Fred M. Wilcox


Director
Fred M. Wilcox

About

Also Known As
Fred Wilcox
Birth Place
Tazewell, Virginia, USA
Died
September 24, 1964

Biography

Fred M Wilcox enjoyed success as a director over the course of his Hollywood career, owed mainly to a vast supply of imagination and a fierce attention to detail. In 1926, he was hired by MGM as a publicist. M Wilcox received his start directing films, including work on the drama "Lassie Come Home" (1943) with Roddy McDowall, the adventure "Courage of Lassie" (1946) with Elizabeth T...

Biography

Fred M Wilcox enjoyed success as a director over the course of his Hollywood career, owed mainly to a vast supply of imagination and a fierce attention to detail. In 1926, he was hired by MGM as a publicist. M Wilcox received his start directing films, including work on the drama "Lassie Come Home" (1943) with Roddy McDowall, the adventure "Courage of Lassie" (1946) with Elizabeth Taylor and the Edmund Gwenn drama "Hills of Home" (1948). Shortly thereafter, he received directorial credit for the Jeanette MacDonald musical comedy "Three Daring Daughters" (1948), the fantastical drama "The Secret Garden" (1949) with Margaret O'Brien and the drama "Shadow in the Sky" (1952) with Ralph Meeker. He also appeared in the drama "Tennessee Champ" (1954) with Shelley Winters. in the forties and the sixtiesLater in his career, M Wilcox directed "I Passed For White" (1960). M Wilcox passed away in September 1964 at the age of 57.

Life Events

1926

Was hired by MGM as a publicist

1943

Film directing debut with "Lassie Come Home"

1960

First film as producer with "I Passed for White" (also screenwriter)

Photo Collections

Lassie Come Home - Behind-the-Scenes Stills
Here are several photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of MGM's Lassie Come Home (1943), starring Lassie and Roddy McDowall.
Hills of Home - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Hills of Home (1948), featuring Lassie. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Videos

Movie Clip

Forbidden Planet -- (Movie Clip) Face Of The Gorgon Stupendous sets by Arthur Lonergan as Morbius (Walter Pidgeon) gives Adams (Leslie Nielsen) and "Doc" (Warren Stevens) a tour of the "Krell" machinery, ending with a Greek myth reference, in Forbidden Planet, 1956.
Forbidden Planet -- (Movie Clip) Blood And Fire And Thunder Disney animators loaned to MGM for this display of the "planetary force" facing Commander Adams (Leslie Nielsen) and crew, and awakening Dr. Morbius (Walter Pidgeon) and daughter Altaira (Anne Francis) in Forbidden Planet, 1956.
Three Daring Daughters (1948) -- (Movie Clip) The Dickey Bird Tess, Alix and Ilka (Jane Powell, Mary Eleanor Donahue, Ann E. Todd) have just been told their fashion-editor single mom (Jeanette MacDonald) needs to take a cruise, and it's settled with a song by Howard Dietz and Sammy Fein, in Three Daring Daughters, 1948, from MGM producer Joe Pasternak.
Three Daring Daughters (1948) -- (Movie Clip) Never A Serious Divorce Sisters Jane Powell, Mary Eleanor Donahue, and Ann E. Todd visit publisher Nelson (Edward Arnold), guarded by his secretary (Dick Simmons), in the mistaken belief that he employs their father, Jane's song "Passepied," attributed to French composer Leo Delibes, in Three Daring Daughters, 1948.
Three Daring Daughters (1948) -- (Movie Clip) Where There's Love Divorced fashion editor and single mom Louise (Jeanette MacDonald), resting on doctor's orders on a cruise to Cuba, joins pianist Jose Iturbi (playing himself) for a song by Richard Strauss, with lyrics by Earl Brent, in MGM's Three Daring Daughters, 1948, co-starring Jane Powell.
Secret Garden, The (1949) -- (Movie Clip) Who's Going To Take Care Of Me? Mopping up after a cholera epidemic in India, a British officer (Lowell Gilmore) finds himself informing young Mary (Margaret O'Brien) that she's an orphan, early in The Secret Garden, 1949.
Secret Garden, The (1949) -- (Movie Clip) I'd Hoped You Might Be Beautiful Orphan Mary (Margaret O'Brien), caught while seeking the source of the night time screaming, is summoned to see her mysterious uncle (Herbert Marshall) who's adopted her, in The Secret Garden, 1949, directed by Fred M. Wilcox.
Secret Garden, The (1949) -- (Movie Clip) I'm Not At All A Ghost Trying again to find out who’s been screaming in the dark English manor of the uncle who’s adopted her, orphan Mary discovers Colin (Dean Stockwell), her heretofore unknown cousin, who has strange attitudes, in The Secret Garden, 1949, from the Frances Hodgson Burnett novel.
Secret Garden, The (1949) -- (Movie Clip) I Want Another Servant! Orphaned Mary (Margaret O'Brien), just arrived from India, meets her none-too-helpful new servant Martha (Elsa Lanchester) on her first morning in her uncle's home, in The Secret Garden, 1949.
Lassie Come Home (1943) -- (Movie Clip) Apply Yourself Prologue about the author, introduction of the famous collie and his young master Joe (Roddy McDowall), distracted in school, from MGM's hit Lassie Come Home, 1943, featuring Elizabeth Taylor.
Lassie Come Home (1943) -- (Movie Clip) I Only Want Lassie Young Yorkshireman Joe (Roddy McDowall) had no warning whatever that his cash-strapped parents (Donald Crisp, Elsa Lanchester) had plans to sell the collie, rushing home after school for a difficult explanation, early in the MGM hit that launched the popular series, Lassie Come Home, 1943.
Lassie Come Home (1943) -- (Movie Clip) Bid Her Stay Father and Joe (Donald Crisp, Roddy McDowall) return the star to the duke (Nigel Bruce) after a second escape, the trainer (J. Patrick O’Malley) scolded before Priscilla (Elizabeth Taylor) offers reassurance, in her first on-screen meeting with her lifelong friend (McDowall), in Lassie Come Home, 1943.

Promo

Bibliography