Alfonso Bedoya


Actor
Alfonso Bedoya

About

Birth Place
Vicam, Sonora, MX
Born
April 16, 1904
Died
December 15, 1957

Biography

Alfonso Bedoya was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. In 1948, he made his Hollywood film acting debut. Bedoya started his acting career landing roles in such films as "Angel in Exile" (1948), "Angel on the Amazon" (1948) and the Humphrey Bogart dramatic adventure "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre" (1948). He also appeared in "Border Incident" (1949) with Ricardo Montalb...

Biography

Alfonso Bedoya was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. In 1948, he made his Hollywood film acting debut. Bedoya started his acting career landing roles in such films as "Angel in Exile" (1948), "Angel on the Amazon" (1948) and the Humphrey Bogart dramatic adventure "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre" (1948). He also appeared in "Border Incident" (1949) with Ricardo Montalban. He continued to act in productions like "Streets of Laredo" (1949) with Macdonald Carey, the Louis Hayward action film "Fortunes of Captain Blood" (1950) and the adventure "The Black Rose" (1950) with Tyrone Power. In the latter half of his career, he tackled roles in the Randolph Scott romance "Man in the Saddle" (1951), "Sombrero" (1953) with Ricardo Montalban and "The Stranger Wore a Gun" (1953). Bedoya was most recently credited in the adaptation "The Big Country" (1958) with Gregory Peck. Bedoya passed away in December 1957 at the age of 53.

Life Events

1948

Made his Hollywood film acting debut

Photo Collections

Border Incident - Publicity Still
Here is a publicity still from MGM's Border Incident (1949), directed by Anthony Mann and Starring Ricardo Montalban and George Murphy. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Border Incident - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from MGM's Border Incident (1949), starring Ricardo Montalban and directed by Anthony Mann. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Bibliography