King Kong


2h 15m 1976

Brief Synopsis

An oil company expedition disturbs the peace of Kong and brings him back to New York to exploit him. Although a woman in the group tames Kong somewhat, he finally breaks loose and terrorizes the city.

Film Details

Also Known As
King Kong: The Legend Reborn
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Fantasy
Horror
Release Date
1976
Location
Kauai, Hawaii, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

In this remake of the 1933 classic about the giant ape, this time an oil company expedition disturbs the peace of Kong and brings him back to New York to exploit him. Although a woman in the group tames Kong somewhat, he finally breaks loose and terrorizes the city, and as the military attempt to stop him, he falls to his death from the top of the World Trade Center.

Crew

Del Acevedo

Makeup

Arch Bacon

Art Director

Rick Baker

Technical Advisor

John Barry

Music

Peter Burrell

Assistant Director

Terry Carr

Production Manager

Don Chandler

Art Department

Mario Chiari

Production Designer

David Constable

Art Director

Merian C. Cooper

Other

Bill Couch

Stunt Coordinator

James Creelman

From Story

William M Cruse

Set Designer

Joe Day

Special Effects

Dino De Laurentiis

Producer

Federico De Laurentiis

Executive Producer

Christian Ferry

Executive Producer

John Franco

Set Decorator

Brian E Frankish

Production Manager

George Goodman

Production Manager

Robert Gundlach

Art Director

Nate Haggard

Assistant Director

Dale Hennesy

Production Designer

Dale Hennesy

Consultant

Mentor Huebner

Visual Effects

Lori Imbler

Production Coordinator

Pat Kehoe

Assistant Director

Richard Kline

Director Of Photography

James J Klinger

Sound Effects

Lou Lichtenfield

Matte Painter

Arny Lipin

Wardrobe

Arny Lipin

Costumes

Moss Mabry

Costume Designer

Moss Mabry

Wardrobe

William Mccaughey

Sound

David Mcgiffert

Assistant Director

David J Negron

Visual Effects

Kurt Neuman

Assistant Director

Barry A Nolan

Photography

Robert Pergament

Assistant Editor

Aldo Puccini

Miniatures

Carleton Reynolds

Set Designer

Carlo Rimbaldi

Other

Glen Robinson

Special Effects

Aaron Rochin

Sound

Ruth Rose

From Story

Lorenzo Semple Jr.

Screenplay

William Shephard

Technical Advisor

Jack Solomon

Sound

Eddie Surkin

Other

Anthea Sylbert

Wardrobe

Anthea Sylbert

Costume Designer

Harry W. Tetrick

Sound

Claude Thompson

Choreographer

Phil Tucker

Post-Production Supervisor

Frank Van Der Veer

Photography

Dianne Wager

Set Designer

Edgar Wallace

Other

Dan Wallin

Sound

Fern Weber

Wardrobe

Fern Weber

Costumes

Harold Wellman

Photography

Ralph E. Winters

Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
King Kong: The Legend Reborn
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Fantasy
Horror
Release Date
1976
Location
Kauai, Hawaii, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Cinematography

1976

Best Sound

1976

Articles

King Kong: The History of a Movie Icon From Fay Wray to Peter Jackson


He is one of the most amazing, popular, and iconic characters in the history of motion pictures. His 1933 debut was a legendary piece of pure cinema - simultaneously a terrifying monster movie, epic fairy tale, tragic love story, and deeply resonant cultural myth. His name is King Kong. Ray Morton's King Kong - The Making of a Movie Icon (Applause Books) is the first book to chronicle the making of all seven feature films in which the character of Kong has appeared, including the hotly anticipated Peter Jackson film opening in December 2005. It is generously illustrated with photographs, production art, and promotional materials from the author's extensive private collection.

Morton has interviewed the surviving members of each major film. A colorful overview of the tremendous amount of collectible Kong merchandise is also on view for all the fans of Kongdom to devour.

Morton, who has worked in Hollywood for the past 15 years as a writer, story consultant and script analyst and is currently a senior writer and columnist for Sc(i)pt magazine, first saw the original King Kong on TV when he was 8 years old. Fascinated by the character and thrilled with the cinematic magic that brought him to life, Morton has spent years researching the various films and, in the process, accumulating the wealth of in-depth information and detail that forms the basis of this book.

To order The Direct Cinema of David and Albert Maysles, use this link to Barnes and Noble.
King Kong: The History Of A Movie Icon From Fay Wray To Peter Jackson

King Kong: The History of a Movie Icon From Fay Wray to Peter Jackson

He is one of the most amazing, popular, and iconic characters in the history of motion pictures. His 1933 debut was a legendary piece of pure cinema - simultaneously a terrifying monster movie, epic fairy tale, tragic love story, and deeply resonant cultural myth. His name is King Kong. Ray Morton's King Kong - The Making of a Movie Icon (Applause Books) is the first book to chronicle the making of all seven feature films in which the character of Kong has appeared, including the hotly anticipated Peter Jackson film opening in December 2005. It is generously illustrated with photographs, production art, and promotional materials from the author's extensive private collection. Morton has interviewed the surviving members of each major film. A colorful overview of the tremendous amount of collectible Kong merchandise is also on view for all the fans of Kongdom to devour. Morton, who has worked in Hollywood for the past 15 years as a writer, story consultant and script analyst and is currently a senior writer and columnist for Sc(i)pt magazine, first saw the original King Kong on TV when he was 8 years old. Fascinated by the character and thrilled with the cinematic magic that brought him to life, Morton has spent years researching the various films and, in the process, accumulating the wealth of in-depth information and detail that forms the basis of this book. To order The Direct Cinema of David and Albert Maysles, use this link to Barnes and Noble.

TCM Remembers - John Agar


TCM REMEMBERS JOHN AGAR, 1921-2002

Popular b-movie actor John Agar died April 7th at the age of 81. Agar is probably best known as the actor that married Shirley Temple in 1945 but he also appeared alongside John Wayne in several films. Agar soon became a fixture in such films as Tarantula (1955) and The Mole People (1956) and was a cult favorite ever since, something he took in good spirits and seemed to enjoy. In 1972, for instance, the fan magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland mistakenly ran his obituary, a piece that Agar would later happily autograph.

Agar was born January 31, 1921 in Chicago. He had been a sergeant in the Army Air Corps working as a physical trainer when he was hired in 1945 to escort 16-year-old Shirley Temple to a Hollywood party. Agar apparently knew Temple earlier since his sister was a classmate of Temple's. Despite the objections of Temple's mother the two became a couple and were married shortly after. Temple's producer David Selznick asked Agar if he wanted to act but he reportedly replied that one actor in the family was enough. Nevertheless, Selznick paid for acting lessons and signed Agar to a contract.

Agar's first film was the John Ford-directed Fort Apache (1948) also starring Temple. Agar and Temple also both appeared in Adventure in Baltimore (1949) and had a daughter in 1948 but were divorced the following year. Agar married again in 1951 which lasted until his wife's death in 2000. Agar worked in a string of Westerns and war films such as Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), Breakthrough (1950) and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). Later when pressed for money he began making the films that would establish his reputation beyond the gossip columns: Revenge of the Creature (1955), The Brain from Planet Arous (1957), Invisible Invaders (1959) and the mind-boggling Zontar, the Thing from Venus (1966). The roles became progressively smaller so Agar sold insurance and real estate on the side. When he appeared in the 1988 film Miracle Mile his dialogue supposedly included obscenities which Agar had always refused to use. He showed the director a way to do the scene without that language and that's how it was filmed.

By Lang Thompson

DUDLEY MOORE, 1935-2002

Award-winning actor, comedian and musician Dudley Moore died on March 27th at the age of 66. Moore first gained notice in his native England for ground-breaking stage and TV comedy before later building a Hollywood career. Like many of his peers, he had an amiable, open appeal that was balanced against a sharply satiric edge. Moore could play the confused innocent as well as the crafty schemer and tended to command attention wherever he appeared. Among his four marriages were two actresses: Tuesday Weld and Suzy Kendall.

Moore was born April 19, 1935 in London. As a child, he had a club foot later corrected by years of surgery that often left him recuperating in the hospital alongside critically wounded soldiers. Moore attended Oxford where he earned a degree in musical composition and met future collaborators Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Alan Bennett. The four formed the landmark comedy ensemble Beyond the Fringe. Though often merely labelled as a precursor to Monty Python's Flying Circus, Beyond the Fringe was instrumental in the marriage of the piercing, highly educated sense of humor cultivated by Oxbridge graduates to the modern mass media. In this case it was the revue stage and television where Beyond the Fringe first assaulted the astonished minds of Britons. Moore supplied the music and such songs as "The Sadder and Wiser Beaver," "Man Bites God" and "One Leg Too Few." (You can pick up a CD set with much of the stage show. Unfortunately for future historians the BBC commonly erased tapes at this period - why? - so many of the TV episodes are apparently gone forever.)

Moore's first feature film was the 1966 farce The Wrong Box (a Robert Louis Stevenson adaptation) but it was his collaboration with Peter Cook on Bedazzled (1967) that's endured. Unlike its tepid 2000 remake, the original Bedazzled is a wolverine-tough satire of mid-60s culture that hasn't aged a bit: viewers are still as likely to be appalled and entertained at the same time. Moore not only co-wrote the story with Cook but composed the score. Moore appeared in a few more films until starring in 10 (1979). Written and directed by Blake Edwards, this amiable comedy featured Moore (a last-minute replacement for George Segal) caught in a middle-aged crisis and proved popular with both audiences and critics. Moore's career took another turn when his role as a wealthy alcoholic who falls for the proverbial shop girl in Arthur (1981) snagged him an Oscar nomination as Best Actor and a Golden Globe win.

However Moore was never able to build on these successes. He starred in a passable remake of Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours (1984), did another Blake Edwards romantic comedy of moderate interest called Micki + Maude (1984, also a Golden Globe winner for Moore), a misfired sequel to Arthur in 1988 and a few other little-seen films. The highlight of this period must certainly be the 1991 series Orchestra where Moore spars with the wonderfully crusty conductor Georg Solti and leads an orchestra of students in what's certainly some of the most delightful television ever made.

By Lang Thompson

TCM Remembers - John Agar

TCM REMEMBERS JOHN AGAR, 1921-2002 Popular b-movie actor John Agar died April 7th at the age of 81. Agar is probably best known as the actor that married Shirley Temple in 1945 but he also appeared alongside John Wayne in several films. Agar soon became a fixture in such films as Tarantula (1955) and The Mole People (1956) and was a cult favorite ever since, something he took in good spirits and seemed to enjoy. In 1972, for instance, the fan magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland mistakenly ran his obituary, a piece that Agar would later happily autograph. Agar was born January 31, 1921 in Chicago. He had been a sergeant in the Army Air Corps working as a physical trainer when he was hired in 1945 to escort 16-year-old Shirley Temple to a Hollywood party. Agar apparently knew Temple earlier since his sister was a classmate of Temple's. Despite the objections of Temple's mother the two became a couple and were married shortly after. Temple's producer David Selznick asked Agar if he wanted to act but he reportedly replied that one actor in the family was enough. Nevertheless, Selznick paid for acting lessons and signed Agar to a contract. Agar's first film was the John Ford-directed Fort Apache (1948) also starring Temple. Agar and Temple also both appeared in Adventure in Baltimore (1949) and had a daughter in 1948 but were divorced the following year. Agar married again in 1951 which lasted until his wife's death in 2000. Agar worked in a string of Westerns and war films such as Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), Breakthrough (1950) and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). Later when pressed for money he began making the films that would establish his reputation beyond the gossip columns: Revenge of the Creature (1955), The Brain from Planet Arous (1957), Invisible Invaders (1959) and the mind-boggling Zontar, the Thing from Venus (1966). The roles became progressively smaller so Agar sold insurance and real estate on the side. When he appeared in the 1988 film Miracle Mile his dialogue supposedly included obscenities which Agar had always refused to use. He showed the director a way to do the scene without that language and that's how it was filmed. By Lang Thompson DUDLEY MOORE, 1935-2002 Award-winning actor, comedian and musician Dudley Moore died on March 27th at the age of 66. Moore first gained notice in his native England for ground-breaking stage and TV comedy before later building a Hollywood career. Like many of his peers, he had an amiable, open appeal that was balanced against a sharply satiric edge. Moore could play the confused innocent as well as the crafty schemer and tended to command attention wherever he appeared. Among his four marriages were two actresses: Tuesday Weld and Suzy Kendall. Moore was born April 19, 1935 in London. As a child, he had a club foot later corrected by years of surgery that often left him recuperating in the hospital alongside critically wounded soldiers. Moore attended Oxford where he earned a degree in musical composition and met future collaborators Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Alan Bennett. The four formed the landmark comedy ensemble Beyond the Fringe. Though often merely labelled as a precursor to Monty Python's Flying Circus, Beyond the Fringe was instrumental in the marriage of the piercing, highly educated sense of humor cultivated by Oxbridge graduates to the modern mass media. In this case it was the revue stage and television where Beyond the Fringe first assaulted the astonished minds of Britons. Moore supplied the music and such songs as "The Sadder and Wiser Beaver," "Man Bites God" and "One Leg Too Few." (You can pick up a CD set with much of the stage show. Unfortunately for future historians the BBC commonly erased tapes at this period - why? - so many of the TV episodes are apparently gone forever.) Moore's first feature film was the 1966 farce The Wrong Box (a Robert Louis Stevenson adaptation) but it was his collaboration with Peter Cook on Bedazzled (1967) that's endured. Unlike its tepid 2000 remake, the original Bedazzled is a wolverine-tough satire of mid-60s culture that hasn't aged a bit: viewers are still as likely to be appalled and entertained at the same time. Moore not only co-wrote the story with Cook but composed the score. Moore appeared in a few more films until starring in 10 (1979). Written and directed by Blake Edwards, this amiable comedy featured Moore (a last-minute replacement for George Segal) caught in a middle-aged crisis and proved popular with both audiences and critics. Moore's career took another turn when his role as a wealthy alcoholic who falls for the proverbial shop girl in Arthur (1981) snagged him an Oscar nomination as Best Actor and a Golden Globe win. However Moore was never able to build on these successes. He starred in a passable remake of Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours (1984), did another Blake Edwards romantic comedy of moderate interest called Micki + Maude (1984, also a Golden Globe winner for Moore), a misfired sequel to Arthur in 1988 and a few other little-seen films. The highlight of this period must certainly be the 1991 series Orchestra where Moore spars with the wonderfully crusty conductor Georg Solti and leads an orchestra of students in what's certainly some of the most delightful television ever made. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

There is a girl out there who might be running for her life from some gigantic turned-on ape.
- Jack Prescott
Lights! Camera! Kong!
- Fred
Even an environmental rapist like you wouldn't destroy a new and unique species.
- Jack Prescott
Bet me.
- Fred Wilson

Trivia

Carlo Rambaldi was to design a life-sized mechanical gorilla for filming. While the massive and expensive model was being constructed, makeup artist 'Baker, Rick' built a much cheaper gorilla costume to wear in some scenes. Sources vary as to what happened to Rambaldi's model.

Barbra Streisand was considered for the part of Dwan.

When Jessica Lange's character Dwan first appears in the film she is in a rubber dingy floating towards the Petrox explorer. She was later told by her make-up assistant that a shark had been seen near her dingy when she was in it.

Universal had originally planned to make a more faithful remake of the original film to be entitled "The Legend of King Kong", which was going to be a period piece set in the 1930s. However, they backed out when this modern remake was announced.

Hammer had also intended to remake the movie a few years earlier, but it was scrapped after a few test reels were shot. However, some of the Hammer footage was used in a Volkswagen commercial.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 1976

Released in United States Winter December 17, 1976

Released in United States December 1976

Released in United States Winter December 17, 1976