Cannonball Run II


1h 48m 1984

Brief Synopsis

Washed up race car driver J.J. McClure and his mechanic Victor Prinzim enter the cross-country Cannonball Run in a ambulance. In order to look more legitimate, they take along a doctor, Nikolas Van Helsing, and abduct a pretty photographer to pass as their patient.

Film Details

Also Known As
locos de Cannonball 2, Los
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Action
Comedy
Sequel
Sports
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

Washed up race car driver J.J. McClure and his mechanic Victor Prinzim enter the cross-country Cannonball Run in a ambulance. In order to look more legitimate, they take along a doctor, Nikolas Van Helsing, and abduct a pretty photographer to pass as their patient.

Crew

Thomas E Azzari

Art Director

Ralph Bakshi

Animator

Milton L Brown

Song

Al Capps

Music

Raymond Chow

Executive Producer

Bill Coker

Unit Production Manager

Tom Connors

Assistant Director

Virginia A Cook

Sound Editor

Judith A. Cory

Hair

Phil Cory

Special Effects

Ray De La Motte

Camera Operator

Jan Dewitt

Assistant Director

Carol Ann Digiuseppe

Assistant Editor

Steve Dorff

Song

Teri E. Dorman

Sound Editor

Lamont Dozier

Song

Susan Ekins

Other

Tom Ellingwood

Makeup

Jay Engel

Adr Editor

Jane Feinberg

Casting

Mike Fenton

Casting

Nancy Fogarty

Music Editor

Snuff Garrett

Music Supervisor

Snuff Garrett

Song

Michael A. Genne

Camera Operator

Alan Gibbs

Stunt Coordinator

Judith Gill

Production Coordinator

Charlene Goldman

Casting

William Gordean

Editor

Charles Graffeo

Set Decorator

Don Hall Jr.

Supervising Sound Editor

Jim Henrikson

Music Editor

Ellen Heuer

Foley Artist

Brian Holland

Song

Eddie Holland

Song

Joey Ippolito

Sound Editor

Donna Keegan

Stunt Man

Jerry Ketcham

Assistant Director

Charles Darin Knight

Sound

John Peter Kousakis

Assistant Director

Carl Kress

Editor

Gregg Landaker

Sound

Don Lykins

Other

Nick Mclean

Director Of Photography

Harvey Miller

Screenplay

Andre Morgan

Executive Producer

Hal Needham

Screenplay

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Kathy O'rear

Costumes

Michael O'shea

Camera Operator

Janice Parker

Assistant Editor

Dave Pell

Music Coordinator

Bill Petrotta

Props

Kathleen Rose

Sound Editor

Marlene Rubenstein

Post-Production Supervisor

Albert S. Ruddy

Screenplay

Albert S. Ruddy

Producer

Tim Ryan

Key Grip

Norman Saling

Costume Supervisor

Jack Schrader

Sound Editor

Peter Sorel

Photography

Ray Stevens

Song

Ray Stevens

Song Performer

Allen L Stone

Sound

The Supremes

Song Performer

Don Vargas

Costumes

Bill Varney

Sound

Frank Welker

Sound Effects

Hope Williams

Script Supervisor

Brock Yates

Characters As Source Material

Jack Young

Location Manager

Film Details

Also Known As
locos de Cannonball 2, Los
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Action
Comedy
Sequel
Sports
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Articles

Louis Nye (1913-2005)


"Hi-Ho, Steverino," was the catchphrase uttered by Gordon Hathaway, the fey, rich snob who greeted Steve Allen during the golden age of television. The man behind it all was Louis Nye, a fine character comedian who for the past 50 years had been a unique, lively presence in film and television. Sadly, Nye passed away on October 9 after a long battle with lung cancer at his Los Angeles home. He was 92.

Nye was born on May 1, 1913, in Hartford, Connecticut to Russian immigrants. He began his career in theater in his native Hartford before moving to New York City to break into radio. After a stint in the Army during World War II, Nye returned to find a new medium dawning, television. His start was inauspicious, just a few appearances on the Cavalcade of Stars, but little did he realize that when he was picked up for The Steve Allen Show in 1956 that he, along with other talented comedians like Don Knotts, Tom Poston and Bill Dana, were courting stardom. The program was one of the first sketch series to take off on television. It was justly celebrated for the wacky characterizations that the cast invented, and Nye's Gordon Hathaway was no exception. Sure, his take on the country club elite was a touch prissy and effete, but Nye injected Gordon with a raffish charm and child-like sensibilty that never made the character offensive. If anything, Gordon Hathaway was endearing.

His stint on Steve Allen opened up the movie offers, the first of which, the garish Mamie Van Doren vehicle Sex Kittens Go to College (1960), was not exactly a highpoint in cinema comedy, but he soon settled into some good supporting parts in a slew of films: The Facts of Life (1960), The Last Time I Saw Archie (his best film role, a terrrific comic foil for Robert Mitchum, 1961), The Wheeler Dealers, Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed? (both 1963), Good Neighbor Sam (another great part as an inept detective, 1964), and A Guide for the Married Man (1967).

Nye's career cooled in the '70s, with an occasional television appearance (Laverne & Shirley, Fantasy Island) and mediocre flicks (Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978). Eventually, he found solace in voice work for many animated shows, the most popular of them being his long run on Inspector Gadget (1985-99). Still, just when you thought he was out of the limelight, he returned as a semi-regular in the critically acclaimed HBO comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm where for two seasons (2000-2002), he was hilarious as comic Jeff Garlin's sardonic father. Give Mr. Nye his due, he left the stage near the top of his game. He is survived by his wife, Anita; and a son, Peter.

by Michael T. Toole
Louis Nye (1913-2005)

Louis Nye (1913-2005)

"Hi-Ho, Steverino," was the catchphrase uttered by Gordon Hathaway, the fey, rich snob who greeted Steve Allen during the golden age of television. The man behind it all was Louis Nye, a fine character comedian who for the past 50 years had been a unique, lively presence in film and television. Sadly, Nye passed away on October 9 after a long battle with lung cancer at his Los Angeles home. He was 92. Nye was born on May 1, 1913, in Hartford, Connecticut to Russian immigrants. He began his career in theater in his native Hartford before moving to New York City to break into radio. After a stint in the Army during World War II, Nye returned to find a new medium dawning, television. His start was inauspicious, just a few appearances on the Cavalcade of Stars, but little did he realize that when he was picked up for The Steve Allen Show in 1956 that he, along with other talented comedians like Don Knotts, Tom Poston and Bill Dana, were courting stardom. The program was one of the first sketch series to take off on television. It was justly celebrated for the wacky characterizations that the cast invented, and Nye's Gordon Hathaway was no exception. Sure, his take on the country club elite was a touch prissy and effete, but Nye injected Gordon with a raffish charm and child-like sensibilty that never made the character offensive. If anything, Gordon Hathaway was endearing. His stint on Steve Allen opened up the movie offers, the first of which, the garish Mamie Van Doren vehicle Sex Kittens Go to College (1960), was not exactly a highpoint in cinema comedy, but he soon settled into some good supporting parts in a slew of films: The Facts of Life (1960), The Last Time I Saw Archie (his best film role, a terrrific comic foil for Robert Mitchum, 1961), The Wheeler Dealers, Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed? (both 1963), Good Neighbor Sam (another great part as an inept detective, 1964), and A Guide for the Married Man (1967). Nye's career cooled in the '70s, with an occasional television appearance (Laverne & Shirley, Fantasy Island) and mediocre flicks (Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978). Eventually, he found solace in voice work for many animated shows, the most popular of them being his long run on Inspector Gadget (1985-99). Still, just when you thought he was out of the limelight, he returned as a semi-regular in the critically acclaimed HBO comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm where for two seasons (2000-2002), he was hilarious as comic Jeff Garlin's sardonic father. Give Mr. Nye his due, he left the stage near the top of his game. He is survived by his wife, Anita; and a son, Peter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States June 1984

Released in United States Summer July 13, 1984

Completed shooting December 1983.

Released in United States June 1984

Released in United States Summer July 13, 1984