Location
Happy Valley, Arizona, USA; Happy Valley, Arizona, United States; Tucson, Arizona, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

In the 1890s, in Texas, outlaw Roy Bean arrives at the ramshackle saloon in Vinegaroon, a village of poor Mexicans. Because no law has jurisdiction west of the Pecos River, Bean hopes to be given sanctuary by outlaws living there, but the debauched fugitives, who spend their days drinking and whoring, reject Bean's request. Instead, they beat him, steal his money, put a noose around his neck and tie it to his horse. Then, they scare the animal into dragging him away. After Marie Elena, a young woman of the village, comes to his aid and gives him a gun, Bean returns to the saloon and shoots dead his adversaries. Soon after, Reverend LaSalle, a traveling preacher, encounters Bean guarding the saloon from a rocking chair outside the door and convinces him to bury the dead. After finding an old law book in the saloon, Bean declares himself a judge and promises the villagers a new era of peace and civilization, no matter who he has to kill. Bean gives the villagers the outlaws' horses, guns and land, but, shrewdly, they accept only the horses and name him their "patrone," placing themselves under his protection. Marie Elena, whom Bean calls his "angel," offers to live with him, but he settles her in a little shack next to the saloon, which he converts to serve as his residence and courthouse. He names the saloon "The Jersey Lily," after the famous actress Lily Langtry, whose poster he nails to the wall. Although he has never met Langtry, Bean loves her in a courtly manner and writes to her often. On the occasion that he receives an acknowledgment of receipt from Langtry's secretary, he cherishes it as if it were touched by Langtry herself. One day outlaw Big Bart Jackson and his gang ride into town. Normally Bean would try and hang them, but as they have money, he instead invites them to buy drinks at his saloon. Reasoning that a judge needs someone to prosecute, the men offer to find some outlaws for Bean to hang. Bean then recruits Bart and his gang members Nick the Grub, Fermel Parlee and Whorehouse Lucky Jim to be marshals. The fifth member, Tector Crites, becomes Bean's saloonkeeper. Agreeing to uphold the law "for Texas and Miss Lily," the marshals first round up Sam Dodd, who robbed and killed a Chinese man. Although Dodd says the law book does not mention "Chinamen," Bean, claiming to be an advanced thinker, hangs Dodd and takes the money he stole as fines. As Bean and his marshals play poker, a drunk, Snake River Rufus Krile, fires indiscriminately in the saloon. The marshals ignore Krile's outburst until he takes aim at Miss Lily's poster, after which they simultaneously shoot him dead. Discovering that Krile shot Miss Lily through the heart, Bean rules his death a justifiable homicide and fines the dead man all his money. The marshals arrest criminals of various misdeeds throughout the countryside and the executed men soon fill a cemetery outside the saloon. From the confiscated funds of the doomed men, Bean makes civic improvements and both he and the marshals prosper. He lavishes Marie Elena with clothes from the Sears Roebuck catalog, but otherwise keeps distant from her. When a traveling bordello rides into town, Bean banishes the pimp and, after matching each prostitute with one of his marshals, rules that the women spend a year in their protective custody. Although Bean takes one prostitute for himself, Marie Elena fires at them with a rifle, causing Bean to advise the woman to steal a fast horse and escape. Bean follows the angry Marie Elena to the edge of town. While gazing at the desert, he predicts a future of tall buildings, factories, a railroad station and a big granite courthouse. Bean promises Marie Elena that she can have anything, and when she asks for a music box, he suggests that it will play "The Yellow Rose of Texas." Although Marie Elena moves into the saloon with Bean, he continues to worship Langtry as an unattainable goddess but admits that Marie Elena, his "mortal woman," is dearer. One day, when the wagon of elderly mountain man Grizzly Adams breaks down outside of town, Grizzly, expecting to die soon, asks Bean to adopt his "son," the large, bear-swilling bear that accompanies him. Before leaving, Grizzly cuts the bear loose and threatens to haunt Bean if he mistreats the animal. Although at first annoyed, Bean and Marie Elena enjoy the bear's company and take him on picnics. Soon after, Bad Bob, an evil albino outlaw coveting Bean's authority and prosperity, gallops into town, shooting off his guns and scaring everyone. When Bob challenges Bean to a showdown, Bean, stationed in a nearby hayloft, shoots him dead from behind. Some time later, lawyer Frank Gass comes to town, claiming to have inherited the saloon from its previous owner. Bean tosses Gass in the bear's cage until the lawyer drops his claim, and then suggests a professional relationship, in which Gass will use his knowledge of the law to ensure that Bean will be the beneficiary of the estates of the executed criminals. Although Gass receives a percentage of the estates, he secretly holds a grudge against Bean for caging him and, some time later, hires an assassin to murder Bean during the night. Although the bear kills the assassin, it dies in the struggle, instilling a sense of foreboding in Bean. The prostitutes, who now consider themselves respectable, form an alliance with Gass to despose Bean and begin to gossip maliciously about the pregnant Marie Elena. When the wives demand that Bean desist from calling them "whores" and stop displaying the bodies of the men he hangs, Bean senses that he is becoming a pariah in his own town. Deciding to travel to San Antonio to see Langtry perform, Bean arrives in the city, looking out of place in top hat and tall boots. Upon discovering that the show is sold out, Bean falls victim to con men who, claiming that they can introduce him to Langtry, lure him into an alley, where they knock him unconscious and rob him. Returning home with a music box for Marie Elena, Bean learns that she is near death after giving birth to their daughter, who is named Rose after the song. Despite Bean's "ruling" that she survive, Marie Elena dies, and when an inebriated doctor arrives too late, Bean decides to hang him. The execution is stopped by Gass, who became mayor during Bean's absence through a political coup assisted by the prostitutes. Although the marshals offer to ignore Gass's claim to power and carry on as before, Bean, defeated, rides off into the desert. As Tector rears Rose in the saloon and regales her with tales of the old days, Gass brings in Eastern killers and hoodlum politicians. He fires the marshals, who take lowly jobs and are abandoned by the prostitutes. Gang wars erupt, oil is discovered and The Jersey Lily is dwarfed by oil rigs. To obtain the oil under the saloon, Gass evicts Rose and Tector. Although Rose, who is now grown to adulthood, wants to fight him in court, Tector explains that Gass has corrupt officials on his side. Just then, Rose looks up and sees the silhouette of a man on a horse, whom Tector identifies as Bean. That evening, Bean and his reunited marshals are ready to fight when Gass's men surround the saloon. A shootout commences, in which the town erupts in flame while Bean chases Gass to his death, and Rose and the marshals fight his henchmen. In the commotion, Rose sees Bean ride his horse into Gass's hotel, where, from the second floor balcony, he calls out, "For Texas and Miss Lily!" just before a burning oil rig falls on the wooden building. The Jersey Lily survives the fire, but the wells dry up and the criminals leave, allowing the desert to reclaim the land. After Rose marries an aviator who crash-landed his plane, Tector and Billy, the stationmaster, remain to run the saloon, which has been turned into a museum devoted to Bean and Miss Lily. Langtry is touring the country when her railcar, also called "The Jersey Lily," stops at the ghost town out of curiosity. Recalling the "funny old judge's" letters, Langtry listens to stories of Bean's devotion. When Tector gives her a letter he found in the old law book in which Bean writes about the honor of adoring her, Langtry wistfully acknowledges that Bean was "quite a character."

Videos

Movie Clip

Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean (1972) -- (Movie Clip) Fate Of The Wicked The full performance of Tab Hunter as unrepentant murderous drifter Dodd, addressing the camera in the same manner as other famous-actor-cameo characters, processed quickly by Paul Newman as the title character, bogus judge in 1890’s West Texas, Jim Burk, Matt Clark, Bill McKinney, Ned Beatty and Steve Kanaly the new deputies, in John Huston’s The Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean, 1972.
Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean, The (1972) -- (Movie Clip) I Ain't Through Killin' Ya! Outrageous Western comic slaughter from writer John Milius and director John Huston, Victoria Principal as Maria Elena brings a gun to Roy (Paul Newman), who takes revenge on the low-lifes who robbed and nearly hanged him on arrival, in The Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean, 1972.
Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean, The (1972) -- (Movie Clip) First Time I Saw Roy Bean Before it’s clear that much of the movie will consist of visits by top actors in character roles, Anthony Perkins is the first, as Reverend LaSalle, discovering Roy (Paul Newman) shortly after he’s killed all the Anglo residents of his nascent town, in The Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean, 1972.
Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean, The (1972) -- (Movie Clip) The Original Bad Bob Maybe the most outrageous of the extended cameos in director John Huston’s comic Western, Ned Beatty narrates and Stacy Keach appears as Bad Bob, a former fellow of the title character (Paul Newman, not seen here) in earlier days, in The Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean, 1972.

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Law and Order
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Western
Adventure
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
Dec 1972
Premiere Information
New York opening: 18 Dec 1972; Los Angeles opening: 22 Dec 1972
Production Company
Coleytown Productions, Inc.; First Artists Production Company, Ltd.
Distribution Company
National General Pictures Corporation
Country
United States
Location
Happy Valley, Arizona, USA; Happy Valley, Arizona, United States; Tucson, Arizona, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Song

1972

Articles

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean - The Live and Times of Judge Roy Bean



In 1940 United Artists released William Wyler's glossy and romanticized The Westerner, starring one of the quintessential Western screen idols, Gary Cooper, in addition to Walter Brennan as the true life Texas character Judge Roy Bean. Brennan won an Academy Award® for his showcase role. Thirty years later maverick screenwriter John Milius developed a script based on the same character. The time was ripe for an iconoclastic take on Old West justice; Arthur Penn's Little Big Man (1970) was a similarly sprawling epic of revisionist Western history and satire, released two years earlier to rave critical notices and success at the box-office. Milius, who was coming off great acclaim for his screenplay for Jeremiah Johnson (1972), had hoped that The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972) would be his directorial debut. Producer John Foreman opted for a more experienced hand, and the script caught the eye of veteran director John Huston.

The film unfolds as a series of vignettes. Among the lengthiest is the introduction, a handy origin story. In the West Texas of the 1890s, a beaten-down outlaw named Roy Bean (Paul Newman) arrives in Vinegaroon, a small village of Mexicans. Bean sees a wanted poster with his picture on it, draws a mustache on himself, and enters a dust-encrusted saloon (that he knows is filled with fellow outlaws) looking for refuge. The low-lifes instead turn Bean on his head to empty his pockets, beat him, and tie a rope around his neck and send him sliding toward death into the desert behind a galloping horse. Bean survives, and is given water and a gun by Marie Elena (Victoria Principal), a young woman in the village. In an apocalyptic act of revenge, Bean returns to the saloon and slaughters everyone inside. Finding an enormous law book, Bean appoints himself Judge and, having already staked his claim in blood, turns the saloon into his home and courthouse. He names it "The Jersey Lily," after the famous Eastern actress Lily Langtry (Ava Gardner), with whom Bean is obsessed.

Following the promising introduction - equal parts gritty verisimilitude and wild cartoonish exaggeration - the film introduces a number of characters who intersect with Bean's god-like control of his particular slice of land. Reverend LaSalle (Anthony Perkins) convinces Bean to bury the dead outlaws he has obliterated; Big Bart Jackson (Jim Burk) and his gang arrive and volunteer to become town marshals to provide Bean with a steady stream of income and hanging victims; Snake River Rufus Krile (Neil Summers) shoots up the saloon, but is ignored until he dares to shoot a hole in a large poster of Lily Langtry; mountain man Grizzly Adams (John Huston) arrives and bequeaths his "son," a beer-drinking grizzly bear, to Bean; Bad Bob (Stacy Keach), a wild albino gunslinger, comes to put a hole in Bean's chest and fails; and Frank Gass (Roddy McDowall), a meek lawyer, brings a claim to Bean's saloon and proves to be the greatest danger to the Judge's position. The always-engaging bits that make up the film veer in tone from wild satiric slapstick to wistful nostalgia.

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean was shot on a generous budget of $4 Million, on sets built from scratch in the Arizona desert (standing in for West Texas). The location was about an hour-and-a-half outside of Tucson; Huston himself lived on the location for the duration of the shoot. He later wrote, "...I was the only one who did, except a watchman. The others went back to the town, but I stayed there all the time in a trailer. I've been on so many locations, and I've often wondered why everyone takes fatiguing, back-breaking journeys backwards and forwards, day after day, sometimes an hour's journey over rough roads, and I've often thought why not stay there, with the comfortable trailers you can live in today?"

In The Cinema of John Huston, the director told Gerald Pratley, "The writer of the original script, John Milius, was there all the time, we'd work at night. He was a joy to work with, and entered into new ideas with great enthusiasm. It turned out to be one of those pictures that we wrote as we went along." Milius refuted that account, however, as related by John McCarty in The Films of John Huston. The writer said that his original script was less of a cartoonish satire and that the Judge was a multi-dimensional character. "There were dark, evil sides to that man, as well as funny, charming sides. You saw that the evil was necessary at first, but that, as time progressed, it was no longer needed... The whole thing was horribly mangled."

Huston acknowledged the film's lack of success in his autobiography, An Open Book (Knopf, 1980), writing that The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean was not exactly a failure, "...but you could hardly call it a roaring success. It didn't take off, as they say. Still, there were some very good things in it." Huston felt that the story was "...in the fine old American tradition of the Tall Tale, the Whopper, the yarn peopled with outrageous characters capable of prodigious and highly improbable deeds. At the same time, it said something important about frontier life and the loss of America's innocence." Huston owned up to the scattershot nature of the storytelling, and wrote that "to heighten the effect, I made deliberate use of a technique that has since become much more popular, letting all sorts of events occur without logical justification. Things appear, things happen, funny, sad, comic, dramatic. Ludicrous one minute and sober the next."

Critical reaction to The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean was almost universally harsh upon its release in December of 1972. The critic for Variety called the film a "hard sell," and wondered "...how well this strange mélange of fact, fantasy and violent melodrama will sit with the mass audience... The two-hour running time is not fleshed out with anything more than vignettes...the film simply introduces one character after another, kills him off and proceeds to the next." Newsday called the film a "revisionist western that makes fun of its own characters and the heroic legends of manifest destiny... the film is not only anti-heroic, it's anti-dramatic... Its self-mockery finally reduces it to a superficial joke." The San Francisco Chronicle critic wrote that "it is a string of sequences, some for the sake of a gag which isn't worth the footage, some for a grotesque but hearty laugh, some to bridge the gap between Blood & Guts and Hearts & Flowers." And the brickbats continued to fly; Time's Jay Cocks dismissed the film as "inept in almost every regard", New Republic's Stanley Kauffmann called it an "unconscious parody", The New Yorker's Pauline Kael termed it a "disgraceful shambles", while the Washington Post's Gary Arnold found it to be "a big name bummer."

In the broad genre survey The Western: from silents to the seventies, authors George N. Fenin and William K. Everson find Huston's then-new film to be "a jewel," praising Milius for achieving "...that rare balance between comedy and sardonic comment on the foibles of a era." In his genre survey some years later (The Western), Phil Hardy also holds the film in esteem, writing that "Milius' script and Huston's rip-roaring direction occasionally clash but stand united in their commitment to a rowdy yet elegiac notion of heroism. The film, which was badly received at the time of its original release, is (like the marvelous The Man Who Would B King, 1975) clearly one of Huston's most personal works and one of the best Westerns of the seventies."

Clearly having enjoyed the experience of working together on The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, producer Foreman, director Huston, and star Newman teamed up again for the spy thriller The MacKintosh Man (1973), from a script by Walter Hill.

Producers: John Foreman
Director: John Huston
Screenplay: John Milius (original screenplay); C.L. Sonnichsen (book)
Cinematography: Richard Moore
Art Direction: Tambi Larsen
Music: Maurice Jarre
Film Editing: Hugh S. Fowler
Cast: Paul Newman (Judge Roy Bean), Victoria Principal (Marie Elena), Anthony Perkins (Reverend LaSalle), Ned Beatty (Tector Crites), Tab Hunter (Sam Dodd), John Huston (Grizzly Adams), Stacy Keach (Bad Bob), Roddy McDowall (Frank Gass), Billy Pearson (Stationmaster), Jacqueline Bisset (Rose Bean), Ava Gardner (Lily Langtry).
C-124m. Letterboxed.

By John M. Miller

The Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean - The Live And Times Of Judge Roy Bean

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean - The Live and Times of Judge Roy Bean

In 1940 United Artists released William Wyler's glossy and romanticized The Westerner, starring one of the quintessential Western screen idols, Gary Cooper, in addition to Walter Brennan as the true life Texas character Judge Roy Bean. Brennan won an Academy Award® for his showcase role. Thirty years later maverick screenwriter John Milius developed a script based on the same character. The time was ripe for an iconoclastic take on Old West justice; Arthur Penn's Little Big Man (1970) was a similarly sprawling epic of revisionist Western history and satire, released two years earlier to rave critical notices and success at the box-office. Milius, who was coming off great acclaim for his screenplay for Jeremiah Johnson (1972), had hoped that The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972) would be his directorial debut. Producer John Foreman opted for a more experienced hand, and the script caught the eye of veteran director John Huston. The film unfolds as a series of vignettes. Among the lengthiest is the introduction, a handy origin story. In the West Texas of the 1890s, a beaten-down outlaw named Roy Bean (Paul Newman) arrives in Vinegaroon, a small village of Mexicans. Bean sees a wanted poster with his picture on it, draws a mustache on himself, and enters a dust-encrusted saloon (that he knows is filled with fellow outlaws) looking for refuge. The low-lifes instead turn Bean on his head to empty his pockets, beat him, and tie a rope around his neck and send him sliding toward death into the desert behind a galloping horse. Bean survives, and is given water and a gun by Marie Elena (Victoria Principal), a young woman in the village. In an apocalyptic act of revenge, Bean returns to the saloon and slaughters everyone inside. Finding an enormous law book, Bean appoints himself Judge and, having already staked his claim in blood, turns the saloon into his home and courthouse. He names it "The Jersey Lily," after the famous Eastern actress Lily Langtry (Ava Gardner), with whom Bean is obsessed. Following the promising introduction - equal parts gritty verisimilitude and wild cartoonish exaggeration - the film introduces a number of characters who intersect with Bean's god-like control of his particular slice of land. Reverend LaSalle (Anthony Perkins) convinces Bean to bury the dead outlaws he has obliterated; Big Bart Jackson (Jim Burk) and his gang arrive and volunteer to become town marshals to provide Bean with a steady stream of income and hanging victims; Snake River Rufus Krile (Neil Summers) shoots up the saloon, but is ignored until he dares to shoot a hole in a large poster of Lily Langtry; mountain man Grizzly Adams (John Huston) arrives and bequeaths his "son," a beer-drinking grizzly bear, to Bean; Bad Bob (Stacy Keach), a wild albino gunslinger, comes to put a hole in Bean's chest and fails; and Frank Gass (Roddy McDowall), a meek lawyer, brings a claim to Bean's saloon and proves to be the greatest danger to the Judge's position. The always-engaging bits that make up the film veer in tone from wild satiric slapstick to wistful nostalgia. The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean was shot on a generous budget of $4 Million, on sets built from scratch in the Arizona desert (standing in for West Texas). The location was about an hour-and-a-half outside of Tucson; Huston himself lived on the location for the duration of the shoot. He later wrote, "...I was the only one who did, except a watchman. The others went back to the town, but I stayed there all the time in a trailer. I've been on so many locations, and I've often wondered why everyone takes fatiguing, back-breaking journeys backwards and forwards, day after day, sometimes an hour's journey over rough roads, and I've often thought why not stay there, with the comfortable trailers you can live in today?" In The Cinema of John Huston, the director told Gerald Pratley, "The writer of the original script, John Milius, was there all the time, we'd work at night. He was a joy to work with, and entered into new ideas with great enthusiasm. It turned out to be one of those pictures that we wrote as we went along." Milius refuted that account, however, as related by John McCarty in The Films of John Huston. The writer said that his original script was less of a cartoonish satire and that the Judge was a multi-dimensional character. "There were dark, evil sides to that man, as well as funny, charming sides. You saw that the evil was necessary at first, but that, as time progressed, it was no longer needed... The whole thing was horribly mangled." Huston acknowledged the film's lack of success in his autobiography, An Open Book (Knopf, 1980), writing that The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean was not exactly a failure, "...but you could hardly call it a roaring success. It didn't take off, as they say. Still, there were some very good things in it." Huston felt that the story was "...in the fine old American tradition of the Tall Tale, the Whopper, the yarn peopled with outrageous characters capable of prodigious and highly improbable deeds. At the same time, it said something important about frontier life and the loss of America's innocence." Huston owned up to the scattershot nature of the storytelling, and wrote that "to heighten the effect, I made deliberate use of a technique that has since become much more popular, letting all sorts of events occur without logical justification. Things appear, things happen, funny, sad, comic, dramatic. Ludicrous one minute and sober the next." Critical reaction to The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean was almost universally harsh upon its release in December of 1972. The critic for Variety called the film a "hard sell," and wondered "...how well this strange mélange of fact, fantasy and violent melodrama will sit with the mass audience... The two-hour running time is not fleshed out with anything more than vignettes...the film simply introduces one character after another, kills him off and proceeds to the next." Newsday called the film a "revisionist western that makes fun of its own characters and the heroic legends of manifest destiny... the film is not only anti-heroic, it's anti-dramatic... Its self-mockery finally reduces it to a superficial joke." The San Francisco Chronicle critic wrote that "it is a string of sequences, some for the sake of a gag which isn't worth the footage, some for a grotesque but hearty laugh, some to bridge the gap between Blood & Guts and Hearts & Flowers." And the brickbats continued to fly; Time's Jay Cocks dismissed the film as "inept in almost every regard", New Republic's Stanley Kauffmann called it an "unconscious parody", The New Yorker's Pauline Kael termed it a "disgraceful shambles", while the Washington Post's Gary Arnold found it to be "a big name bummer." In the broad genre survey The Western: from silents to the seventies, authors George N. Fenin and William K. Everson find Huston's then-new film to be "a jewel," praising Milius for achieving "...that rare balance between comedy and sardonic comment on the foibles of a era." In his genre survey some years later (The Western), Phil Hardy also holds the film in esteem, writing that "Milius' script and Huston's rip-roaring direction occasionally clash but stand united in their commitment to a rowdy yet elegiac notion of heroism. The film, which was badly received at the time of its original release, is (like the marvelous The Man Who Would B King, 1975) clearly one of Huston's most personal works and one of the best Westerns of the seventies." Clearly having enjoyed the experience of working together on The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, producer Foreman, director Huston, and star Newman teamed up again for the spy thriller The MacKintosh Man (1973), from a script by Walter Hill. Producers: John Foreman Director: John Huston Screenplay: John Milius (original screenplay); C.L. Sonnichsen (book) Cinematography: Richard Moore Art Direction: Tambi Larsen Music: Maurice Jarre Film Editing: Hugh S. Fowler Cast: Paul Newman (Judge Roy Bean), Victoria Principal (Marie Elena), Anthony Perkins (Reverend LaSalle), Ned Beatty (Tector Crites), Tab Hunter (Sam Dodd), John Huston (Grizzly Adams), Stacy Keach (Bad Bob), Roddy McDowall (Frank Gass), Billy Pearson (Stationmaster), Jacqueline Bisset (Rose Bean), Ava Gardner (Lily Langtry). C-124m. Letterboxed. By John M. Miller

Quotes

What has happened here?
- Rev. Mr. LaSalle
These men tried to hang me. They have been killed for it.
- Judge Roy Bean
How many of 'em are there?
- Rev. Mr. LaSalle
A lot of 'em.
- Judge Roy Bean
Who did the killing?
- Rev. Mr. LaSalle
I will read over the dead now. My Bible, please. Mister, uh...
- Rev. Mr. LaSalle
Bean.
- Judge Roy Bean
Bean?
- Rev. Mr. LaSalle
Roy Bean. Judge Roy Bean. I am the law in this area.
- Judge Roy Bean
What has qualified you as such?
- Rev. Mr. LaSalle
Justifiable homicide.
- Judge Roy Bean
I fine this man, uh, $50 for disturbing the peace and $10 for lying around.
- Judge Roy Bean

Trivia

Notes

A working title of the film was Law and Order. After the company's opening credit, a map of Texas appears on the screen and the camera zooms in to an area of the map showing the "Rio Pecos." The map is followed by a written statement, claiming that the Pecos River marked the boundaries of law and order at the turn of the century, beyond which there were "only bad men and rattlesnakes." The second of two cards reads: "Maybe this isn't the way it was...it's the way it should have been." Although the online copyright record lists Coleytown Productions, Inc., as the claimant, the opening credits contains a 1972 copyright statement reading: "Coleytown Productions, Inc., and The First Artists Production Company, Ltd. and National General Pictures Corporation."
       The opening sequence begins with Paul Newman's before the title credit. Preceded by the statement "Guest Stars in Alphabetical Order," eight of the stars' opening credits appear one at a time, without character names, except for the last card, which reads, "And Ava Gardner as Lily Langtry." Except for Gardner and Roddy McDowall (Frank Gass), the eight actors appeared in only one episode of "Roy Bean's" life. Gardner's image is shown throughout the film in photographs, until the final sequence, showing the character's visit to the museum. McDowall's character appears significantly throughout the last half of the film. Also appearing in a cameo role, portraying "Grizzly Adams," is director John Huston.
       Seven actors, who are presented as "co-starring" in the film, are listed together on the next card. The list ends with "and participation by Michael Sarrazin." Sarrazin appears only in a photograph as "Rose Bean's" aviator husband. Following Sarrazin's name is a credit reading, "introducing Victoria Principal." The film marked Principal's feature film debut. The ending credits, which appear in a different order and omit Sarrazin, provide each character's name.
       A black-and-white photo montage depicts the "marshals" arresting several outlaws. As the song "Marmalade, Molasses and Honey" is heard on the soundtrack, a film montage shows Roy Bean, "Marie Elena" and the bear picnicking. Occasionally, black-and-white photographs turn into color shots, introducing a scene. The film contains instances of fantasy, such as the killing of outlaw "Bad Bob," whose gunshot wound leaves a hole through his body large enough to see through. Onscreen and offscreen narration, often used to bridge time gaps in the story, is supplied by characters "Reverend LaSalle," "Sam Dodd," "Frank Gass" and "Tector Crites," portrayed by Anthony Perkins, Tab Hunter, McDowall and Ned Beatty, respectively. Often, the narrations are spoken directly into the camera addressing the audience and occasionally reporting information from beyond the grave.
       Although, according to studio production notes, Huston did not commit to an accurate portrayal of Roy Bean's life, many of the events in the film are based on actual incidents or on the legends and myths that surround him. The real-life Bean (ca. 1825-1903) was born in Kentucky and, at the age of fifteen, followed his older brothers west. After many adventures, he settled in Texas with his much younger Mexican wife and had several children. Unlike the film, in which Bean declared himself judge, he was appointed, and later elected to the position of Justice of the Peace and served in various districts between 1882 and 1902. Bean kept a saloon in Vinegaroon and, later, Langtry.
       Although the town of Langtry was named for a railroad man, Bean, a teller of tall tales, claimed it was named for the Jersey-born British actress, Lillie Langtry (1853-1929), with whom he was infatuated. In the film, Langtry's first name is spelled as "Lily" in the onscreen credits for Ava Gardner. As shown in the film, Bean hung Langtry's picture behind his bar and named his saloon, "The Jersey Lilly," a misspelling of Langtry's nickname, which was derived from her place of birth, Jersey in the Channel Islands. According to modern sources, there is a legend that the sign painter mistakenly added the second "L" in Lilly.
       From the saloon, which doubled as a courthouse, Bean dispensed an arbitrary kind of justice. As there was no jail, criminals were punished with fines, which Bean kept for himself, and he is said to have shortchanged his saloon customers and fined them for the amount if they complained. Despite his reputation for hanging, modern sources state that the real Bean May never have hanged anyone. As depicted in the film, a man was brought before him for killing a Chinese worker, but unlike the film, Bean acquitted the man because his law book, an 1879 Revised Statutes of Texas to which he often referred, did not specifically mention "Chinamen." Adjacent to his saloon Bean kept a menagerie of animals, including a beer-drinking black bear, which was chained to the porch and to whom some offenders were tied just out of its reach. In 1898, The Jersey Lilly burned down, but Bean replaced it with a smaller building, which is now a Texas landmark and museum.
       Bean's exploits, real and fabricated, which were written about in newspapers and dime novels, brought him fame within his own lifetime. As shown in the film, Bean corresponded with Langtry, although they never met. He did see her perform in A Wife's Peril in San Antonio, but did not try to meet her. In 1903, Bean died in his sleep after a drinking binge. Several months after his death, the actress stopped in Langtry to meet Bean and, similar to what is portrayed in the film, was at some point given one of his guns, which she bequeathed to the Jersey Museum in Great Britain. Although Bean had the reputation of a "rascal," history has credited him with bringing law and order to an otherwise lawless area and he is part of the legends and lore of the Great American West.
       In August 1971, a Daily Variety news item reported that actor Paul Newman was developing a project, titled Law and Order, which was written by John Milius. The news item stated that the production company would either be Coleytown Productions, Inc., First Artists Productions or Newman-Foreman Company, Inc., all of which Newman partly owned. According to August 1971 Variety and Daily Variety news items, Mike Medavoy served as agent for the film. August 1971 Variety and Daily Variety news items also stated that Richard Lederer originally worked on the project with Milius, although his contribution to the final film has not been confirmed.
       According to Filmfacts, the film was shot entirely in the vicinity of Tucson, AZ. Most of the filming, according to the studio production notes, occurred in Happy Valley, forty miles east of Tucson. According to studio production notes, the main set of the town was changed "almost daily" to depict how the town grew, adding buildings and, eventually, oil rigs. According to the Variety review, the cost of the fire sequence brought the project $1,000,000 over budget. Although some Hollywood Reporter production charts list Jessica Tandy in the cast, she did not appear in the final film. Modern sources add Mark Headley (Billy the Kid), Rusty Lee (Tuba player) and Duncan Inches to the cast.
       A January 1973 Daily Variety news item reported that The Dick Cavett Show aired a tribute to the movie industry on January 22, 1973, which honored Newman, Huston, producer John Foreman and the film. The Los Angeles Times review praised The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean as "one of the best of the current cycle of so-called `revisionist' westerns." The song "Marmalade, Molasses and Honey" was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. As reported in February 1973 Hollywood Reporter, Daily Variety and Variety news items, the distribution company National General Pictures filed suit against General Cinema Corp., after the latter terminated an exclusive run engagement at the Crest Theater in Westwood one month before the film's March 14, 1973 general Los Angeles release. The outcome of this suit has not been determined.
       In 1940, Walter Brennan portrayed Judge Roy Bean in the United Artists production The Westerner (see below), starring Gary Cooper, which was directed by William Wyler and featured Lillian Bond as Lillie Langtry. In 1956, a television series, Judge Roy Bean, starred Edgar Buchanan in the title role. In 1995, Ned Beatty, who portrayed "Tector Crites," was cast as Roy Bean in Streets of Laredo, a television mini-series airing on CBS that was based on the novel by Larry McMurtry. The character of Lillie Langtry has appeared in several films and television episodes, most notably two British mini-series in which Francesca Annis portrayed the actress, the 1978 Lillie and the 1975 Edward the King. The real Lillie Langtry appeared in one film, Famous Players' 1913 two-reeler, His Neighbor's Wife, which was directed by Edwin S. Porter. John "Grizzly" Adams (1812-1860) was an actual fur trapper, whose training of bears for zoos and private collectors made him an American legend. His story has been fictionalized on television and in several movies, the first of which was the 1974 feature film The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams, which starred Dan Haggerty in the title role and was directed by Richard Friedenberg.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 18, 1972

Feature film debut for Principal.

Released in United States Winter December 18, 1972